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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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October 2011 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: November 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for October 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Symptom Profiles Identify Unmet Child Mental Health Needs

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Symptom profiles have been identified that may help detect children with unmet mental health needs, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Complete Remission for Many With Nonsyndromic Epilepsy

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of young patients with nonsyndromic epilepsy (NSE) undergo complete remission, which usually persists, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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Universal Teen Substance Use Approach Recommended

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends implementing universal screening for substance use, brief intervention, and/or referral to treatment (SBIRT) in order to help pediatricians treat substance use in adolescents, according to a scientific statement published online Oct. 31 in Pediatrics.

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Switching From IV to Oral Meds Cuts Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who are clinically eligible for oral (PO) medication intake, switching from intravenous (IV) to oral medication can substantially reduce the annual cost of health care, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Clinical Therapeutics.

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GERD Symptoms, Site-Specific Dental Erosions Unrelated

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- There is no correlation between location-specific dental erosions and the presence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms, salivary flow, or bacterial load, according to a study published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Last Decade Saw Marked Drop in Diabetes-Linked Retinopathy

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of retinopathy in adolescents with type 1 diabetes decreased significantly from 1990 to 2009, according to a study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Adipose Tissue Inflammation Tied to Fat Deposition

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) inflammation is not correlated with gender or ethnicity, and is associated with visceral adipose tissue (VAT) deposition, hepatic fat fraction (HFF), hyperinsulinemia, and stimulation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) stress pathway, according to a study published in the November issue of Diabetes.

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Study Finds Statins Don't Slow Atherosclerosis in Pediatric SLE

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Atorvastatin therapy for three years has no significant effect on atherosclerosis progression, as measured by mean-mean common carotid intima-media thickening (CIMT), in a pediatric population with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Cannabinoid Receptor Tied to Cognitive Chaos

THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Disrupted temporal coordination of hippocampal and medial prefrontal cortical networks (mPFC) due to systemic activation of the cannabinoid receptor is associated with impaired accuracy during working-memory task performance in rats, according to an experimental study published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Drinking Non-Diet Soda Tied to Violent Behavior Among Teens

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Soft drink consumption among adolescents is significantly associated with weapon possession and with perpetration of violence against peers, family members, and dates, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Injury Prevention.

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Evidence Suggests Variable Effectiveness for Flu Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccines provide variable effectiveness and efficacy in young children and adults, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Ghost Authorship Prevalent in About One-Fifth of Articles

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of articles with honorary authorship, ghost authorship, or both is 21 percent, which marks a significant decrease since 1996, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in BMJ.

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CDC Recommends HPV Vaccination in Males

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Young males should receive routine vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a recommendation announced Oct. 25 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Traumatic Brain Injury Lowers Children's Quality of Life

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and children with mild TBI with an intracranial hemorrhage have a considerable reduction in their quality of life, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Pediatrics.

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New Estimates of Rotavirus-Attributable Diarrhea Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Worldwide in 2008, 453,000 deaths in children younger than 5 years old resulted from diarrhea attributable to rotavirus, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 25 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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LABA Use Ups Risk of Serious Asthma Events in Children

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of long acting β²-adrenergic receptor agonists (LABAs) in children increases the risk for an excess of serious asthma-related events, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Pediatrics.

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In Utero Bisphenol A Exposure Impacts Toddler's Behavior

MONDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure during pregnancy is associated with anxious and depressed behavior and impaired emotional regulation at 3 years of age, especially among girls, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Pediatrics.

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High Rate of Elevated BP Post Pediatric Liver Transplant

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For children who undergo liver transplant (LT), there is a high prevalence of elevated blood pressure (BP) at five to 10 years post-transplant, and this can be predicted by age at LT, decreased calculated glomerular filtration rate (cGFR), and recent steroid use, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Predictors of Infant Adiposity in GDM Tied to Fetal Sex

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the determinants of neonatal adiposity differ according to gender, with glycemia and maternal body mass index (BMI) being primary predictors of adiposity in male and female infants, respectively, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Dopamine Polymorphisms Tied to Methylphenidate Response

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) polymorphisms may be correlated with dose-response variability to methylphenidate (MPH) in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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No Link Found Between Cell Phone Use and Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In what may be the largest study to date evaluating cancer risk in cell phone subscribers, Danish researchers have found no evidence of increased central nervous system tumor rates in long-term holders of cell phone subscriptions; their findings have been published online Oct. 20 in BMJ.

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Postnatal Steroids Mar Preterm Infant Cerebellar Growth

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal glucocorticoid exposure increases the risk of cerebellar growth impairment in preterm neonates; and a small molecular agonist of the Sonic hedgehog-Smoothened (Shh-Smo) signaling pathway (SAG) protects against postnatal glucocorticoid-induced cerebellar injury in neonatal mice, according to two studies published in the Oct. 19 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Tdap Vaccinations Recommended for Families With Newborns

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Infants 2 years old and younger cannot be vaccinated against pertussis, so other strategies are needed to protect this age group from the potentially fatal condition; therefore, tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) booster vaccines are being recommended for those who have close contact with infants, according to a report published in the Oct. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Social Network Size Associated With Brain Structure

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The size of a person's online social network is associated with the gray matter density of specific regions in the brain, and these regions are specific to Web-based networks rather than real-world social networks, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

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Breastfeeding No Balm for Pain in Preterm Infants

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding preterm infants during minor painful procedures does not appear to serve a palliative function, but it also does not appear to thwart the subsequent development of an infant's breastfeeding skills, according to research published in the November issue of Pain.

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Adolescent IQ Changes Tied to Alterations in Brain Structure

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Verbal and non-verbal intelligence in adolescence changes with corresponding structural and functional alterations in speech and motor-related regions of the brain, according to a letter published online Oct. 19 in Nature.

Abstract
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High Resource Use Ups Congenital Heart Surgery Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with high resource use (HRU) undergoing congenital heart surgery in pediatric hospitals have higher mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Maternal ACE Inhibitor Use Not Tied to Congenital Defects

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For pregnant women with hypertension, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in the first trimester does not increase the risk of congenital heart defects in offspring compared to no treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in BMJ.

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H. pylori Not Detected in Hyperplastic Adenoids

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and other Helicobacteraceae family members do not majorly contribute toward development of hyperplastic adenoids in children, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Vaccine Shows Promise in Preventing Malaria

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- An anti-malaria vaccine undergoing rigorous testing in seven African countries appears to be effective against the mosquito-born illness, according to the preliminary results of a phase 3 trial published online Oct. 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Readmission Risk Models Display Poor Predictive Ability

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most hospital readmission risk models have poor predictive ability, according to a review published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Topotecan Induction Feasible for High-Risk Neuroblastoma

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Addition of dose-intensive topotecan and cyclophosphamide to induction therapy is feasible for patients with newly diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma (HRNB), according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Bariatric Surgery Offers Health Benefits to Patients' Family

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Adult family members and children of patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery experience weight loss and improved healthy behaviors one year following surgery, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Marker IDs Injury in Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

MONDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) treated with whole-body cooling have increased serum glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) during the first week of life, which may be predictive of brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Autism More Prevalent in Low Birth Weight Individuals

MONDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Low birth weight (LBW) has been considered a risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and the results of a new prospective study suggest ASDs are indeed more prevalent in people born at low birth weights; the findings have been published online Oct. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Hypoglycemic Brain Function Different in Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- During hypoglycemia, patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who perform a working-memory task (WMT) have more activation of brain regions and less deactivation of the default-mode network (DMN) than control subjects, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Diabetes.

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Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Makes Pregnancy Difficult

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may be at higher risk for difficult pregnancies and deliveries, according to research published online Oct. 13 in BMJ.

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Vitamin D-Gene Interaction Tied to Food Sensitization

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) increases the risk of food sensitization (FS) in children carrying specific genotypes, according to a study published in the November issue of Allergy.

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No Metabolic Dysfunction for LGA Delivery Without GDM

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Women without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who have a large-for-gestational-age (LGA) delivery (nonGDM-LGA) do not have postpartum metabolic dysfunction typically seen in women with GDM, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes Care.

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Pediatric MRI Meets Minimum-Risk Standards

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric clinical trials meets the minimum-risk standard for physical and psychological injury, but addition of contrast dye or sedation increases the risks, according to a report published in the September-October issue of IRB: Ethics & Human Research.

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Pediatric Asthma Drug Prescriptions on the Upswing

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among children, the use of medications to control asthma nearly doubled in the last decade, while costs associated with all asthma medications more than quadrupled, according to a September statistical brief published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Rare Disorders ID'd by NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The extensive application of genomic technology under the U.S. National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH-UDP) helps diagnose complex and rare multisystem disorders, according to a report published online Sept. 26 in Genetics in Medicine.

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Vitamin D Dependent Pathway Key in Immunity Against TB

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) released by T cells induces multiple macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in in a vitamin D-dependent pathway, according to a study published in the Oct. 12 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Abstract
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Cerebral Cortical Growth Predicts Cognitive Function

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- After preterm birth, perinatal cortical growth between 24 to 44 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA) is associated with global cognitive, but not motor functions in later childhood, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Neurology.

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Teen Sexual Activity Unchanged, but Condom Use Up Slightly

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual activity, contraceptive use, and sexual experiences in teenagers were similar in 2002 and in 2006-2010, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Vital and Health Statistics Series.

Report

Polytherapy With Valproate Ups Fetal Malformation Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of malformations among infants born to women exposed to antiepileptic drug (AED) polytherapy with carbamazepine or lamotrigine in their first trimester is significantly higher than the risk for those treated with the corresponding monotherapies, but only when valproate is included in the polytherapy, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Flu Vaccine With Adjuvant MF59 Efficacious in Infants

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) with the oil-in-water-based adjuvant MF59 is efficacious against confirmed influenza in young children and infants, according to a study published in the Oct. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Financial Conflicts of Interest Prevalent, Under-Reported

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts of interest (COI) are prevalent among members and chairs of guideline panels, and are under-reported, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in BMJ.

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Prenatal Folic Acid Cuts Severe Language Delay in Offspring

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal use of prenatal folic acid supplementation before conception and in early pregnancy is correlated with a reduced risk of severe language delay in offspring at age 3 years, according to a study published in the Oct. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Good Long-Term Outcomes With Selective Thoracic Fusion

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Selective thoracic fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) yields long-term stable spinal balance and lumbar curve correction, with outcome measures comparable to long instrumented fusion, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in Spine.

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Glycemic Extremes Affect Brain Development in Type 1 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), more exposure to hyperglycemia is associated with a decrease in whole brain gray matter, and severe hypoglycemia is associated with greater decreases in occipital/parietal white matter volume, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Diabetes.

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Children More Likely to Have SLN Mets Than Young Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Children and adolescents are more likely to have sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastases than young adults, and SLN biopsy use is predicted by tumor thickness and ulceration, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Cancer.

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High Yield of Viral Diagnoses for RT-PCR in Respiratory Infection

TUESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing has a high yield of viral diagnoses, but rapid communication of results to clinicians has no positive impact on hospital admissions, length of hospital stay, or duration of antibiotic use for children with acute respiratory infections (ARI), according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Septicemia Most Costly Reason for Hospitalization in 2009

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Septicemia was the single most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals in 2009, with expenditure totaling nearly $15.4 billion, according to an October statistical brief based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) data published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Chest Pain in Children Rarely Has Cardiac Cause

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Although chest pain (CP) is a common complaint among children, it rarely has a cardiac cause, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Pediatrics.

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One Peds Dose of H1N1 Vaccine Prevents Child Hospitalizations

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A single pediatric dose of the AS03-adjuvanted vaccine against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 (pH1N1) in children aged 6 months to 9 years confers substantial protection against influenza-related hospitalization beginning 10 days after vaccination, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Recurrent Child UTIs Rarely Cause Chronic Kidney Disease

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The etiologic fraction of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) as the main cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is very small, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Food Ads Impact Child Food Choices Despite Parental Input

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Food advertisements moderately influence the food choices made by children, and parental input only slightly moderates that influence, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Sports-Related Brain Injury Rates Climbing in Youths

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The number of sports- and recreation-related, nonfatal traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in children and adolescents has increased significantly in recent years, according to research published in the Oct. 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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More Minority Patients in Low-Quality, High-Cost Hospitals

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals where the quality is low and costs high (worst hospitals) in the United States care for a higher proportion of elderly black, Hispanic, and Medicaid patients than high-quality, low-cost institutions (best hospitals), according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Healthier Maternal Diet Lowers Risk of Certain Birth Defects

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Higher quality of maternal diet is associated with lower risks of neural tube defects (NTDs) and orofacial clefts, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Oral Acyclovir Improves Outcomes in Neonatal Herpes

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates with herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection and central nervous system (CNS) involvement improve with six months of acyclovir suppressive therapy, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Neonatal ICU Stressors Alter Brain Structure, Function

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to stressors in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is associated with alterations in regional brain structure and function in preterm infants, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in the Annals of Neurology.

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5-HTTLPR Gene Linked to Positive Affect in Youth

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Youth carrying two short alleles of 5-HTTLPR are more susceptible to parenting as environmental context, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Translational Psychiatry.

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Eating Disorders in Children Tied to Serious Health Consequences

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of early-onset restrictive eating disorders is 2.6 cases per 100,000 person-years in children, is increased in girls, and can result in serious medical consequences, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Father's Age Tied to Intellectual Disability in Offspring

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A large majority of rare de novo copy number variations (CNVs) in intellectual disability (ID) have a paternal origin, and certain CNVs are generated with advanced paternal age, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Journal of Medical Genetics.

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Head Circumference Growth Up in Infancy in Boys With Autism

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Boys with autism experience accelerated head circumference (HC) growth, and have increased height and weight in the first year of life, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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High Children's Asthma Care Compliance in Peds Hospitals

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For children admitted with asthma to pediatric hospitals, there are high levels of hospital compliance with Children's Asthma Care (CAC) quality measures for receiving asthma relievers (CAC-1) and systemic corticosteroids (CAC-2), and moderate compliance for discharge with a home-management care plan (CAC-3), according to a study published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Preterm Birth Associated With Epilepsy in Swedish Adults

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Preterm birth before 37 weeks is strongly associated with epilepsy in Swedish adults aged 25 to 37 years, and is not mediated by cerebral palsy or other comorbidities, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Neurology.

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Intensified Adiposity Effect on BP in Overweight Children

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The effect of adiposity on blood pressure (BP) in children is minimal until the body mass index (BMI) reaches the 85th percentile, at which point it intensifies, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Hypertension.

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Early Anesthesia Exposures Tied to Learning Disabilities

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to multiple anesthesia/surgery before the age of 2 years is a significant risk factor for the development of learning disabilities (LDs) later in life, but not for the receipt of an individualized education program for an emotional/behavior disorder (IEP-EBD), according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Pediatrics.

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About One in 10 Parents Use Alternate Vaccination Schedule

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- More than 10 percent of parents of young children follow an alternative vaccination schedule for their child, and approximately a quarter of parents think delaying vaccines is safer or disagree with the recommended schedule, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Pediatrics.

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