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Dairy/High Protein Ups Bone Health During Weight Loss

Last Updated: November 11, 2011.

 

High protein and dairy diet during weight loss ups bone health in overweight premenopausal women

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Consumption of dairy foods and high protein over 16 weeks of diet- and exercise-induced weight loss improves markers of bone health and calcium metabolism in obese or overweight, premenopausal women, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

FRIDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of dairy foods and high protein over 16 weeks of diet- and exercise-induced weight loss improves markers of bone health and calcium metabolism in obese or overweight, premenopausal women, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Andrea R. Josse, Ph.D., from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, and colleagues investigated the effects of dairy foods, dietary calcium, and protein during diet- and exercise-induced weight loss on bone health markers in 90 premenopausal, overweight and obese women. Participants were randomly allocated to one of three diets: high protein and dairy (HPHD), adequate protein and medium dairy (APMD), or adequate protein with low dairy (APLD). Serum osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D, leptin, and adiponectin were measured at zero and 16 weeks.

The investigators found that equivalent body weight was lost in all groups. The APLD diet was associated with significantly increased N-telopeptide, C-telopeptide (CTX), urinary deoxypyridinoline, and osteocalcin. All resorption markers remained unchanged in HPHD, with significant increases in osteocalcin and procollagen 1 amino-terminal propeptide (P1NP). The HPHD diet showed significant increases in P1NP to CTX and OPG to RANKL ratios, while the APLD diet showed a decreased P1NP to CTX ratio. Compared to APLD, PTH decreased in both the HPHD and APMD diets, while 25-hydroxyvitamin D increased, remained unchanged, and decreased in the HPHD, APMD, and APLD diets, respectively. The APMD and HPHD diets showed increased adiponectin and decreased leptin.

"Hypoenergetic diets higher in dairy foods, dietary calcium, and protein with daily exercise, favorably affected important bone health biomarkers," the authors write.

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