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AACR: Plenty of Fluids Lowers Bladder Cancer Risk in Men

Last Updated: October 25, 2011.

 

More than 2,531 ml liquid intake per day tied to a 24 percent reduced risk of bladder cancer

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Men who drink plenty of fluids have a decreased risk of bladder cancer, according to a study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held from Oct. 22 to 25 in Boston.

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Men who drink plenty of fluids have a decreased risk of bladder cancer, according to a study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held from Oct. 22 to 25 in Boston.

Jiachen Zhou, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., from Brown University in Providence, R.I., and colleagues investigated the correlation between fluid intake and bladder cancer among 47,909 male participants (aged 40 to 75 years at enrollment in 1986) from the prospective Health Professionals Follow-Up Study over 22 years. Data were extracted from a questionnaire that the men filled out every four years regarding their fluid intake.

The investigators found that a high total fluid intake of more than 2,531 milliliters per day correlated with a 24 percent reduced bladder cancer risk. The correlation between fluid intake and bladder cancer was first identified in this group 10 years previously. In the most recent study, this association was present but weaker. The association was stronger among younger men, based on detailed analyses. In addition, as the participants aged, their fluid intake decreased, particularly water.

"The fluids may flush out potential carcinogens before they have the opportunity to cause tissue damage that could lead to bladder cancer," Zhou said in a statement.

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