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Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

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October 2011 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: November 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for October 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Switching From IV to Oral Meds Cuts Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who are clinically eligible for oral (PO) medication intake, switching from intravenous (IV) to oral medication can substantially reduce the annual cost of health care, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Clinical Therapeutics.

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Proportion of MELD Exceptions Up From 2002 to 2010

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of liver transplant candidates who are model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) exceptions increased from 2002 to 2010, and since April 2005, exceptions have been associated with a reduced risk of wait-list mortality, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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GERD Symptoms, Site-Specific Dental Erosions Unrelated

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- There is no correlation between location-specific dental erosions and the presence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms, salivary flow, or bacterial load, according to a study published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Thalidomide Effective, Safe in GI Vascular Malformations

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with refractory bleeding from gastrointestinal vascular malformations, treatment with thalidomide is effective, according to a study published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Long-Term Aspirin Use Lowers CRC Risk in Lynch Syndrome

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of aspirin reduces the risk for colorectal cancer in carriers of Lynch syndrome, according to a study published online Oct. 28 in The Lancet.

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Neurogenesis Indicative of Poor Colorectal Cancer Outcomes

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Neurogenesis is associated with colorectal cancer progression, and is predictive of poor outcomes for patients, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Fecal Assays Help Identify Food Hypersensitivity in IBS

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A quarter of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have food hypersensitivity (FH), which can be detected using fecal assays; most accurately with eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) assay, according to a study published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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IBS Patient-Reported Outcomes Tied to Symptom Severity Ratings

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Pain catastrophizing and somatization affect patients' judgments of pain, bloating, and/or bowel habits, which impact patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a study published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Mice Study: Probiotics Do Not Alter Gut Microbiota Makeup

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of a commercially available probiotic fermented milk product (FMP) does not induce significant changes in gut microbiota composition in human and gnotobiotic mice, but does induce changes in bacterial metabolic pathways, according to an experimental study published online Oct. 26 in Science Translational Medicine.

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qHPV Vaccine Efficacious in Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine is safe and efficacious against anal intraepithelial neoplasia in men who have sex with men, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ghost Authorship Prevalent in About One-Fifth of Articles

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of articles with honorary authorship, ghost authorship, or both is 21 percent, which marks a significant decrease since 1996, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in BMJ.

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New Estimates of Rotavirus-Attributable Diarrhea Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Worldwide in 2008, 453,000 deaths in children younger than 5 years old resulted from diarrhea attributable to rotavirus, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 25 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Pre-Op Regimen Tolerable for Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Use of neoadjuvant oxaliplatin, protracted-infusion fluorouracil (PI-FU), and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is tolerable for esophageal adenocarcinoma, but fails to achieve the predefined pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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High Rate of Elevated BP Post Pediatric Liver Transplant

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For children who undergo liver transplant (LT), there is a high prevalence of elevated blood pressure (BP) at five to 10 years post-transplant, and this can be predicted by age at LT, decreased calculated glomerular filtration rate (cGFR), and recent steroid use, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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IBD Increases Risk of Post-Op Thromboembolism

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing postoperative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), with a higher risk in those undergoing nonintestinal surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Deletion in ADAM17 Connected to Skin, Bowel Disease

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A deletion mutation in ADAM17 may be the cause of a neonatal-onset inflammatory skin and bowel disease, according to a study published in the Oct. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Adjuvant S-1 Improves Five-Year Outcomes in Gastric Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Postoperative adjuvant therapy with oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, S-1, improves overall and relapse-free survival at five years in patients with stage II or III gastric cancer who undergo D2 gastrectomy, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Erectile Dysfunction After Colorectal CA Poorly Managed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Most men who experience erectile dysfunction after treatment for colorectal cancer feel profound distress, do not receive adequate information, and often feel they have been treated poorly by clinicians, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in BMJ.

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Readmission Risk Models Display Poor Predictive Ability

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most hospital readmission risk models have poor predictive ability, according to a review published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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High-Volume Liver Transplant Centers Up Recipient Survival

MONDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Liver transplant centers with high annual procedure volumes use donors with higher mean donor risk index (DRI) livers and have better risk-adjusted recipient and allograft survival than centers with low annual procedure volumes, according to a study published in the October issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Oral Microflora Tied to Chronic Pancreatitis, Pancreatic Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Variations in salivary microbiota are associated with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Gut.

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Blacks Fare Worse Than Whites Despite Same Colon CA Therapy

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with resected stage II and III colon cancer treated with identical adjuvant therapy, blacks have worse overall and recurrence-free survival than whites, but a similar recurrence-free interval, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Obesity Ups Esophageal Cancer Mortality in Never Smokers

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For never smokers with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), obesity is independently associated with deterioration of disease-specific survival (DSS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) after esophagectomy, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Rare Disorders ID'd by NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The extensive application of genomic technology under the U.S. National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH-UDP) helps diagnose complex and rare multisystem disorders, according to a report published online Sept. 26 in Genetics in Medicine.

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Incidence of Adenocarcinoma with Barrett's Esophagus Estimated

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The relative risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma is significantly higher in patients with Barrett's esophagus compared to the general population, with an annual risk of 0.12 percent, according to a study published in the Oct. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Financial Conflicts of Interest Prevalent, Under-Reported

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts of interest (COI) are prevalent among members and chairs of guideline panels, and are under-reported, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in BMJ.

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Colon Inflammation Markers Lower With Ginger Extract

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals at normal risk for colon cancer, ginger extract may decrease certain markers of colon inflammation, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 5-, 12-, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-, 12-, and 15-HETE), when the eicosanoids are normalized to free arachidonic acid, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Septicemia Most Costly Reason for Hospitalization in 2009

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Septicemia was the single most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals in 2009, with expenditure totaling nearly $15.4 billion, according to an October statistical brief based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) data published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Chest Pain in Children Rarely Has Cardiac Cause

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Although chest pain (CP) is a common complaint among children, it rarely has a cardiac cause, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Elevated Liver Function Enzymes Tied to Diabetes Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated liver alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) are potentially useful for predicting the risk of young adults developing diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Diabetes Care.

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Infliximab Improves Clinical Outcome in Ulcerative Colitis

FRIDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with ulcerative colitis treated with infliximab, mucosal healing after eight weeks is associated with improved long-term clinical outcomes and a reduced likelihood of progressing to colectomy, according to a study published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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More Minority Patients in Low-Quality, High-Cost Hospitals

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals where the quality is low and costs high (worst hospitals) in the United States care for a higher proportion of elderly black, Hispanic, and Medicaid patients than high-quality, low-cost institutions (best hospitals), according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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No Increased MI Risk in Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) do not have an increased risk of first-time acute myocardial infarction (MI) compared with general practice patients, according to a study published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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