Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

September 2011 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: October 03, 2011.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for September 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

High Risk of Salvage Transplant Failure Post Liver Resection

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Initial liver resection (LR) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within Milan criteria (MC) is a valid treatment for patients with good liver function who develop recurrence within MC, but salvage transplantation (ST) has a high rate of failure for those with recurrence beyond MC, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Doctors, Patients Identify Tacit Clues in Their Interactions

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Both doctors and patients identify tacit clues as well as judgments based on these clues during video elicitation interviews of health maintenance examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Advanced Adenomas, CRCs More Prevalent in Men

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals older than 50 years, men have a significantly increased prevalence of adenomas, advanced adenomas (AAs), and carcinomas compared to women, according to a study published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lower Cancer Fatalism Tied to Increased Cancer Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Better self-rated health and lower cancer fatalism are associated with greater participation in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in England, and mediate the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on fecal occult blood test (FOBt) uptake, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Docs Feel They Give More Patient Care Than Required

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many primary care physicians in the United States believe that their patients are receiving too much medical care, and that the pressure to do more than is necessary could be reduced by malpractice reform, adjusting financial incentives, and spending more time with patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Colorectal Cancer Subsite Risk Tied to Fruit/Vegetable Intake

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) associated with different fruit and vegetable (F/V) consumption varies depending on the tumor location within the large bowel, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Full Text

Reasons for Referral to Specific Docs Differ Among Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) and medical and surgical specialists differ in their reasons for selecting specific colleagues for referrals, with PCPs more concerned about physician communication and medical record sharing than specialists, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Remicade Approved for Ulcerative Colitis in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Remicade (infliximab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat moderate-to-severe active episodes of ulcerative colitis in children aged six and older who haven't responded to other therapies.

Medline Plus

Updated Guides Compare Treatments for GERD

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Updated, evidence-based, reader-friendly reports comparing treatments for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have been released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to help guide patient and physician decision-making in treating this condition that affects up to 4 percent of Americans.

More Information

Generic Tacrolimus Safe for Liver, Kidney Recipients

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have undergone liver or kidney transplants may safely switch from brand-name to generic tacrolimus with no change in the indices of liver or kidney function or rejection, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Evidence for Nondrug Childhood Constipation Therapies Limited

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Although there is a lack of high-quality evidence for nonpharmacologic treatments for childhood constipation, there is some evidence of effectiveness of fiber supplements, but not for effectiveness of fluid supplements, prebiotics, probiotics, or behavioral interventions, according to a review published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Therapy Ups Pancreatitis Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The use of exenatide and sitagliptin for type 2 diabetes is associated with a higher odds ratio of pancreatitis and increased reports of pancreatic cancer, according to a study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction Cut Health Care Use, Costs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccine (RV5) in 2006, diarrhea-related health care utilization and medical expenditures for U.S. children younger than 5 years old decreased considerably in the rotavirus seasons, according to a study published in the Sept. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mortality Up in Hospitals With More Minority Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of in-hospital mortality for trauma patients are associated with the proportion of minority patients in the hospital, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Work Intensity Similar Across Physician Specialties

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The level of physician work intensity appears to be similar among specialties, with variations in the specific dimensions of stress, physical demands, performance, and temporal demand, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Medical Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Optimal CRC Screening Varies With Age, Family History

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The optimal colonoscopy screening strategy for individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) varies considerably with the number of affected first-degree relatives and their age at diagnosis, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pre-Liver Transplant Serum Ferritin Level Predicts Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated serum ferritin (SF) concentration in combination with low transferrin saturation (TFS) prior to liver transplantation (LT) is an independent predictor of mortality following transplantation, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Anti-Nausea Drug May Lead to Dangerous Heart Rhythms

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Zofran (ondansetron), used to prevent nausea in patients receiving cancer treatment, is undergoing an ongoing safety review and labeling change by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration because it may cause potentially fatal changes in heart rhythm, according to a Sept. 15 FDA safety alert.

More Information

CDC: Risk Factors ID'd in Most C. difficile Diarrhea Cases

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients with diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) have recognized risk factors or a co-infection with another pathogen, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Full Text

New Tiered Sharing Policy Suggested for Liver Transplants

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An algorithm incorporating a national sharing policy with a tiered policy, such as the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), may reduce the number of wait-list deaths and organ travel distances, according to a study published in the September issue of Liver Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Reduced Treatment Time Noninferior for Some With Hep C

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Sustained virologic response for some patients who have chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) was found to be noninferior when treating for 24 weeks versus 48 weeks, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Malaria Vaccine Does Not Protect Against Clinical Malaria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The malaria vaccine, FMP 2.1/AS02A, based on apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum does not provide significant protection against clinical malaria, but may have strain-specific efficacy against parasites with AMA1 corresponding to that of the vaccine strain, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

IBS, Chronic Fatigue Risk Up Three Years Post Giardiasis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Three years after acute illness with Giardia lamblia, the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and chronic fatigue is significantly higher than in a control population, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Gut.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Mistakenly Believe FDA OKs Only Safe, Effective Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of the U.S. public mistakenly believes that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves only effective and safe drugs, but providing consumer explanations can lead to better drug choices, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Number of Lymph Nodes Tested for Colon CA Up 1988 to 2008

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For patients treated surgically for colon cancer, the number of lymph nodes evaluated increased from 1988 to 2008; however, there was no significant increase in lymph node positivity during the same period, according to a study published in the Sept. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Febrile Seizures Tied to Systemic Respiratory Alkalosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Febrile seizures (FS) in children are associated with systemic respiratory alkalosis, and the lack of FS in children with gastroenteritis (GE) may be attributable to the low pH in GE, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in Epilepsia.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospitalizations for Eating Disorders Up Over Last Decade

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Although hospitalizations with a principal or secondary eating-disorder diagnosis increased by 24 percent from 1999-2000 to 2008-2009, there has been a decrease in hospitalizations with a principal diagnosis of eating disorder from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009, according to a statistical brief based on data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) published online Sept. 8 by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Report

Long-Term Diet Tied to Gut Microbe Enterotype Clustering

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term diet is strongly associated with specific enterotypes of gut microbiome, in particular protein and animal fat with Bacteroids, and carbohydrates with Prevotella, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Science.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

HPPH-Photodynamic Therapy Safe in Precancerous Barrett's

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) is safe with promising efficacy in precancerous lesions associated with Barrett's esophagus, according to a study published in the September issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms Tied to 9/11 Exposure

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals who were exposed to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC), the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) is higher in those with asthma or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and highest in those in whom both comorbidities are present, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in The American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Announces Label Change to Warnings for TNFα Blockers

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Labels for all tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) blockers have been revised to include the risk of infection from Legionella and Listeria, according to a safety alert issued Sept. 7 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Comparative Efficacy Proposed for European Drug Approval

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- New drugs should be compared with existing treatments instead of placebo before their approval in Europe, according to a report published online Sept. 6 in the BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Hospital Staff Uniforms Contaminated With Bacteria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- More than 60 percent of hospital staff uniforms are contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria, including drug-resistant species, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Odds of Board Certification Vary in New Doctors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Certification of recent U.S. medical school graduates by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) varies across specialties by educational and demographic factors, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Students Show Racial, Cultural Patient Preference

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students may have a preferential bias toward whites and wealthier patients, but this does not appear to influence their clinical decision making or physician-patient interactions, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

More Weight Loss for Duodenal Switch Than Gastric Bypass

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Duodenal switch results in greater reduction in body mass index (BMI) and total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol than gastric bypass, but has a higher rate of adverse events than gastric bypass, according to a study published in the Sept. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Researchers Ponder 9/11 Health Impact a Decade Later

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- It may be too early to tell how much of an impact the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster and its immediate aftermath had on those exposed, but cancer, death, mental and physical disorders, and spirometric abnormalities appear higher in people who received greater levels of exposure, according to three studies published in the 9/11-themed Sept. 3 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract - Zeig-Owens
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Jordan
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Wisnivesky
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: September 2011 Briefing - Family Practice Next: September 2011 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.