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Self-Reported Eating Rates, Lab-Measured Rates Concur

Last Updated: November 18, 2011.

 

And, food type affects eating rates, which remain consistent between subjects

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Self-reported eating rates (ERs) are a valid measure for ER determination; and food types affect ERs, according to two studies presented at the annual meeting of The Obesity Society, held from Oct. 1 to 5 in Orlando, Fla.

FRIDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported eating rates (ERs) are a valid measure for ER determination; and food types affect ERs, according to two studies presented at the annual meeting of The Obesity Society, held from Oct. 1 to 5 in Orlando, Fla.

Amanda Petty, from the University of Rhode Island in Kingston, and colleagues compared ERs within and between 60 subjects stratified for gender and self-reported ERs (fast, medium, slow). Eating rates were evaluated from an ad-libitum mixed macronutrient lunch, self-recorded standardized breakfast, and a free-living dinner. The investigators found that males ate significantly faster than females. Lab lunch ERs aligned with all three self-reported categories. There was a significant difference between the slow and fast and the medium and fast ER groups. ERs for breakfast and dinner were similar through all categories and there was no correlation for ERs between meals.

Emily E. Ponte, also from the University of Rhode Island in Kingston, and colleagues investigated the association of food type with ER in 129 subjects; 56 of whom consumed a mixed-macronutrient liquid meal, 37 a solid meal, and 36 both. ERs were correlated in individuals who consumed both liquid and solid meals, indicating between-subject consistency. Liquid meal consumption was faster than solid meals. The intake of grams and kilocalories, but not ER, was correlated with pre-meal hunger and palatability ratings for solid meals, whereas for liquid meals, pre-meal palatability ratings correlated with energy intake and not ER.

"These results suggest a need to standardize meals, subjects, and conditions for ER research, and to consider such factors in interventions," Ponte and colleagues write.

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