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Category: Gynecology | Monthly Briefing

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October 2011 Briefing - OBGYN & Women’s Health

Last Updated: November 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for October 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Noncarriers of BRCA Do Not Have Increased Breast CA Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Women testing negative for their family-specific BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation (noncarriers) do not have an increased risk of breast cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Switching From IV to Oral Meds Cuts Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who are clinically eligible for oral (PO) medication intake, switching from intravenous (IV) to oral medication can substantially reduce the annual cost of health care, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Clinical Therapeutics.

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Pre-Op Erythropoietin Reduces Need for Peri-Op Transfusion

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Preoperative administration of erythropoietin and an iron supplement significantly reduces the requirement for perioperative transfusion in anemic patients undergoing valvular heart surgery, according to a study published in the November issue of Anesthesiology.

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Paternal Fetal IGF2 Variants Up Maternal Glucose Levels

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Paternally transmitted fetal IGF2 variants are associated with increased maternal glucose concentrations in the third trimester of pregnancy, according to a study published in the November issue of Diabetes.

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Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy Safe for Selected Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) can be safe when used for properly-selected women with breast cancer, according to a study published in the November issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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IBS Patient-Reported Outcomes Tied to Symptom Severity Ratings

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Pain catastrophizing and somatization affect patients' judgments of pain, bloating, and/or bowel habits, which impact patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a study published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Ovarian Stimulation Ups Risk of Ovarian Tumors in Later Life

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) is associated with an increase in the risk of ovarian malignancies, especially borderline ovarian tumors, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Human Reproduction.

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Hormonal Alterations Persist One Year After Weight Loss

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Altered levels of several peripheral hormones involved in the homeostatic regulation of body weight persist more than one year after initial weight reduction, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ghost Authorship Prevalent in About One-Fifth of Articles

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of articles with honorary authorship, ghost authorship, or both is 21 percent, which marks a significant decrease since 1996, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in BMJ.

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Newer Progestogen Types in the Pill Tied to Higher VTE Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Women who use oral contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, or drospirenone have an increased risk of first-ever venous thromboembolism (VTE), compared to users of oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in BMJ.

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Foley Catheter Labor Induction Safer Than Prostaglandin Gel

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women who undergo labor induction with a Foley catheter have a comparable cesarean section rate but fewer side effects than women induced with vaginal prostaglandin E2 gel, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in The Lancet.

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Capecitabine First-Line Option in Advanced Breast Cancer Therapy

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Capecitabine is a good first-line treatment alternative to cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) for some women with advanced breast cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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HPV Infection, Cardiovascular Disease in Women Linked

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women, especially tumor-associated oncogenic HPV, is correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Successful Pregnancy Feasible After Kidney Transplantation

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy after kidney transplantation is associated with an increased live birth rate, lower miscarriage rate, and higher rate of complications compared to the general U.S. population, according to a study published online July 27 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Breast Reconstruction Ups Psychosocial, Sexual Health

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women undergoing autologous tissue breast reconstruction experience significant gains in breast satisfaction, and psychological and sexual well-being as early as three weeks post surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Cancer.

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In Utero Bisphenol A Exposure Impacts Toddler's Behavior

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure during pregnancy is associated with anxious and depressed behavior and impaired emotional regulation at 3 years of age, especially among girls, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Vulvar Lesions Should Always Be Indication for Treatment

FRIDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), a problem that appears to be on the rise in women in their 40s, should always receive treatment, according to a joint committee opinion issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology and published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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CLIP-170 Mediates Paclitaxel Sensitivity in Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- CLIP-170 regulates paclitaxel sensitivity in breast cancer cells by mediating the effects of paclitaxel on microtubule assembly, mitosis, and apoptosis, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in The Journal of Pathology.

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Predictors of Infant Adiposity in GDM Tied to Fetal Sex

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the determinants of neonatal adiposity differ according to gender, with glycemia and maternal body mass index (BMI) being primary predictors of adiposity in male and female infants, respectively, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Letrozole Monotherapy Shows Breast CA Long-Term Benefits

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer, letrozole monotherapy reduces breast cancer recurrence and mortality in the long-term more effectively than tamoxifen monotherapy, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Multiple Hormones Influence Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of sex and growth hormones are known to increase the risk of breast cancer, and it appears that other hormones circulating at high levels may also have a profound influence on the likelihood that a woman will develop postmenopausal breast cancer, according to research published online Oct. 21 in Breast Cancer Research.

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Postnatal Steroids Mar Preterm Infant Cerebellar Growth

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal glucocorticoid exposure increases the risk of cerebellar growth impairment in preterm neonates; and a small molecular agonist of the Sonic hedgehog-Smoothened (Shh-Smo) signaling pathway (SAG) protects against postnatal glucocorticoid-induced cerebellar injury in neonatal mice, according to two studies published in the Oct. 19 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Abstract - Tam
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Abstract - Heine
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Tdap Vaccinations Recommended for Families With Newborns

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Infants 2 years old and younger cannot be vaccinated against pertussis, so other strategies are needed to protect this age group from the potentially fatal condition; therefore, tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) booster vaccines are being recommended for those who have close contact with infants, according to a report published in the Oct. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Breast Cancer Recurrence Halved by Radiation

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The use of radiotherapy appears to dramatically reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence, and somewhat reduce the risk of death from breast cancer, in women who receive radiation after breast-conserving surgery, according to the results of a meta-analysis published online Oct. 20 in The Lancet.

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Smoking and Inactivity Down in Women of Childbearing Age

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Among women of reproductive age, the prevalence of two risk factors for poor outcomes in pregnancy and health in general have fallen, but other risk factors and chronic conditions have stayed the same or grown, according to research published in the November issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Maternal ACE Inhibitor Use Not Tied to Congenital Defects

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For pregnant women with hypertension, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in the first trimester does not increase the risk of congenital heart defects in offspring compared to no treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in BMJ.

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Readmission Risk Models Display Poor Predictive Ability

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most hospital readmission risk models have poor predictive ability, according to a review published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Characteristics Identified

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- There are unique characteristics associated with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) in both BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Evidence Favors Cytology, Not HPV Screening, for Cervical CA

MONDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence favors the use of liquid-based cytology (LBC) or conventional cytology rather than human papillomavirus (HPV) screening for cervical cancer; and cervical cancer screening should begin at age 21 years and end at age 65 years, according to two reviews published online Oct. 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Whitlock
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False-Positive Recall for Most After 10 Years of Mammograms

MONDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- After 10 years of annual mammography screening for breast cancer, more than 60 percent of women will receive at least one false-positive recall; and, breast cancer detection rates in women aged 50 to 79 years are similar with digital or film-screen mammography, according to two studies published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Hubbard
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Abstract - Kerlikowske
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Marker IDs Injury in Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

MONDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) treated with whole-body cooling have increased serum glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) during the first week of life, which may be predictive of brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Autism More Prevalent in Low Birth Weight Individuals

MONDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Low birth weight (LBW) has been considered a risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and the results of a new prospective study suggest ASDs are indeed more prevalent in people born at low birth weights; the findings have been published online Oct. 17 in Pediatrics.

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DNA Fragmentation in Sperm Tied to Repeat Pregnancy Loss

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Sperm from men whose partners have a history of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) have increased DNA fragmentation and poor motility compared with sperm from men whose partners had recent term pregnancies, according to a study published in the October issue of Urology.

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Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Makes Pregnancy Difficult

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may be at higher risk for difficult pregnancies and deliveries, according to research published online Oct. 13 in BMJ.

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No Metabolic Dysfunction for LGA Delivery Without GDM

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Women without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who have a large-for-gestational-age (LGA) delivery (nonGDM-LGA) do not have postpartum metabolic dysfunction typically seen in women with GDM, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes Care.

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Tension-Free Vaginal Tape Effective in Long Term

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For women with stress urinary incontinence, treatment with tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) is associated with a high long-term cure rate with no adverse effects, according to a study published in the October issue of Urology.

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Rare Disorders ID'd by NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The extensive application of genomic technology under the U.S. National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH-UDP) helps diagnose complex and rare multisystem disorders, according to a report published online Sept. 26 in Genetics in Medicine.

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Parental History of Heart Disease for Women With PCOS

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely to suffer from chronic cardiovascular diseases than parents of women without the condition, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in PLoS One.

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Teen Sexual Activity Unchanged, but Condom Use Up Slightly

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual activity, contraceptive use, and sexual experiences in teenagers were similar in 2002 and in 2006-2010, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Vital and Health Statistics Series.

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Polytherapy With Valproate Ups Fetal Malformation Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of malformations among infants born to women exposed to antiepileptic drug (AED) polytherapy with carbamazepine or lamotrigine in their first trimester is significantly higher than the risk for those treated with the corresponding monotherapies, but only when valproate is included in the polytherapy, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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'Timed Up and Go' Test Predicts Nonvertebral, Hip Fractures

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- "Timed up and go" (TUG) test performance is an independent predictor of risk for incident nonvertebral and hip fractures in elderly women, according to a study published in the Oct. 10 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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BRCA2 Mutations Indicate Better Ovarian Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- For women with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, BRCA2, but not BRCA1 mutation is associated with significantly better overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and chemotherapy response than BRCA wild-type, according to a study published in the Oct. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Exposure to Air Toxics in Pregnancy Ups Preterm Birth

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal exposure to traffic-related air pollutants during pregnancy, especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Environmental Health.

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Prenatal Folic Acid Cuts Severe Language Delay in Offspring

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal use of prenatal folic acid supplementation before conception and in early pregnancy is correlated with a reduced risk of severe language delay in offspring at age 3 years, according to a study published in the Oct. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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High False-Negative Rate for HER2 Status Using Oncotype DX

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Genomic Health's (GHI) Oncotype DX test, a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) assay for breast cancer that uses a method of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), has an unacceptable false-negative rate, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Financial Conflicts of Interest Prevalent, Under-Reported

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts of interest (COI) are prevalent among members and chairs of guideline panels, and are under-reported, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in BMJ.

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Women Remain Distress-Free Long After Genetic Test Results

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Most women do not experience distress several years after receiving BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) genetic test results, but mutation carriers are significantly more likely to experience distress, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Placental Protein 13 Clusters Facilitate Trophoblast Invasion

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Placental protein 13 (PP13 or galectin 13) forms perivenous aggregates that attract and activate maternal immune cells to create decidual zones of necrosis (ZONEs), which facilitate trophoblast invasion and conversion of the maternal spiral arterioles in preeclampsia, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in Reproductive Sciences.

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ERα Autoantibodies Affect Disease Activity in Lupus

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), autoantibodies specific to estrogen receptor α (anti-ERα Abs) interfere with T lymphocyte homeostasis and are significantly associated with disease activity, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Septicemia Most Costly Reason for Hospitalization in 2009

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Septicemia was the single most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals in 2009, with expenditure totaling nearly $15.4 billion, according to an October statistical brief based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) data published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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High Chocolate Consumption Tied to Lower Risk of Stroke

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of high levels of chocolate is associated with a reduced risk of stroke, according to a letter published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Restless Legs Syndrome Ups Hypertension Risk in Women

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged women with restless legs syndrome (RLS) are more likely to develop hypertension than women without the condition, and this prevalence increases with the frequency of restless legs symptoms, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Hypertension.

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Upfront Zoledronic Acid Ups Bone Density in Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women with early breast cancer receiving aromatase inhibitors, treatment with upfront adjuvant zoledronic acid significantly increases bone mineral density (BMD) compared to delayed-start treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Cancer.

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Electronic Records Enhance Care Transitions for Elderly

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of electronic health care record (EHR) systems is likely to enhance communication and patient care during care transitions, particularly for older patients, according to a study published in the October issue of the AORN Journal.

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Prevalence of Sexual Abuse ID'd in Urological Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of sexual abuse (SA) in patients seeking urological care in the Netherlands is 2.1 percent for men and 13.0 percent for women, according to a study published in the October issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Men Are Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes at Lower BMIs

FRIDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Men are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at a lower body mass index (BMI) than women, with a steeper inverse relationship between BMI and age at diagnosis for women, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in Diabetologia.

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Uterine Artery Embolization Beats Surgery in Short Term

FRIDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Women with heavy menstrual bleeding due to symptomatic uterine fibroids show better short-term outcomes with uterine artery embolization than with surgery, while the mid- and long-term results are similar except for higher reintervention rate, according to a review published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Few Pregnant Women Receive Correct Weight Counseling

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A minority of pregnant women report receiving correct counseling in accordance with the 2009 guidelines for weight gain and the risks of inappropriate gain, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Nonanthracycline Trastuzumab Regimen Safe and Effective

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A nonanthracycline regimen with adjuvant trastuzumab is safe and effective for women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Pre-Op Anemia Ups Mortality After Non-Cardiac Surgery

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, even a mild degree of preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day morbidity and mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in The Lancet.

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Oral Acyclovir Improves Outcomes in Neonatal Herpes

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates with herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection and central nervous system (CNS) involvement improve with six months of acyclovir suppressive therapy, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Healthier Maternal Diet Lowers Risk of Certain Birth Defects

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Higher quality of maternal diet is associated with lower risks of neural tube defects (NTDs) and orofacial clefts, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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More Minority Patients in Low-Quality, High-Cost Hospitals

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals where the quality is low and costs high (worst hospitals) in the United States care for a higher proportion of elderly black, Hispanic, and Medicaid patients than high-quality, low-cost institutions (best hospitals), according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Health Risks for Women Exposed to DES in Utero

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Women who were exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol (DES) have a higher lifetime risk for several adverse health outcomes, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Neonatal ICU Stressors Alter Brain Structure, Function

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to stressors in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is associated with alterations in regional brain structure and function in preterm infants, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Breast Cancer Deaths Falling in United States

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, the rate of death from breast cancer has fallen faster for wealthier women than for poor women, who are less likely to get screened for breast cancer, according to a report published online Oct. 3 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Hormonal Contraceptives May Up HIV-1 Acquisition by Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Use of hormonal contraceptives is associated with an increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition by women, and an increased risk of HIV-1 transmission from HIV-infected women to HIV-1 seronegative men, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Recent Rise in Oropharyngeal Cancer Incidence Due to HPV

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The recent increase in population-level incidence and survival of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs) in the United States from 1984 to 2004 is due to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Preterm Birth Associated With Epilepsy in Swedish Adults

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Preterm birth before 37 weeks is strongly associated with epilepsy in Swedish adults aged 25 to 37 years, and is not mediated by cerebral palsy or other comorbidities, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Neurology.

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CERT Expression of Prognostic Utility in Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Following paclitaxel exposure in breast cancer, multidrug sensitization due to depletion of a ceramide transporter (CERT) augments autophagy, resulting in lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2)-dependent death of multinucleated cells, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in The Journal of Pathology.

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Flibanserin Effective Therapy for Hypoactive Sexual Desire

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Flibanserin is a safe and effective treatment for premenopausal women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), according to a study published online Sept. 20 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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