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No Increased MI Risk in Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn’s

Last Updated: October 04, 2011.

 

Patients with ulcerative colitis have increased MI risk on unadjusted but not adjusted analysis

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Patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease do not have an increased risk of first-time acute myocardial infarction compared with general practice patients, according to a study published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) do not have an increased risk of first-time acute myocardial infarction (MI) compared with general practice patients, according to a study published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Mark T. Osterman, M.D., from University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, and colleagues conducted two retrospective studies to compare the risk of first-time acute MI in patients with UC or CD with that of patients from general practice from the General Practice Research Database. In the UC study, 15,498 patients with UC were matched to 144,605 general practice patients (based on age, gender, year of database enrollment, and general practice of attendance), and followed for a mean of 4.7 years. The CD study included 9,829 patients with CD who were similarly matched to 92,987 patients from general practice and were followed for a mean of 4.5 years. Each cohort underwent univariable and multivariable Cox regression analysis after adjusting for age, gender, history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, smoking status, body mass index, and aspirin use.

Compared to general practice patients, the investigators found that the risk of first-time MI was significantly higher in the UC cohort in unadjusted but not adjusted analysis (adjusted hazard ratio, [aHR] 1.11; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.27). Neither the adjusted nor the unadjusted analysis revealed an increased risk of MI in patients with CD (aHR, 1.09; 95 percent CI, 0.89 to 1.34).

"Unlike some other chronic inflammatory diseases, inflammatory bowel disease is not associated with an increased risk of MI," the authors write.

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Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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