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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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October 2011 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: November 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for October 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Preexisting Dementia in Stroke Patients Ups Disability

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with stroke, preexisting dementia is associated with increased disability at discharge and lower likelihood of being discharged to prestroke domicile, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of Neurology.

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Momentary Positive Affect Tied to Improved Survival

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Positive affect (PA) is associated with survival, with high PA linked to considerably improved survival in older men and women, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Noncarriers of BRCA Do Not Have Increased Breast CA Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Women testing negative for their family-specific BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation (noncarriers) do not have an increased risk of breast cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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GERD Symptoms, Site-Specific Dental Erosions Unrelated

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- There is no correlation between location-specific dental erosions and the presence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms, salivary flow, or bacterial load, according to a study published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Proportion of MELD Exceptions Up From 2002 to 2010

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of liver transplant candidates who are model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) exceptions increased from 2002 to 2010, and since April 2005, exceptions have been associated with a reduced risk of wait-list mortality, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Switching From IV to Oral Meds Cuts Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who are clinically eligible for oral (PO) medication intake, switching from intravenous (IV) to oral medication can substantially reduce the annual cost of health care, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Clinical Therapeutics.

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Pre-Op Erythropoietin Reduces Need for Peri-Op Transfusion

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Preoperative administration of erythropoietin and an iron supplement significantly reduces the requirement for perioperative transfusion in anemic patients undergoing valvular heart surgery, according to a study published in the November issue of Anesthesiology.

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Universal Teen Substance Use Approach Recommended

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends implementing universal screening for substance use, brief intervention, and/or referral to treatment (SBIRT) in order to help pediatricians treat substance use in adolescents, according to a scientific statement published online Oct. 31 in Pediatrics.

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Symptom Profiles Identify Unmet Child Mental Health Needs

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Symptom profiles have been identified that may help detect children with unmet mental health needs, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Complete Remission for Many With Nonsyndromic Epilepsy

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of young patients with nonsyndromic epilepsy (NSE) undergo complete remission, which usually persists, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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Disc Herniation Symptom Duration Tied to Outcome

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Longer pretreatment symptom duration from lumbar disc herniation is associated with poorer outcomes after both surgical and nonsurgical intervention, according to a study published in the Oct. 19 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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ATA: Thyroidectomy Improves Sleep Apnea Symptoms

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical reduction or removal of an enlarged thyroid gland improves obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) symptoms, including snoring, according to a study being presented in the annual meeting of the American Thyroid Association, held from Oct. 26 to 30 in Palm Springs, Calif.

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Paternal Fetal IGF2 Variants Up Maternal Glucose Levels

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Paternally transmitted fetal IGF2 variants are associated with increased maternal glucose concentrations in the third trimester of pregnancy, according to a study published in the November issue of Diabetes.

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Thalidomide Effective, Safe in GI Vascular Malformations

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with refractory bleeding from gastrointestinal vascular malformations, treatment with thalidomide is effective, according to a study published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Self-Reported Knee Function, Pain Worse Than Doc-Assessed

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Following total knee arthroplasty, self-reported American Knee Society pain and function subscores are worse than clinician-assessed scores, but self- and clinician-assessment of the Oxford Knee Score is similar, according to a study published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

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Last Decade Saw Marked Drop in Diabetes-Linked Retinopathy

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of retinopathy in adolescents with type 1 diabetes decreased significantly from 1990 to 2009, according to a study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Long-Term Aspirin Use Lowers CRC Risk in Lynch Syndrome

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of aspirin reduces the risk for colorectal cancer in carriers of Lynch syndrome, according to a study published online Oct. 28 in The Lancet.

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Weight Loss in Obese Tied to Low-Order Cognitive Upturn

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss in obese individuals is associated with low-order significant improvements in executive/attention functioning and memory, according to a meta-analysis published in the November issue of Obesity Reviews.

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IBS Patient-Reported Outcomes Tied to Symptom Severity Ratings

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Pain catastrophizing and somatization affect patients' judgments of pain, bloating, and/or bowel habits, which impact patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a study published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy Safe for Selected Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) can be safe when used for properly-selected women with breast cancer, according to a study published in the November issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Fecal Assays Help Identify Food Hypersensitivity in IBS

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A quarter of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have food hypersensitivity (FH), which can be detected using fecal assays; most accurately with eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) assay, according to a study published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Neurogenesis Indicative of Poor Colorectal Cancer Outcomes

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Neurogenesis is associated with colorectal cancer progression, and is predictive of poor outcomes for patients, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Nonclinical Factors Impact Back Pain Treatment Decisions

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Nonclinical factors, including gender, socioeconomic status, and patient presentation, influence physicians' treatment recommendations for acute nonspecific low back pain, with patient presentation the most influential factor, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of Spine.

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Adipose Tissue Inflammation Tied to Fat Deposition

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) inflammation is not correlated with gender or ethnicity, and is associated with visceral adipose tissue (VAT) deposition, hepatic fat fraction (HFF), hyperinsulinemia, and stimulation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) stress pathway, according to a study published in the November issue of Diabetes.

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Study Finds Statins Don't Slow Atherosclerosis in Pediatric SLE

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Atorvastatin therapy for three years has no significant effect on atherosclerosis progression, as measured by mean-mean common carotid intima-media thickening (CIMT), in a pediatric population with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Cannabinoid Receptor Tied to Cognitive Chaos

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Disrupted temporal coordination of hippocampal and medial prefrontal cortical networks (mPFC) due to systemic activation of the cannabinoid receptor is associated with impaired accuracy during working-memory task performance in rats, according to an experimental study published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Low Income, Less Health Care Spending Ups Stroke Incidence

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Lower per-capita gross domestic product and lower total health expenditure per capita are associated with increased stroke incidence, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Stroke.

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Mice Study: Probiotics Do Not Alter Gut Microbiota Makeup

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of a commercially available probiotic fermented milk product (FMP) does not induce significant changes in gut microbiota composition in human and gnotobiotic mice, but does induce changes in bacterial metabolic pathways, according to an experimental study published online Oct. 26 in Science Translational Medicine.

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Bedside Geriatric Assessment Feasible in Elderly With AML

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Inpatient bedside geriatric assessment (GA) is feasible, and is useful for identifying multiple geriatric impairments in elderly patients initiating chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Gene Variation Tied to Rate of Age-Related Mental Decline

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A valine-to-methionine substitution at position 66 (val66met) of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with the rate of decline in skilled task performance and age-dependent hippocampal volume changes in middle-aged and older healthy individuals, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Translational Psychiatry.

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Ovarian Stimulation Ups Risk of Ovarian Tumors in Later Life

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) is associated with an increase in the risk of ovarian malignancies, especially borderline ovarian tumors, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Human Reproduction.

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Obesity Tied to Impaired Immunity After Flu Vaccine

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Obese individuals have reduced levels of influenza antibody titers and decreased CD8+ T-cell responses 12 months after influenza vaccination, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in the International Journal of Obesity.

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Similar Clinical Impairments for Men, Women Who Binge Eat

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Men and women who binge eat suffer similar levels of clinical impairment, despite an underrepresentation of men in treatment studies, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Briakinumab More Effective Than Methotrexate in Psoriasis

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with moderate to severe psoriasis, briakinumab is more effective than methotrexate, although serious infections and cancers occur more frequently with briakinumab, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Long-Term Moderate, High Stress Ups Male Mortality Rate

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term moderate or high levels of stress in men are associated with higher mortality rates, independent of demographics and health behavior habits, according to a study published in the Journal of Aging Research.

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Hormonal Alterations Persist One Year After Weight Loss

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Altered levels of several peripheral hormones involved in the homeostatic regulation of body weight persist more than one year after initial weight reduction, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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No Lung Cancer Mortality Drop With Chest X-Ray Screening

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Annual lung cancer screening with chest radiographs for four years does not significantly decrease lung cancer mortality compared to usual care, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians, held from Oct. 22 to 26 in Honolulu.

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Bedtime Medications Offer Better BP Control in CKD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), taking at least one hypertension medication at bedtime results in better blood pressure (BP) control compared to morning medication, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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qHPV Vaccine Efficacious in Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine is safe and efficacious against anal intraepithelial neoplasia in men who have sex with men, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Small Airway Obstruction Heralds Emphysema in COPD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The number of airways with a diameter of 2 to 2.5 mm is significantly reduced in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the narrowing and disappearance of small-airways precedes emphysematous destruction, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Newer Progestogen Types in the Pill Tied to Higher VTE Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Women who use oral contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, or drospirenone have an increased risk of first-ever venous thromboembolism (VTE), compared to users of oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in BMJ.

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Evidence Suggests Variable Effectiveness for Flu Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccines provide variable effectiveness and efficacy in young children and adults, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Yoga As Effective As Stretching for Chronic Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For primary care patients with chronic low back pain, yoga is as effective as conventional stretching exercises and more effective than a self-care book for improving function and reducing symptoms, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Drinking Non-Diet Soda Tied to Violent Behavior Among Teens

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Soft drink consumption among adolescents is significantly associated with weapon possession and with perpetration of violence against peers, family members, and dates, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Injury Prevention.

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Smoking Rarely Cited As Cause of Death on Death Certificates

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors rarely cite smoking as the cause of death (COD) on death certificates, even in cases where there is a strong causal link to smoking, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Pathology.

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Ghost Authorship Prevalent in About One-Fifth of Articles

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of articles with honorary authorship, ghost authorship, or both is 21 percent, which marks a significant decrease since 1996, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in BMJ.

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Mortgage Default Associated With Worse Health Status

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Falling behind in mortgage payments is correlated with elevated depressive symptoms, food insecurity, and cost-related medication nonadherence, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Low-Dose Lung Cancer CT Screens May Help Identify COPD

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose inspiratory and expiratory lung cancer screening computed tomography (CT) scans can be used to identify chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC Recommends HPV Vaccination in Males

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Young males should receive routine vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a recommendation announced Oct. 25 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Traumatic Brain Injury Lowers Children's Quality of Life

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and children with mild TBI with an intracranial hemorrhage have a considerable reduction in their quality of life, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Radiographic Osteoarthritis Phenotypes Linked to Race

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- African-Americans are less likely to have hand radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA) phenotypes, but are more likely to have knee rOA phenotypes involving the tibiofemoral joints (TFJ), according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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New Estimates of Rotavirus-Attributable Diarrhea Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Worldwide in 2008, 453,000 deaths in children younger than 5 years old resulted from diarrhea attributable to rotavirus, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 25 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Foley Catheter Labor Induction Safer Than Prostaglandin Gel

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women who undergo labor induction with a Foley catheter have a comparable cesarean section rate but fewer side effects than women induced with vaginal prostaglandin E2 gel, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in The Lancet.

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First Versions of Generic Zyprexa Approved

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic versions of Zyprexa (olanzapine) have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, the agency said Monday.

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HPV Infection, Cardiovascular Disease in Women Linked

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women, especially tumor-associated oncogenic HPV, is correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Pre-Op Regimen Tolerable for Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Use of neoadjuvant oxaliplatin, protracted-infusion fluorouracil (PI-FU), and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is tolerable for esophageal adenocarcinoma, but fails to achieve the predefined pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Insomnia Moderately Raises Risk of Myocardial Infarction

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Insomnia symptoms are associated with a moderate increase in the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Circulation.

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Excision Margin of 2 cm Safe in Melanoma Thicker Than 2 mm

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with cutaneous melanoma thicker than 2 mm, a surgical excision margin of 2 cm is sufficient and has similar overall survival as with a 4-cm excision margin, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in The Lancet.

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In Utero Bisphenol A Exposure Impacts Toddler's Behavior

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure during pregnancy is associated with anxious and depressed behavior and impaired emotional regulation at 3 years of age, especially among girls, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Pediatrics.

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LABA Use Ups Risk of Serious Asthma Events in Children

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of long acting β²-adrenergic receptor agonists (LABAs) in children increases the risk for an excess of serious asthma-related events, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Breast Reconstruction Ups Psychosocial, Sexual Health

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women undergoing autologous tissue breast reconstruction experience significant gains in breast satisfaction, and psychological and sexual well-being as early as three weeks post surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Cancer.

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Immunotherapy-Chemo Combo Improves Survival in NSCLC

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with advanced non-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC), combining TG4010 immunotherapy with standard chemotherapy improves six-month progression-free survival (PFS), according to a study published online Oct. 22 in The Lancet Oncology.

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New Method Improves Renal Transplant Biopsy Accuracy

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adding molecular phenotyping to histological classification of kidney transplantation biopsies facilitates more accurate classification of borderline rejection biopsies, and helps eliminate this category in most cases, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Successful Pregnancy Feasible After Kidney Transplantation

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy after kidney transplantation is associated with an increased live birth rate, lower miscarriage rate, and higher rate of complications compared to the general U.S. population, according to a study published online July 27 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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High Rate of Elevated BP Post Pediatric Liver Transplant

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For children who undergo liver transplant (LT), there is a high prevalence of elevated blood pressure (BP) at five to 10 years post-transplant, and this can be predicted by age at LT, decreased calculated glomerular filtration rate (cGFR), and recent steroid use, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Vulvar Lesions Should Always Be Indication for Treatment

FRIDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), a problem that appears to be on the rise in women in their 40s, should always receive treatment, according to a joint committee opinion issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology and published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Cardiac Troponin Predicts Mortality in Acute Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A sensitive cardiac troponin I (s-cTnI) assay can predict mortality risk for patients with acute heart failure, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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CLIP-170 Mediates Paclitaxel Sensitivity in Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- CLIP-170 regulates paclitaxel sensitivity in breast cancer cells by mediating the effects of paclitaxel on microtubule assembly, mitosis, and apoptosis, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in The Journal of Pathology.

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Early Impact of RA on Women's Daily Activities, Occupation

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), daily activities and occupational identity are affected in the first 12 months after diagnosis, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Cough Predicts Idiopathic Lung Fibrosis Disease Progression

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Cough is common in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and is an independent predictor of disease progression, according to a study published in the August issue of Respirology.

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Multiple Hormones Influence Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of sex and growth hormones are known to increase the risk of breast cancer, and it appears that other hormones circulating at high levels may also have a profound influence on the likelihood that a woman will develop postmenopausal breast cancer, according to research published online Oct. 21 in Breast Cancer Research.

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No Link Found Between Cell Phone Use and Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In what may be the largest study to date evaluating cancer risk in cell phone subscribers, Danish researchers have found no evidence of increased central nervous system tumor rates in long-term holders of cell phone subscriptions; their findings have been published online Oct. 20 in BMJ.

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Letrozole Monotherapy Shows Breast CA Long-Term Benefits

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer, letrozole monotherapy reduces breast cancer recurrence and mortality in the long-term more effectively than tamoxifen monotherapy, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Trabecular Bone Texture Predicts Arthritis Progression

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Automated analysis of tibial trabecular bone (TB) texture in individuals with or without radiographic knee osteoarthritis shows promise for predicting progressive tibiofemoral joint space loss, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Predictors of Infant Adiposity in GDM Tied to Fetal Sex

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the determinants of neonatal adiposity differ according to gender, with glycemia and maternal body mass index (BMI) being primary predictors of adiposity in male and female infants, respectively, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Dopamine Polymorphisms Tied to Methylphenidate Response

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) polymorphisms may be correlated with dose-response variability to methylphenidate (MPH) in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Local LV Remodeling Linked to Mitral Regurgitation

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) and wide QRS durations, local left ventricular (LV) remodeling contributes toward development of mitral regurgitation (MR), which can be reduced by cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Ultrasound, Shock Wave Not Effective for Low Back Pain

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The available evidence does not support the effectiveness of ultrasound or shock wave for treating low back pain (LBP), according to a review published in the October issue of The Spine Journal.

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Sodium-Sensitive Populations Fail to Curb Intake

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all Americans should limit their sodium intake for the sake of their health, but less than 2 percent of those who meet the criteria for sodium limitation actually do so, and most Americans ingest too much sodium, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Tdap Vaccinations Recommended for Families With Newborns

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Infants 2 years old and younger cannot be vaccinated against pertussis, so other strategies are needed to protect this age group from the potentially fatal condition; therefore, tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) booster vaccines are being recommended for those who have close contact with infants, according to a report published in the Oct. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Social Network Size Associated With Brain Structure

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The size of a person's online social network is associated with the gray matter density of specific regions in the brain, and these regions are specific to Web-based networks rather than real-world social networks, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

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Article Collection Sheds Light on U.S. Melanoma Trends

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, and melanoma, the third-most common form of skin cancer, may strike more than 45,000 people annually, according to a recent supplement published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Postnatal Steroids Mar Preterm Infant Cerebellar Growth

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal glucocorticoid exposure increases the risk of cerebellar growth impairment in preterm neonates; and a small molecular agonist of the Sonic hedgehog-Smoothened (Shh-Smo) signaling pathway (SAG) protects against postnatal glucocorticoid-induced cerebellar injury in neonatal mice, according to two studies published in the Oct. 19 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Drug-Eluting Stents With Abnormal ABI Tied to Mortality

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation, an abnormal ankle brachial index (ABI) is independently associated with one-year risk of total mortality and cardiovascular mortality, but not with risk of stroke, nonfatal acute coronary syndrome (ACS), or newer revascularization, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Breastfeeding No Balm for Pain in Preterm Infants

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding preterm infants during minor painful procedures does not appear to serve a palliative function, but it also does not appear to thwart the subsequent development of an infant's breastfeeding skills, according to research published in the November issue of Pain.

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Low Lethal Potential for Atypical Spitz Tumors

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Atypical Spitz tumors (ASTs) are associated with a favorable prognosis, an increased melanoma risk, and a moderate risk of metastasis to regional nodes, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Platelet-Rich Fibrin Matrix Shots Induce Cellular Changes

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM) into the deep dermis and immediate subdermis stimulates cellular changes, including activated fibroblasts, new collagen deposition, new blood vessel development, intradermal adipocyte collection, and subdermal adipocyte stimulation, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Oropharyngeal Exam Confirms Obstructive Sleep Apnea

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The Friedman tongue position (FTP) score on oropharyngeal examination confirms obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and is associated with its severity, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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IBD Increases Risk of Post-Op Thromboembolism

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing postoperative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), with a higher risk in those undergoing nonintestinal surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Intensive Lipid Therapy Lowers Plaque Lipid Content

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Significant decreases are observed in carotid plaque lipids after one year of intensive lipid therapy and continue in the second year, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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3-D CT Useful for Classification of Ligament Ossification

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Use of three-dimensional computed tomography (3-D CT) to visualize ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) can aid with classification of lesions, according to a study published in the October issue of The Spine Journal.

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Antidepressants Used by About 11 Percent of Americans

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately one out of 10 Americans aged 12 and over take antidepressant medications, the use of which is most prevalent in women aged 40 to 59, according to an October data brief released by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Neighborhood Poverty Level Linked to Obesity, Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Moving from a neighborhood with a high level of poverty to one with a low level of poverty is associated with a slight reduction in the prevalence of extreme obesity and diabetes, according to a study published in the Oct. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Early Initiation of ART After TB Treatment Ups Survival

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with HIV and tuberculosis, initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) early after starting tuberculosis treatment improves survival in those with CD4+ T-cell counts of less than 50/mm³, according to three studies published in the Oct. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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