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Category: Anesthesiology & Pain | Monthly Briefing

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October 2011 Briefing - Anesthesiology

Last Updated: November 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Anesthesiology for October 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Exparel Approved for Post-Surgery Pain

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Exparel (bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat post-surgical pain, maker Pacira Pharmaceuticals said Monday.

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Switching From IV to Oral Meds Cuts Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who are clinically eligible for oral (PO) medication intake, switching from intravenous (IV) to oral medication can substantially reduce the annual cost of health care, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Clinical Therapeutics.

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Pre-Op Erythropoietin Reduces Need for Peri-Op Transfusion

MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Preoperative administration of erythropoietin and an iron supplement significantly reduces the requirement for perioperative transfusion in anemic patients undergoing valvular heart surgery, according to a study published in the November issue of Anesthesiology.

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Small Airway Obstruction Heralds Emphysema in COPD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The number of airways with a diameter of 2 to 2.5 mm is significantly reduced in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the narrowing and disappearance of small-airways precedes emphysematous destruction, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ghost Authorship Prevalent in About One-Fifth of Articles

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of articles with honorary authorship, ghost authorship, or both is 21 percent, which marks a significant decrease since 1996, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in BMJ.

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IBD Increases Risk of Post-Op Thromboembolism

THURSDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing postoperative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), with a higher risk in those undergoing nonintestinal surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Readmission Risk Models Display Poor Predictive Ability

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most hospital readmission risk models have poor predictive ability, according to a review published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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No Effect of Prophylaxis Type on Pulmonary Embolism Rate

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of pulmonary embolism after total hip arthroplasty does not differ by the type of prophylaxis or anesthesia used, according to a study published in the Oct. 5 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Same Cognition With Cerebral Perfusion, Hypothermic Arrest

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA), antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) confers no additional benefits over deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) for improving cognitive function, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The Lancet.

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Rare Disorders ID'd by NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program

THURSDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The extensive application of genomic technology under the U.S. National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH-UDP) helps diagnose complex and rare multisystem disorders, according to a report published online Sept. 26 in Genetics in Medicine.

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Financial Conflicts of Interest Prevalent, Under-Reported

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts of interest (COI) are prevalent among members and chairs of guideline panels, and are under-reported, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in BMJ.

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Septicemia Most Costly Reason for Hospitalization in 2009

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Septicemia was the single most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals in 2009, with expenditure totaling nearly $15.4 billion, according to an October statistical brief based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) data published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Electronic Records Enhance Care Transitions for Elderly

MONDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of electronic health care record (EHR) systems is likely to enhance communication and patient care during care transitions, particularly for older patients, according to a study published in the October issue of the AORN Journal.

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Early ID of Morbidly Obese Improves Surgical Care

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Early identification of patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 35 kg/m² or more improves perioperative care and outcomes, according to a study published in the October issue of the AORN Journal.

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Many Elderly in U.S. Undergo Surgery in Last Year of Life

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of elderly people in the United States undergo surgery in the year before their death, with the rate varying with age and geographical region, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in The Lancet.

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More Minority Patients in Low-Quality, High-Cost Hospitals

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals where the quality is low and costs high (worst hospitals) in the United States care for a higher proportion of elderly black, Hispanic, and Medicaid patients than high-quality, low-cost institutions (best hospitals), according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Pre-Op Anemia Ups Mortality After Non-Cardiac Surgery

THURSDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, even a mild degree of preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day morbidity and mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in The Lancet.

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Same-Day Discharge Feasible in Select Cases of Elective PCI

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For select low-risk older patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), same-day discharge is not correlated with an increase in death or rehospitalization rates at two and 30 days, compared with overnight observation, according to a study published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Advance Directives Linked to Regional Medical Expenditures

TUESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Advance directives (living wills) specifying limitations in end-of-life care are associated with significantly lower levels of Medicare spending, lower likelihood of in-hospital death, and higher use of hospice care during the last six months of life for patients living in regions with high medical expenditures but not in other regions, according to a study published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sevoflurane Anesthesia Does Not Up Incident Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In cancer-free patients who undergo surgery under sevoflurane anesthesia, neither the duration of anesthesia (TANESTH) nor the time measured with the bispectral index (BIS) under 45 (TBIS<45) are associated with the risk of new malignant disease within five years, according to a study published in the October issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Early Anesthesia Exposures Tied to Learning Disabilities

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to multiple anesthesia/surgery before the age of 2 years is a significant risk factor for the development of learning disabilities (LDs) later in life, but not for the receipt of an individualized education program for an emotional/behavior disorder (IEP-EBD), according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Pediatrics.

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Risk Factors ID'd for Post-Spine Surgery Death, Morbidity

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Older age, wound infections, and other medical comorbidities increase the risk of immediate morbidity or mortality in patients undergoing spine surgery, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Smoking Complicates Joint Replacement Outcomes

MONDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking is associated with higher rates of complications such as infections, stroke, pneumonia, and death following elective total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgeries, according to research published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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