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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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September 2011 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: October 03, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for September 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Position in Social Networks May Predict Adolescent Alcohol Use

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who begin drinking alcohol have more friends and friends of friends who drink, are closer in their social network to more popular people, and interact with more friends and friends of friends compared to adolescents who don't drink, according to a study published in the September issue of Academic Pediatrics.

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Surfactants Feasible for Self-Breathing Preterm Infants

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Application of surfactant to spontaneously breathing preterm infants stabilized with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is feasible, and reduces the need for mechanical ventilation, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in The Lancet.

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Doctors, Patients Identify Tacit Clues in Their Interactions

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Both doctors and patients identify tacit clues as well as judgments based on these clues during video elicitation interviews of health maintenance examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Parents of Children With Down Syndrome Happy and Proud

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of parents and siblings of individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are happy and proud of their child/sibling; and those with DS are happy with their lives and love their families, according to three studies published in the October issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics.

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Three New Gene Loci ID'd for Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Three new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified, which are significantly associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) susceptibility, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in PLoS Genetics.

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Illness Associated With HEV68 Seen in Clusters Globally

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Human enterovirus 68 (HEV68), rarely reported since it was first identified in the early 1960s, has recently been seen in disease clusters around the world, according to research published in the Sept. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Surveillance Info Sheds Light on Utah's Influenza Patterns

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The United States was hard hit by the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus, and Utah experienced a particularly high proportion of severe illness compared with previous influenza seasons, particularly among certain subsets of the population, according to research published in the Sept. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Maternal, Cord Blood Folate Not Tied to Childhood Eczema

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal and cord blood serum folate levels are not significantly different between infants with and without eczema, but infants exposed to high doses of supplemental folic acid per day in the third trimester have an increased risk of eczema, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Allergy.

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Slow, Steady Rise in Stimulant Use for ADHD Since 1996

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The use of stimulant medications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has increased consistently since 1996, with greater use in adolescents and decreasing use in preschoolers, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Child Face Mask Approved to Help Prevent Spread of Germs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A child-size, single-use face mask to help prevent the spread of germs in hospitals and other health care settings has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Immune Globulin Therapy Has No Benefit for Neonatal Sepsis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Infants with suspected or proven sepsis treated with intravenous immune globulin have no significant difference in outcomes compared to those receiving a placebo, according to a study published in the Sept. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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AHA: Tools, Challenges for Assessing Adiposity Identified

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) should be used as primary tools for assessing adiposity, according to an American Heart Association scientific statement published online Sept. 26 in Circulation.

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DMARDs Found to Be Effective Treatment for Juvenile Arthritis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) may be more effective than ibuprofen or steroids in controlling juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but there is little strong evidence to support their long-term use, according to a new report released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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U.S. Docs Feel They Give More Patient Care Than Required

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many primary care physicians in the United States believe that their patients are receiving too much medical care, and that the pressure to do more than is necessary could be reduced by malpractice reform, adjusting financial incentives, and spending more time with patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Reasons for Referral to Specific Docs Differ Among Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) and medical and surgical specialists differ in their reasons for selecting specific colleagues for referrals, with PCPs more concerned about physician communication and medical record sharing than specialists, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Asthma Prevalence Elevated in Youth With Diabetes

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma is more prevalent in youth with diabetes compared to the general U.S. population, and is associated with poor glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes, especially if untreated, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Remicade Approved for Ulcerative Colitis in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Remicade (infliximab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat moderate-to-severe active episodes of ulcerative colitis in children aged six and older who haven't responded to other therapies.

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Tdap Safe After Tetanus-, Diphtheria-Containing Products

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The use of tetanus toxoid, reduced-content diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) is safe, with no excess reactogenecity and no need for caution regarding Tdap use within any interval of a tetanus- or diphtheria-containing toxoid product, according to a policy statement published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Fewer U.S. Hospitals Provide Free Infant Formula

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of U.S. hospitals that distribute industry-sponsored formula sample packs decreased from 2007 to 2010, with the biggest drop in states with a higher proportion of sample-pack-free hospitals in 2007, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Evidence for Nondrug Childhood Constipation Therapies Limited

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Although there is a lack of high-quality evidence for nonpharmacologic treatments for childhood constipation, there is some evidence of effectiveness of fiber supplements, but not for effectiveness of fluid supplements, prebiotics, probiotics, or behavioral interventions, according to a review published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Diabetes-Free Life Expectancy at 18 Years Down Since 1980s

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The diabetes-free life expectancy at 18 years of age in the United States decreased in both men and women between the 1980s and 2000s, with obese individuals experiencing the greatest losses, according to a study published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.

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Soliris Approval Expanded to Include Rare Blood Disorder

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Soliris (eculizumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the first drug to treat atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a rare blood disease that may trigger kidney failure, stroke or death.

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Glycemic Control Risk Factors ID'd in Youth With Diabetes

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Duration of diabetes, socioeconomic status, extensive daily media viewing, but not physical activity are significant risk factors of poor glycemic control in children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in Diabetes Care.

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Total Sleep Time Tied to Obese Teen Glucose Homeostasis

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Inadequate or excessive sleep is associated with disruptions in insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis in obese adolescents, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Early Interventions Prevent Child-Development Inequality

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In low- and middle-income countries, exposure to psychological and biological risks compromise child development in children younger than 5 years, and parenting and center-based programs can improve children's cognitive and social-emotional development, according to two reviews published online Sept. 23 in The Lancet.

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Previous Infant Death Ups Subsequent Stillbirth Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women whose first pregnancy resulted in infant death are nearly three times more likely to have a stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy, with black women having a higher risk than white women, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Bed Bug Treatment Can Cause Illness

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Illnesses related to the pesticides used to treat bed bug infestations -- an increasingly prevalent problem in the United States and worldwide -- are few and far between; still, inappropriate use of the insecticides can and does cause harm, according to research published in the Sept. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Teen Exposure to Smoking in Films Ups Smoking Behaviors

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with higher exposure to smoking depictions in films are more likely to initiate smoking and be current smokers, even after adjusting for social, family, and behavioral confounders, according to a study and meta-analysis published online Sept. 19 in Thorax.

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Circulating Glucose Levels Impact Responses to Food Cues

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Mild hypoglycemia activates limbic-striatal brain regions in response to food cues resulting in a increased desire for high-calorie food, whereas higher circulating glucose levels predict increased medial prefrontal cortex activation, a response which is absent in obese individuals, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Nocturnal Hypertension Ups cIMT in Youth With Diabetes

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Nocturnal hypertension in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes is associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction Cut Health Care Use, Costs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccine (RV5) in 2006, diarrhea-related health care utilization and medical expenditures for U.S. children younger than 5 years old decreased considerably in the rotavirus seasons, according to a study published in the Sept. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Preterm Birth Ups Mortality Risk in Young Adulthood

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Low gestational age at birth is associated with increased mortality in young adulthood, according to a study published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Age, Treating Physician Tied to Pediatric Psoriasis Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment for pediatric psoriasis varies according to treating physician and children's age, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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ADHD Symptoms Increase Injury Risk in Fifth Graders

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms in fifth graders is associated with injury risk, although in multivariable analysis the association only remains significant for ADHD symptoms, according to a study published in the September issue of Academic Pediatrics.

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2006/2007 U.S. Flu Vaccination Policy Lowers Morbidity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The 2006/2007 influenza vaccination policy change in the United States to include healthy children aged 24 to 59 months has reduced influenza morbidity in the United States, as evident by reduction in the emergency department visits in the United States versus Canada, according to a study published in the Sept. 20 issue of the CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Methylphenidate Hydrochloride Delays Puberty in Monkeys

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Methylphenidate hydrochloride (MPH) delays pubertal progression with impaired testicular descent, reduced testicular volume, and decreased serum testosterone levels in juvenile male rhesus monkeys, according to an experimental study published online Sept. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Mortality Up in Hospitals With More Minority Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of in-hospital mortality for trauma patients are associated with the proportion of minority patients in the hospital, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Ongoing Disease Evident in Population-Based Study of JIA

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of children from defined Nordic geographic areas with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) experience ongoing disease, although disease activity is mostly mild, according to a study published in the September issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Cognitive Behavior Therapy, SRIs Improve OCD Treatment

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) together with serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) is a better treatment for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) than medication management alone, according to a study published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Young Cancer Patients Have Low Clinical Trial Participation

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in clinical trials is low among adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer, with uninsured, older patients, or those treated by nonpediatric oncologists less likely to participate, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Progressive Decline in Child, Maternal Mortality Since 1990

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although many countries are progressing in reducing maternal and child mortality, only a small number of developing countries will achieve Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 or 5 by 2015, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in The Lancet.

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No Long-Term Cognitive Effect of Fatty Acids Found in Infants

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) supplementation has no effect on children's cognition after age 9; however, a high percentage of breastfeeding and exposure to higher levels of LCPUFA during the first 14 months is positively associated with child mental development, according to two studies published online Sept. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Work Intensity Similar Across Physician Specialties

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The level of physician work intensity appears to be similar among specialties, with variations in the specific dimensions of stress, physical demands, performance, and temporal demand, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Medical Care.

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Physical Activity Ups Teen Smoking-Cessation Success

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adding physical activity to a youth smoking-cessation program is likely to enhance smoking cessation rates, particularly among boys, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Higher BMI Tied to Peer, Emotional Problems in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Children at ages 4 to 5 years with a higher body mass index (BMI) show worse peer relations and emotional problems at ages 8 to 9, but not other childhood mental problems, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Child Abuse Head Trauma Rates Increase During Recession

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of abusive head trauma (AHT) in children increased significantly in three U.S. geographic regions during the recent economic recession, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Pediatrics.

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White Coat Adherence Seen in Children With Type 1 Diabetes

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For children with type 1 diabetes, those with low levels of hemoglobin A1c (A1C) may be more likely to increase the frequency of blood glucose monitoring (BGM) prior to a scheduled visit to the clinic, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in Diabetes Care.

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Hospital Births More Than Halve Neonatal Deaths in China

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The implementation of a large-scale, facility-based strategy of intrapartum care and hospital births significantly reduced neonatal mortality in China between 1996 and 2008, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in The Lancet.

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Child Self-Exposure to Meds Explains Most Drug Poisoning

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Child self-exposure to prescription medications was responsible for 95 percent of the cases of pediatric pharmaceutical poisonings between 2001 and 2008, with the greatest resource use and morbidity due to self-ingestion of prescription products, including opioids, sedative-hypnotics, and cardiovascular agents, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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CDC: Recent Influenza Activity Relatively Low

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza activity was relatively low worldwide over the summer of 2011, but vaccination remains an important criteria for keeping influenza under control and preventing potentially serious, even fatal, complications, according to two articles published in the Sept. 16 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Malaria Vaccine Does Not Protect Against Clinical Malaria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The malaria vaccine, FMP 2.1/AS02A, based on apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum does not provide significant protection against clinical malaria, but may have strain-specific efficacy against parasites with AMA1 corresponding to that of the vaccine strain, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Many Mistakenly Believe FDA OKs Only Safe, Effective Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of the U.S. public mistakenly believes that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves only effective and safe drugs, but providing consumer explanations can lead to better drug choices, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Congenital Heart Disease Ups Endotoxemia Risk in Children

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease are at an increased risk of intestinal mucosal injury, endotoxemia, and activation of endotoxin signaling pathways that are associated with adverse outcome, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Febrile Seizures Tied to Systemic Respiratory Alkalosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Febrile seizures (FS) in children are associated with systemic respiratory alkalosis, and the lack of FS in children with gastroenteritis (GE) may be attributable to the low pH in GE, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in Epilepsia.

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Supply Chain Optimization Feasible in Pediatric Hospitals

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Optimization of the supply chain process is feasible in a pediatric perioperative setting, according to a study published in the September issue of the AORN Journal.

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Hospitalizations for Eating Disorders Up Over Last Decade

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Although hospitalizations with a principal or secondary eating-disorder diagnosis increased by 24 percent from 1999-2000 to 2008-2009, there has been a decrease in hospitalizations with a principal diagnosis of eating disorder from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009, according to a statistical brief based on data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) published online Sept. 8 by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Climate Change Model Predicts Increase in Childhood Asthma

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Global-to-regional climate and atmospheric chemistry models predict an increase of 7.3 percent in emergency department presentations for regional summer ozone-related asthma in children aged 0 to 17 years across the New York City metropolitan region by the 2020s, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Persistent Asthma Diagnosis Tied to Late-Preterm Birth

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Late preterm birth is correlated with an increased diagnosis of persistent asthma, use of inhaled corticosteroids, and more acute respiratory visits, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Psychosocial Variables Affect Weight Loss in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children's long-term failure in weight reduction can be predicted by maternal insecure attachment attitudes, maternal depression, and psychosocial family risks, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Fast-Paced TV Impairs Executive Function in Prechoolers

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Watching fast-paced television shows is associated with immediate impairment in the executive function of children aged 4 years, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Competitive Video Games Increase Aggressive Behavior

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Competitive video games produce higher levels of aggressive behavior regardless of the amount of violent content inherent in the game, according to a study published online Aug. 15 in Psychology of Violence.

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MRI Identifies Brain Region Differences in Autism

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The brains of children with autism exhibit different structural organization in multiple regions, which can be distinguished using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in Biological Psychiatry.

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Child's Death Ups Mortality Risk in Bereaved Parents

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Parents experiencing stillbirth or death of an infant during the first year of life (bereaved parents) have a significantly increased risk of mortality up to an average of 25 years compared with non-bereaved parents, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in BMJ: Supportive & Palliative Care.

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Oxycodone No Safer Than Codeine During Breastfeeding

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Neonates breastfed by mothers with postpartum oxycodone exposure have a higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) depression than neonates breastfed by mothers exposed to codeine, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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CDC Emphasizes Importance of Flu Vaccine for Pregnant Women

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza can result in dire outcomes for pregnant women and their newborns; proper vaccination and early treatment are critical for optimizing maternal and offspring health, according to a report published in the Sept. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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MRSA Colonization Ups Future Infection Risk in Children

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children with colonizations of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on admission to hospital have an increased risk of subsequent MRSA infection, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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SAMHSA Assesses Recent Trends in Illicit Drug Use

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The use of illicit drugs and alcohol remained similar between 2009 and 2010, but was higher than in 2008, according to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, published Sept. 8 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) at the start of the 22nd annual National Recovery Month held in September in United States.

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Trends in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Seasonality Reported

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In most of the United States, the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) season starts in the fall and continues through early spring, but more specific timing varies regionally; an understanding of seasonal trends can help guide decision making around diagnostic testing and the administration of prophylaxis, according to a report published in the Sept. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Children's Social Goals Predict Response to Peer Aggression

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children's response to peer aggression can be predicted by their social goal orientation with development goals significantly predicting adaptive responses, and demonstration goals predicting maladaptive responses, according to a study published in the September/October issue of Child Development.

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Concentration of Maternal Ether Linked to Birth Weight

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in maternal serum during pregnancy are associated with low infant birth weight, but no association is seen with birth length, head circumference, or gestational duration, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Comparative Efficacy Proposed for European Drug Approval

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- New drugs should be compared with existing treatments instead of placebo before their approval in Europe, according to a report published online Sept. 6 in the BMJ.

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Malaria Predisposes Kenyan Children to Bacteremia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Malaria strongly predisposes children to the development of bacteremia in Kenya, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in The Lancet.

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No Reduction in Infections With Immediate Adenoidectomy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are selected for adenoidectomy for recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and undergo immediate adenoidectomy have the same number of infections per person-year as those who undergo an initial watchful watching, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in BMJ.

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Medical Students Show Racial, Cultural Patient Preference

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students may have a preferential bias toward whites and wealthier patients, but this does not appear to influence their clinical decision making or physician-patient interactions, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Odds of Board Certification Vary in New Doctors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Certification of recent U.S. medical school graduates by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) varies across specialties by educational and demographic factors, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many Hospital Staff Uniforms Contaminated With Bacteria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- More than 60 percent of hospital staff uniforms are contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria, including drug-resistant species, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Living With Smokers Ups School Absenteeism in Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Children aged 6 to 11 years living with adults who smoke at home have higher absenteeism from school, with their caregivers' lost wages/time valued at $227 million per year, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Hospitalized Children Exposed to Considerable Polypharmacy

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of hospitalized children are exposed to polypharmacy, with exposure to more drugs significantly more likely among those with rare conditions, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Increased Food Allergen Sensitization in Black Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Black children and those of African ancestry are more prone to food sensitization to multiple food products, with children of African ancestry more likely to develop sensitization to peanuts, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Vaccine Rates Increase Among Children Aged 11 to 12 Years

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccine compliance at ages 11 to 12 years has increased among children, but they often do not receive all indicated vaccines during vaccination visits, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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More Than 50 Air, Paintball Gun Injuries Present Daily to ER

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, an average of 56 emergency department visits per day were due to air and paintball gun injuries, with more visits for males, children, and adolescents, according to an August statistical brief based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project data published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Palliative Coronary Stenting Safe and Feasible in Infants

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery stent implantation is a feasible and safe palliative option in infants and young children with coronary artery stenosis, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions.

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AAP Updates Guidelines for 2011 to 2012 Influenza Control

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Annual universal influenza immunization, with special outreach efforts made to vaccinate people in certain high-risk groups, is recommended to prevent influenza in children during the 2011 to 2012 season, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Increase in Child/Young Adult Stroke Hospitalization Rate

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The rates of hospitalization due to acute ischemic stroke increased in children and young adults of all age and gender groups from 1995 to 2008, except females aged 5 to 14 years, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Antibiotic Prescriptions Down for Pediatric Patients

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of antibiotic prescriptions flowing from pediatric offices has dropped by nearly a quarter since 1993, but the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says this is not enough to address the problem of antibiotic resistance in the United States, according to a report published in the Sept. 2 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Fewer Male Infants Being Circumcised in U.S. Hospitals

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The practice of circumcising newborn males in U.S. hospitals, which increased from the late 1980s to about 2000, appears to be on the wane, according to a report published in the Sept. 2 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Pediatric Vaccination Rates High in United States

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Overall vaccination rates in children are high and have remained stable or have increased since 2009, though disparities persist among the economically underprivileged, according to a report published in the Sept. 2 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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About Half of U.S. Population Consume Sugary Beverages Daily

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately one-half of the U.S. population consumes sugar drinks on a given day with consumption varying with age, gender, racial group, and family income, according to a report published online Aug. 31 by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Child Marriage Tied to Higher Risk of Psychiatric Disorders

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women in the United States who get married before the age of 18 years have higher rates of a broad range of psychiatric disorders, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in Pediatrics.

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Childhood Delayed Gratification Tied to Later Impulse Control

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The ability to delay gratification early in life is indicative of neurological differences which may affect how individuals regulate their behavior years later, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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