Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

September 2011 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: October 03, 2011.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for September 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Position in Social Networks May Predict Adolescent Alcohol Use

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who begin drinking alcohol have more friends and friends of friends who drink, are closer in their social network to more popular people, and interact with more friends and friends of friends compared to adolescents who don't drink, according to a study published in the September issue of Academic Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Topiramate Effective in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Topiramate effectively improves avoidance/numbing symptom clusters and re-experiencing of symptoms in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a study published in the October issue of CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Single High-Dose Psilocybin Linked to Increase in Openness

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A single dose of psilocybin is sufficient to produce significant increases in the personality domain of openness, which persists after a year, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physical Activity Tied to Excess Eating Via Executive Function

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity indirectly modifies eating behavior and may suppress overeating by strengthening executive function, according to a review published in the October issue of Obesity Reviews.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Parents of Children With Down Syndrome Happy and Proud

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of parents and siblings of individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are happy and proud of their child/sibling; and those with DS are happy with their lives and love their families, according to three studies published in the October issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics.

Abstract 1
Full Text
Abstract 2
Full Text
Abstract 3
Full Text

Doctors, Patients Identify Tacit Clues in Their Interactions

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Both doctors and patients identify tacit clues as well as judgments based on these clues during video elicitation interviews of health maintenance examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Nonelderly Mental Health Disability Up 1997 to 2009

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported mental health disability in nonelderly U.S. adults has increased slightly from 1997 to 2009, especially among adults who reported disability due to other chronic conditions and a greater level of psychological distress but who had no contact with mental health professionals over the past year, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Slow, Steady Rise in Stimulant Use for ADHD Since 1996

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The use of stimulant medications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has increased consistently since 1996, with greater use in adolescents and decreasing use in preschoolers, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

SSRI With Antiplatelet Therapy Ups Post-MI Bleeding Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with antiplatelet agents, including acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), clopidogrel, or both, is associated with an increased risk of bleeding following acute myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online Sept. 26 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Cytisine More Effective Than Placebo for Smoking Cessation

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Cytisine is more effective for smoking cessation than a placebo, with a better 12-month abstinence rate and seven-day point prevalence of abstinence, according to a study published in the Sept. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fear of Childbirth Tied to Higher Odds of Cesarean Section

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency and elective cesarean sections (CS) are more common in women with a fear of childbirth, even after psychological counseling, according to a study published online July 24 in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

Abstract
Full Text

U.S. Docs Feel They Give More Patient Care Than Required

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many primary care physicians in the United States believe that their patients are receiving too much medical care, and that the pressure to do more than is necessary could be reduced by malpractice reform, adjusting financial incentives, and spending more time with patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Benefits, Harms With Off-Label Atypical Antipsychotic Use

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There are varying benefits and adverse effects from using atypical antipsychotic medications for conditions which do not have labeling and marketing approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (off-label), according to a meta-analysis published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Caffeinated Coffee Reduces Women's Depression Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of depression in U.S. women decreases in a dose-dependent manner with increasing consumption of caffeinated coffee, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Reasons for Referral to Specific Docs Differ Among Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) and medical and surgical specialists differ in their reasons for selecting specific colleagues for referrals, with PCPs more concerned about physician communication and medical record sharing than specialists, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Evidence for Nondrug Childhood Constipation Therapies Limited

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Although there is a lack of high-quality evidence for nonpharmacologic treatments for childhood constipation, there is some evidence of effectiveness of fiber supplements, but not for effectiveness of fluid supplements, prebiotics, probiotics, or behavioral interventions, according to a review published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Racial Discrimination Tied to RBC Oxidative Stress Levels

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported racial discrimination is significantly associated with red blood cell (RBC) oxidative stress, with the association remaining statistically significant for African-Americans but not whites, after stratifying by race, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Circulating Glucose Levels Impact Responses to Food Cues

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Mild hypoglycemia activates limbic-striatal brain regions in response to food cues resulting in a increased desire for high-calorie food, whereas higher circulating glucose levels predict increased medial prefrontal cortex activation, a response which is absent in obese individuals, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Full Text

Schizophrenia, Epilepsy Share Bidirectional Relationship

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Schizophrenia and epilepsy share a bidirectional relationship, with patients with epilepsy more likely to develop schizophrenia, and those with schizophrenia more likely to develop epilepsy, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Epilepsia.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

PKCε Regulates Nicotinic Behavior Response in Mice

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Mice lacking protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) show lower nicotine consumption and decreased conditioned place preference for nicotine, according to an experimental study published in the Sept. 20 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Group Living Homes Provide Good Care for Patients With Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Group living homes for older people with dementia provide good care, and stimulate the values of attentiveness and responsiveness, but residents, family, and nursing staff may disagree on the phases of taking responsibility for care, and performing care-giving activities, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Methylphenidate Hydrochloride Delays Puberty in Monkeys

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Methylphenidate hydrochloride (MPH) delays pubertal progression with impaired testicular descent, reduced testicular volume, and decreased serum testosterone levels in juvenile male rhesus monkeys, according to an experimental study published online Sept. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text

ADHD Symptoms Increase Injury Risk in Fifth Graders

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms in fifth graders is associated with injury risk, although in multivariable analysis the association only remains significant for ADHD symptoms, according to a study published in the September issue of Academic Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Depression Significantly Ups Stroke Morbidity, Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is linked to a significantly increased risk of stroke morbidity and mortality, according to a review published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mortality Up in Hospitals With More Minority Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of in-hospital mortality for trauma patients are associated with the proportion of minority patients in the hospital, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cognitive Behavior Therapy, SRIs Improve OCD Treatment

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) together with serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) is a better treatment for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) than medication management alone, according to a study published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Model Predicts Erectile Function After Prostate Cancer Therapy

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Erectile function two years after prostate cancer treatment can be predicted based on patient and treatment characteristics, according to a study published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetes Ups Risk of All-Cause Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing all-cause dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) than those with normal glucose tolerance, with elevated two-hour postload glucose (PG) but not fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels associated with the increased risk, according to a study published in the Sept. 20 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text

No Long-Term Cognitive Effect of Fatty Acids Found in Infants

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) supplementation has no effect on children's cognition after age 9; however, a high percentage of breastfeeding and exposure to higher levels of LCPUFA during the first 14 months is positively associated with child mental development, according to two studies published online Sept. 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Isaacs
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Guxens
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Work Intensity Similar Across Physician Specialties

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The level of physician work intensity appears to be similar among specialties, with variations in the specific dimensions of stress, physical demands, performance, and temporal demand, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Medical Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physical Activity Ups Teen Smoking-Cessation Success

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adding physical activity to a youth smoking-cessation program is likely to enhance smoking cessation rates, particularly among boys, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Female Genital Stimulation Acts on Distinct Sensory Areas

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Clitoral, vaginal, cervical, and nipple self-stimulation activates specific, distinct sensory cortical regions, according to a study published online July 28 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Child Abuse Head Trauma Rates Increase During Recession

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of abusive head trauma (AHT) in children increased significantly in three U.S. geographic regions during the recent economic recession, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Higher BMI Tied to Peer, Emotional Problems in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Children at ages 4 to 5 years with a higher body mass index (BMI) show worse peer relations and emotional problems at ages 8 to 9, but not other childhood mental problems, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Treatable Disorders Often Misdiagnosed As Creutzfeldt-Jakob

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with potentially treatable disorders may be misdiagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), according to a study published in the September issue of the Annals of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Child Self-Exposure to Meds Explains Most Drug Poisoning

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Child self-exposure to prescription medications was responsible for 95 percent of the cases of pediatric pharmaceutical poisonings between 2001 and 2008, with the greatest resource use and morbidity due to self-ingestion of prescription products, including opioids, sedative-hypnotics, and cardiovascular agents, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Subjective Memory Complaints Herald Cognitive Issues in Elderly

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Specific subjective memory complaints (SMCs) are associated with increased odds of cognitive impairment in older adults, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FUS, TDP-43 Combined Activity Disrupted in ALS, Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The RNA/DNA-binding proteins fused in sarcoma (FUS, also known as TLS) and TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43) function together in vivo in a common genetic pathway in neurons, and mutations in either protein may disrupt the combined activities of both of these proteins in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), according to an experimental study published online Sept. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Abstract
Full Text

Mortality Gap Widening for Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- By 2006, the standardized mortality ratios for individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder was approximately double the population average, with the mortality gap increasing over time, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Mistakenly Believe FDA OKs Only Safe, Effective Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of the U.S. public mistakenly believes that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves only effective and safe drugs, but providing consumer explanations can lead to better drug choices, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Erectile Dysfunction Ups Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Erectile dysfunction (ED) significantly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease, stroke, and all-cause mortality, according to a meta-analysis published in the Sept. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Abnormal Hippocampal Blood Flow Persists in Gulf War Vets

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For Gulf War veterans with specific syndromes, abnormal hippocampal blood flow persists, and in some cases worsens, 11 years after initial testing, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Depression Nondisclosure to Primary Care Doctor Common

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Many adults do not disclose depression to their primary care physicians because of their beliefs, with concern about the physician recommending antidepressants being the most frequent reason for nondisclosure, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Insulin Therapy May Slow Alzheimer's Progression

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Intranasal administration of insulin may delay or improve cognitive decline, functional ability, and cerebral glucose metabolism in adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or Alzheimer's disease, according to research published online Sept. 12 in the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text

Fatherhood Decreases Waking, Evening Testosterone Levels

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Baseline waking testosterone levels are high in men who are likely to become partnered fathers, and both waking and evening testosterone levels decline significantly after men become fathers, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospitalizations for Eating Disorders Up Over Last Decade

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Although hospitalizations with a principal or secondary eating-disorder diagnosis increased by 24 percent from 1999-2000 to 2008-2009, there has been a decrease in hospitalizations with a principal diagnosis of eating disorder from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009, according to a statistical brief based on data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) published online Sept. 8 by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Report

Competitive Video Games Increase Aggressive Behavior

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Competitive video games produce higher levels of aggressive behavior regardless of the amount of violent content inherent in the game, according to a study published online Aug. 15 in Psychology of Violence.

Full Text

Fast-Paced TV Impairs Executive Function in Prechoolers

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Watching fast-paced television shows is associated with immediate impairment in the executive function of children aged 4 years, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Psychosocial Variables Affect Weight Loss in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children's long-term failure in weight reduction can be predicted by maternal insecure attachment attitudes, maternal depression, and psychosocial family risks, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

MRI Identifies Brain Region Differences in Autism

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The brains of children with autism exhibit different structural organization in multiple regions, which can be distinguished using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in Biological Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Child's Death Ups Mortality Risk in Bereaved Parents

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Parents experiencing stillbirth or death of an infant during the first year of life (bereaved parents) have a significantly increased risk of mortality up to an average of 25 years compared with non-bereaved parents, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in BMJ: Supportive & Palliative Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

SAMHSA Assesses Recent Trends in Illicit Drug Use

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The use of illicit drugs and alcohol remained similar between 2009 and 2010, but was higher than in 2008, according to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, published Sept. 8 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) at the start of the 22nd annual National Recovery Month held in September in United States.

Report

Children's Social Goals Predict Response to Peer Aggression

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children's response to peer aggression can be predicted by their social goal orientation with development goals significantly predicting adaptive responses, and demonstration goals predicting maladaptive responses, according to a study published in the September/October issue of Child Development.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Prenatal Program Reduces Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Expectant mothers at risk for developing postpartum obsessive compulsive symptoms (OCS) show lower postpartum levels of obsessions and compulsions after undergoing a cognitive-behavioral prevention program as part of childbirth education classes, according to a study published online July 18 in the Journal of Psychiatric Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms Tied to 9/11 Exposure

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals who were exposed to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC), the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) is higher in those with asthma or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and highest in those in whom both comorbidities are present, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in The American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cognitive, Not Bio, Markers Predictive of Cognitive Decline

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive markers are more effective predictors of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease than biomarkers, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Comparative Efficacy Proposed for European Drug Approval

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- New drugs should be compared with existing treatments instead of placebo before their approval in Europe, according to a report published online Sept. 6 in the BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Odds of Board Certification Vary in New Doctors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Certification of recent U.S. medical school graduates by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) varies across specialties by educational and demographic factors, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Psychogenic Seizure Diagnosis Often Delayed in U.S. Veterans

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to civilians, U.S. veterans suffer a substantial delay in the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), which is associated with greater cumulative antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment, according to a study published in the Sept. 6 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Students Show Racial, Cultural Patient Preference

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students may have a preferential bias toward whites and wealthier patients, but this does not appear to influence their clinical decision making or physician-patient interactions, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Dissatisfaction, Burnout Common in Medical Residents

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Suboptimal quality of life (QOL), overall burnout, and emotional exhaustion are common among internal medicine residents, and are associated with higher levels of educational debt, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physical Activity in Adulthood Ups Midlife Performance

MONDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity across adulthood has cumulative benefits on physical performance in midlife, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text

FDA: Antipsychotic Drug May Cause Severe Allergic Reaction

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The drug label for Saphris (asenapine maleate), an antipsychotic medication, has been revised to warn of the risk of serious allergic reaction in patients with hypersensitivity to the drug, according to a safety alert issued Sept. 1 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Sexual Satisfaction, Quality of Life Tied to Successful Aging

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Although sexual activity and function decline with age, self-rated successful aging and quality of life are positively correlated with sexual measures in older postmenopausal women, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Researchers Ponder 9/11 Health Impact a Decade Later

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- It may be too early to tell how much of an impact the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster and its immediate aftermath had on those exposed, but cancer, death, mental and physical disorders, and spirometric abnormalities appear higher in people who received greater levels of exposure, according to three studies published in the 9/11-themed Sept. 3 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract - Zeig-Owens
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Jordan
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Wisnivesky
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC Evaluates Mental Illness Surveillance Data

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluating mental illness surveillance data may provide important information to improve access to care and improve outcomes of patients with mental health disorders, according to a report published in a supplement to the Sept. 2 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Childhood Delayed Gratification Tied to Later Impulse Control

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The ability to delay gratification early in life is indicative of neurological differences which may affect how individuals regulate their behavior years later, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text

Child Marriage Tied to Higher Risk of Psychiatric Disorders

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women in the United States who get married before the age of 18 years have higher rates of a broad range of psychiatric disorders, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: September 2011 Briefing - Pediatrics Next: September 2011 Briefing - Pulmonology

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.