Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Orthopedics | Rheumatology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

‘Timed Up and Go’ Test Predicts Nonvertebral, Hip Fractures

Last Updated: October 12, 2011.

 

TUG test performance independent risk factor for incident nonvertebral, hip fractures in older women

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
"Timed up and go" test performance is an independent predictor of risk for incident nonvertebral and hip fractures in elderly women, according to a study published in the Oct. 10 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- "Timed up and go" (TUG) test performance is an independent predictor of risk for incident nonvertebral and hip fractures in elderly women, according to a study published in the Oct. 10 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Kun Zhu, Ph.D., from the University of Western Australia in Perth, and colleagues investigated the role of TUG, a validated predictor of falling, and bone mineral density (BMD) in prediction of incident hip fracture in 1,126 women with a mean age of 75.0 years at baseline. The participants were assessed with the TUG test at baseline and at year one with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry total hip area BMD.

The investigators found that 32.7 and 54.2 percent of participants had slow TUG test performance (>10.2 seconds) and low hip area BMD, respectively. Compared to participants with normal TUG test performance and normal BMD, those with slow TUG and normal hip BMD had significantly increased risks of nonvertebral fracture and hip fracture (hazard ratio [HR], 1.84 and 2.48, respectively). Participants with slow TUG test performance and low hip BMD had a significantly increased risk of nonvertebral fractures and hip fractures (HR, 2.51 and 4.68, respectively). The population-attributable risks of nonvertebral fracture and hip fracture were 19.3 and 32.3 percent, respectively, for slow TUG test performance and normal hip BMD; 31.3 and 50.3 percent, respectively, for normal TUG test performance with low hip BMD; and 30.1 and 55.9 percent, respectively, for both slow TUG test performance and low hip BMD.

"Slow TUG test performance is an independent predictor of nonvertebral fracture and hip fracture," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Long-Term Vitamin E Use Increases Prostate Cancer Risk Next: Financial Conflicts of Interest Prevalent, Under-Reported

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.