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Category: ENT | Monthly Briefing

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September 2011 Briefing - Otolaryngology

Last Updated: October 03, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Otolaryngology for September 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Doctors, Patients Identify Tacit Clues in Their Interactions

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Both doctors and patients identify tacit clues as well as judgments based on these clues during video elicitation interviews of health maintenance examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Abstract
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Illness Associated With HEV68 Seen in Clusters Globally

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Human enterovirus 68 (HEV68), rarely reported since it was first identified in the early 1960s, has recently been seen in disease clusters around the world, according to research published in the Sept. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Child Face Mask Approved to Help Prevent Spread of Germs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A child-size, single-use face mask to help prevent the spread of germs in hospitals and other health care settings has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

FDA

U.S. Docs Feel They Give More Patient Care Than Required

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many primary care physicians in the United States believe that their patients are receiving too much medical care, and that the pressure to do more than is necessary could be reduced by malpractice reform, adjusting financial incentives, and spending more time with patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Reasons for Referral to Specific Docs Differ Among Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) and medical and surgical specialists differ in their reasons for selecting specific colleagues for referrals, with PCPs more concerned about physician communication and medical record sharing than specialists, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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MRI-Induced Nystagmus Linked to Labyrinthine Function

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with intact labyrinthine function experience nystagmus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in Current Biology.

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Mortality Up in Hospitals With More Minority Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of in-hospital mortality for trauma patients are associated with the proportion of minority patients in the hospital, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Work Intensity Similar Across Physician Specialties

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The level of physician work intensity appears to be similar among specialties, with variations in the specific dimensions of stress, physical demands, performance, and temporal demand, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Medical Care.

Abstract
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No Benefit of Long-Term Azithromycin for Rhinosinusitis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with persistent chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), low-dose, long-term treatment with azithromycin (AZM) for 11 weeks offers no significant benefit, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Allergy.

Abstract
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Many Mistakenly Believe FDA OKs Only Safe, Effective Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of the U.S. public mistakenly believes that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves only effective and safe drugs, but providing consumer explanations can lead to better drug choices, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Trends in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Seasonality Reported

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In most of the United States, the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) season starts in the fall and continues through early spring, but more specific timing varies regionally; an understanding of seasonal trends can help guide decision making around diagnostic testing and the administration of prophylaxis, according to a report published in the Sept. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Comparative Efficacy Proposed for European Drug Approval

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- New drugs should be compared with existing treatments instead of placebo before their approval in Europe, according to a report published online Sept. 6 in the BMJ.

Abstract
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Many Hospital Staff Uniforms Contaminated With Bacteria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- More than 60 percent of hospital staff uniforms are contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria, including drug-resistant species, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Abstract
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Medical Students Show Racial, Cultural Patient Preference

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students may have a preferential bias toward whites and wealthier patients, but this does not appear to influence their clinical decision making or physician-patient interactions, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

No Reduction in Infections With Immediate Adenoidectomy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are selected for adenoidectomy for recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and undergo immediate adenoidectomy have the same number of infections per person-year as those who undergo an initial watchful watching, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Odds of Board Certification Vary in New Doctors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Certification of recent U.S. medical school graduates by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) varies across specialties by educational and demographic factors, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Researchers Ponder 9/11 Health Impact a Decade Later

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- It may be too early to tell how much of an impact the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster and its immediate aftermath had on those exposed, but cancer, death, mental and physical disorders, and spirometric abnormalities appear higher in people who received greater levels of exposure, according to three studies published in the 9/11-themed Sept. 3 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract - Zeig-Owens
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Abstract - Jordan
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Abstract - Wisnivesky
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