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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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October 2011 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: November 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for October 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Preexisting Dementia in Stroke Patients Ups Disability

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with stroke, preexisting dementia is associated with increased disability at discharge and lower likelihood of being discharged to prestroke domicile, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of Neurology.

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Switching From IV to Oral Meds Cuts Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who are clinically eligible for oral (PO) medication intake, switching from intravenous (IV) to oral medication can substantially reduce the annual cost of health care, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Clinical Therapeutics.

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Pre-Op Erythropoietin Reduces Need for Peri-Op Transfusion

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Preoperative administration of erythropoietin and an iron supplement significantly reduces the requirement for perioperative transfusion in anemic patients undergoing valvular heart surgery, according to a study published in the November issue of Anesthesiology.

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Thalidomide Effective, Safe in GI Vascular Malformations

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with refractory bleeding from gastrointestinal vascular malformations, treatment with thalidomide is effective, according to a study published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Study Finds Statins Don't Slow Atherosclerosis in Pediatric SLE

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Atorvastatin therapy for three years has no significant effect on atherosclerosis progression, as measured by mean-mean common carotid intima-media thickening (CIMT), in a pediatric population with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Bedtime Medications Offer Better BP Control in CKD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), taking at least one hypertension medication at bedtime results in better blood pressure (BP) control compared to morning medication, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Ghost Authorship Prevalent in About One-Fifth of Articles

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of articles with honorary authorship, ghost authorship, or both is 21 percent, which marks a significant decrease since 1996, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in BMJ.

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Clinical, Genetic Factors Linked to Early Stent Thrombosis

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Both genetic and clinical factors are independently associated with early stent thrombosis, according to a study published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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HPV Infection, Cardiovascular Disease in Women Linked

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women, especially tumor-associated oncogenic HPV, is correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Insomnia Moderately Raises Risk of Myocardial Infarction

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Insomnia symptoms are associated with a moderate increase in the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Circulation.

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Cardiac Troponin Predicts Mortality in Acute Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A sensitive cardiac troponin I (s-cTnI) assay can predict mortality risk for patients with acute heart failure, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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High Rate of Elevated BP Post Pediatric Liver Transplant

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For children who undergo liver transplant (LT), there is a high prevalence of elevated blood pressure (BP) at five to 10 years post-transplant, and this can be predicted by age at LT, decreased calculated glomerular filtration rate (cGFR), and recent steroid use, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Local LV Remodeling Linked to Mitral Regurgitation

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) and wide QRS durations, local left ventricular (LV) remodeling contributes toward development of mitral regurgitation (MR), which can be reduced by cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Sodium-Sensitive Populations Fail to Curb Intake

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all Americans should limit their sodium intake for the sake of their health, but less than 2 percent of those who meet the criteria for sodium limitation actually do so, and most Americans ingest too much sodium, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Drug-Eluting Stents With Abnormal ABI Tied to Mortality

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation, an abnormal ankle brachial index (ABI) is independently associated with one-year risk of total mortality and cardiovascular mortality, but not with risk of stroke, nonfatal acute coronary syndrome (ACS), or newer revascularization, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Intensive Lipid Therapy Lowers Plaque Lipid Content

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Significant decreases are observed in carotid plaque lipids after one year of intensive lipid therapy and continue in the second year, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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High Resource Use Ups Congenital Heart Surgery Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with high resource use (HRU) undergoing congenital heart surgery in pediatric hospitals have higher mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Maternal ACE Inhibitor Use Not Tied to Congenital Defects

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For pregnant women with hypertension, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in the first trimester does not increase the risk of congenital heart defects in offspring compared to no treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in BMJ.

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Heart Failure Hospitalizations Down From 1998 to 2008

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Overall heart failure hospitalization rates in the United States declined significantly from 1998 to 2008, with black men showing the lowest rate of decline, according to a study published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Readmission Risk Models Display Poor Predictive Ability

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most hospital readmission risk models have poor predictive ability, according to a review published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cardiac Device Lead Removal by Laser Safe for Octogenarians

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Laser assisted extraction of leads from implanted cardiac devices (pacemakers and defibrillators) is safe and effective in the octogenarian population, with risks similar to those in the non-octogenarian population, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology.

Abstract
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Aspirin Response in Acute Coronary Syndrome Up Post PCI

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The laboratory response to aspirin improves significantly in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and clopidogrel loading, and correlates with improved clinical outcomes, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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CDC: Coronary Heart Disease Rates Continue to Fall

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary heart disease (CHD) is continuing its steady decline in the United States, according to self-reported data; but there is variation in prevalence by sex, race, education level, and geography, according to research published in the Oct. 14 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Rare Disorders ID'd by NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The extensive application of genomic technology under the U.S. National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH-UDP) helps diagnose complex and rare multisystem disorders, according to a report published online Sept. 26 in Genetics in Medicine.

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Organic Pollutants Up Atherosclerosis Risk in Elderly

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Circulating levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are associated with atherosclerotic plaques and echogenicity of the intima-media complex in the elderly, independent of cardiovascular risk factors, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract

Parental History of Heart Disease for Women With PCOS

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely to suffer from chronic cardiovascular diseases than parents of women without the condition, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in PLoS One.

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Increased Travel Time to Trauma Centers in 2007

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Geographic access to trauma centers in the United States declined from 2001 to 2007, especially in communities with higher numbers of poor, uninsured, African-American residents, and individuals living in rural areas, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Raw Fruit and Vegetable Intake Modifies 9p21 CVD Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Following a diet high in raw vegetables and fruits modifies the influence of chromosome 9p21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on myocardial infarction (MI) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published online Oct. 11 in PLoS Medicine.

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Financial Conflicts of Interest Prevalent, Under-Reported

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts of interest (COI) are prevalent among members and chairs of guideline panels, and are under-reported, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in BMJ.

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Leukemia Drug May Cause Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Sprycel (dasatinib), a drug administered to certain leukemia patients, may increase the rare but serious risk of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), according to an Oct. 11 safety announcement from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

ICD Deactivation Knowledge Lacking in End-of-Life Care

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients and providers require more knowledge about the functions of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and end-of-life options in order to facilitate timely ICD deactivation discussions, according to a review published in the October issue of the American Journal of Nursing.

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Physical Activity Cuts Mortality Risk in Metabolic Syndrome

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with metabolic syndrome, physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of mortality from all causes and from cardiovascular causes, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in BMC Medicine.

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High Chocolate Consumption Tied to Lower Risk of Stroke

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of high levels of chocolate is associated with a reduced risk of stroke, according to a letter published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Restless Legs Syndrome Ups Hypertension Risk in Women

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged women with restless legs syndrome (RLS) are more likely to develop hypertension than women without the condition, and this prevalence increases with the frequency of restless legs symptoms, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Hypertension.

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Septicemia Most Costly Reason for Hospitalization in 2009

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Septicemia was the single most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals in 2009, with expenditure totaling nearly $15.4 billion, according to an October statistical brief based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) data published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Report

Chest Pain in Children Rarely Has Cardiac Cause

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Although chest pain (CP) is a common complaint among children, it rarely has a cardiac cause, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Shift Work Ups Cortisol Levels, BMI in Young Adults

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- For young adults, shift work (work performed out of standard working hours) is associated with long-term elevated cortisol levels and increased body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online Aug. 31 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Exercise Offers Modest Cut in Chronic Disease Risk for Obese

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity has no more than a modest beneficial effect of lowering risk of chronic disease in obese individuals, according to a review published online Sept. 26 in Obesity Reviews.

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Juvisync Approved for Type 2 Diabetics With High Cholesterol

FRIDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Juvisync (sitagliptin and simvastatin) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for people with type 2 diabetes who also have high cholesterol.

American Diabetes Association

Multiple Benefits From Regular Exercise in Renal Disease

FRIDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise significantly improves physical fitness, cardiovascular dimensions, some nutritional parameters, and health-related quality of life (QOL) in adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and kidney transplant recipients, according to a review and meta-analysis published online Oct. 5 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Many Elderly in U.S. Undergo Surgery in Last Year of Life

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of elderly people in the United States undergo surgery in the year before their death, with the rate varying with age and geographical region, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in The Lancet.

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More Minority Patients in Low-Quality, High-Cost Hospitals

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals where the quality is low and costs high (worst hospitals) in the United States care for a higher proportion of elderly black, Hispanic, and Medicaid patients than high-quality, low-cost institutions (best hospitals), according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Membrane Oxygenation Reduces Mortality in H1N1-Related ARDS

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with H1N1-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), referral and transfer to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) center is associated with lower hospital mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Same-Day Discharge Feasible in Select Cases of Elective PCI

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For select low-risk older patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), same-day discharge is not correlated with an increase in death or rehospitalization rates at two and 30 days, compared with overnight observation, according to a study published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Advance Directives Linked to Regional Medical Expenditures

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Advance directives (living wills) specifying limitations in end-of-life care are associated with significantly lower levels of Medicare spending, lower likelihood of in-hospital death, and higher use of hospice care during the last six months of life for patients living in regions with high medical expenditures but not in other regions, according to a study published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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MRI Safe, Feasible in Some With Implanted Cardiac Devices

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be performed safely in certain patients with implanted cardiac devices by using a protocol based on device selection and programming, along with proper electrophysiologic back-up support, according to a study published in the Oct. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Computer-Generated Markers Predict Death Risk Post ACS

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Computationally generated cardiac biomarkers -- morphologic variability (MV), symbolic mismatch (SM), and heart rate motifs (HRMs) -- can accurately stratify the risk of cardiovascular death after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to a study published in the Sept. 28 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Abstract
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Pericardial Fat Volume Tied to Coronary Artery Plaque Burden

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Pericardial fat volume is positively associated with coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden, as measured by plaque eccentricity, in asymptomatic individuals, and this relationship is stronger in men than women, according to a study published in the October issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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No Increased MI Risk in Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) do not have an increased risk of first-time acute myocardial infarction (MI) compared with general practice patients, according to a study published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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Intensified Adiposity Effect on BP in Overweight Children

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The effect of adiposity on blood pressure (BP) in children is minimal until the body mass index (BMI) reaches the 85th percentile, at which point it intensifies, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Hypertension.

Abstract
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