Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Critical Care | Nursing | Orthopedics | Pharmacy | Pulmonology | Surgery | Anesthesiology & Pain | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

No Effect of Prophylaxis Type on Pulmonary Embolism Rate

Last Updated: October 14, 2011.

 

Prophylaxis agent, anesthesia type do not affect pulmonary embolism rate post hip arthroplasty

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The rate of pulmonary embolism after total hip arthroplasty does not differ by the type of prophylaxis or anesthesia used, according to a study published in the Oct. 5 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of pulmonary embolism after total hip arthroplasty does not differ by the type of prophylaxis or anesthesia used, according to a study published in the Oct. 5 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Monti Khatod, M.D., from the Kaiser Permanente Baldwin Park in California, and colleagues investigated whether any prophylactic agent could better prevent postoperative pulmonary embolism, and whether the rate of pulmonary embolism was affected by the type of anesthesia used. Data for 17,595 patients without a history of venous thromboembolism who underwent unilateral total hip arthroplasty between 2001 and 2008 were analyzed. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess the rates of pulmonary embolism, fatal pulmonary embolism, and death with respect to the prophylactic agent and anesthesia-type used.

The investigators found that the overall rate of pulmonary embolism was 0.41 percent. Pulmonary embolism rates for various prophylactic methods were: 0.37 percent for mechanical prophylaxis alone, 0.40 percent for low-molecular weight heparin, and 0.43 percent each for aspirin and Coumadin. Pulmonary embolism rates for general and non-general anesthesia were 0.43 and 0.40 percent, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 0.51 percent. Mortality rates were 0.67, 0.64, 0.51, 0.42 percent for mechanical prophylaxis, aspirin, Coumadin, and heparin, respectively. For general and non-general anesthesia, the mortality rates were 0.51 and 0.50 percent, respectively. After adjusting for age, gender, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score, the type of prophylaxis or anesthesia used did not show any correlation with increased pulmonary embolism risk.

"No differences in pulmonary embolism outcomes or death were detected across prophylactic groups and anesthesia types," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: No Metabolic Dysfunction for LGA Delivery Without GDM Next: Vitamin D-Gene Interaction Tied to Food Sensitization

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.