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American Heart Association, Nov. 12-16, 2011

Last Updated: November 21, 2011.

 

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The American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011

The annual meeting of the American Heart Association was held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla., and attracted more than 18,000 participants from around the world, including cardiovascular specialists, surgeons, and nurses as well as other health care professionals. The conference featured presentations focusing on the latest advances in cardiovascular medicine and surgery, providing insight into the prevention, diagnosis, and management of hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke.

Amiya A. Ahmed, M.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues found that Medicare-eligible older Americans with annual household incomes of less than $25,000 were more likely to develop heart failure or die, regardless of education. As part of the Cardiovascular Health Study, the investigators evaluated the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute records of 5,153 Medicare-eligible older adults without heart failure, separating patients into groups based on education and income levels.

"Older adults with low income who had college or higher education, nearly half of whom were professionals, seemed to have higher risk than those without college education but with annual income of $25,000 or higher," Ahmed said. "Despite Medicare coverage and regardless of education, low income was a significant and independent predictor for new-onset heart failure and death."

Abstract No. 12064

In another study, Christina M. Shay, Ph.D., of Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues evaluated data on 4,166 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and found that women who reported consuming two or more sugar-sweetened beverages per day had a higher risk for increasing their waist size, and nearly four times the risk of becoming high-risk for developing diabetes and high triglycerides, compared with women who drank less than one sugar-sweetened beverage per day.

"What was most interesting is that these associations remained after accounting for their level of obesity at the beginning or whether their weight changed over the time they were in the study. These associations were not statistically significant in men," Shay said. "The influence of sugar-sweetened beverages on cardiovascular risk is complex and may vary between men and women. To reduce or prevent the development of cardiovascular disease, the American Heart Association recommends that all adults and children consume less than 36 ounces (or less than 450 calories) per week of sugar-sweetened beverages."

Abstract No. 8438

David L.S. Morales, M.D., of the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and colleagues evaluated ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation in 74 pediatric patients under the age of 21 years and found that current VAD therapy for children with end-stage heart failure was an effective modality to bridge children to transplant.

"The interest in pediatric VADs is growing and it is an exciting time for this emerging field. As adult technology continues to advance, smaller devices are being developed that can be used in children," Morales said. "Also, the government and industry have refocused efforts for the development of pediatric-specific devices. Most importantly, for the first time, clinicians will finally have available to them a pediatric-specific device (the Berlin Heart EXCOR) which we are confident can support children of all sizes."

Several authors disclosed financial relationships with cardiovascular medical device companies, including Berlin Heart.

Abstract No. 10088

Nicolas L. Madsen, M.D., of the University of Washington in Seattle, and colleagues found that primary care physicians in the state of Washington were not utilizing national guidelines during the cardiovascular portion of the sports medicine screening evaluation.

"Specifically, only 6 percent of physicians surveyed are in complete compliance with the guidelines. The principal reason these guidelines are not being used is because the majority of physicians do not have knowledge of their existence or content," Madsen said. "Despite these guidelines being available and unchanged for the last 15 years, the effort to get these guidelines to the bedside or clinic has not been optimized. Thus, before we update these guidelines and or add more complicated screening evaluations, we really need to get back to the basics and make sure physicians are aware that these guidelines exist and that they build them into their screening process."

The fourth edition of the Preparticipation Physical Evaluation monograph is freely available online and is recommended by the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Pediatrics, and Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning.

"It is urgent that physicians get a hold of this [publication] and utilize this in their practice to standardize the screening process," Madsen said.

Abstract No. 10798

AHA: CYP2C19*2 Carriers Need Triple Clopidogrel Dosing

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with stable cardiac disease who are heterozygous for CYP2C19*2, tripling the standard maintenance daily dose of clopidogrel improves platelet reactivity, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Ideal Cardiovascular Health Tied to Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Ideal cardiovascular health (measured according to the number of ideal cardiovascular health metrics) is associated with lower cancer incidence, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: High Particulates at 'Ground Zero' Up Atherosclerosis Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Workers at "Ground Zero" who were exposed to high levels of particulate matter (PM) on Sept. 11, 2001, have a higher risk for atherosclerosis than those exposed to lower levels of PM after Sept. 13, 2001, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: CHD Risk Factors Common in Patients With First MI

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Although the majority of patients presenting with initial myocardial infarction (MI) have one or more coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, in-hospital mortality in these patients is inversely correlated with the number of risk factors, according to a study published in the cardiovascular disease-themed Nov. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Three Kiwi Fruit a Day Lowers 24-Hour Ambulatory BP

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Eating three kiwi fruits a day is associated with improved 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP), according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Drug-Eluting Balloons Promising Alternative to Stents

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Percutaneous coronary intervention with drug eluting balloons (DEB-PCI) in bare-metal stents (BMS) is a promising alternative to drug-eluting stents (DES) with low repeat restenosis and target lesion revascularization (TLR), and is also feasible in patients at high risk of bleeding complications, according to two studies presented at the 2011 American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Atorvastatin and Rosuvastatin Help Reverse CAD

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Two statins, atorvastatin and rosuvastatin, appear to reverse the progression of coronary artery disease when administered at high doses, apparently by reducing arterial plaque, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: A-Fib in Sepsis Ups In-Hospital Stroke, Death Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who develop new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) during hospitalization for severe sepsis are at an increased risk of in-hospital stroke and mortality, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Notable Weight Loss With Remote, In-Person Support

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Remote and in-person weight-loss interventions and enhanced weight-loss counseling are associated with significant weight loss for obese participants, according to two studies published online Nov. 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Most Major Post-Op Infections Occur Post-Discharge

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Major infections occur an average of 14.5 days after cardiac surgery, with 51 percent occurring after discharge; and preoperative skin preparation reduces the incidence of cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) infections, according to two studies presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Evacetrapib Alone/With Statins Useful in Dyslipidemia

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Evacetrapib therapy alone or in combination with statins increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, and decreases low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, according to a study published in the cardiovascular disease-themed Nov. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Cardiac Stem Cells Do Not Improve LV Function Post-MI

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Intracoronary infusion of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) two to three weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with significant left ventricular (LV) dysfunction after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), does not improve global (LVEF) or regional (wall motion) LV function, according to a study published in the cardiovascular disease-themed Nov. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Adding Niacin Doesn't Beat Statin Alone for CV Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Addition of extended-release niacin to simvastatin offers no additional benefit in reducing cardiovascular risk, according to a study published online Nov. 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with its presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: IQ in Male Teens Tied to Waist-Hip-Ratio in Adulthood

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- IQ values in late adolescence are inversely correlated with waist-hip-ratio (WHR) in early middle-aged men, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Dronedarone Detrimental for Certain A-Fib Patients

MONDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Dronedarone, an antiarrhythmic agent that stabilizes patients with intermittent atrial fibrillation, appears to increase the risk of hospitalization and death in certain patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, according to a study published online Nov. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: ICDs Up Shock-Related Anxiety, Lower Sexual Function

MONDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) who have implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) have a higher level of shock-related anxiety, which is inversely related to sexual function (SF), according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Cardiac Stem Cells Show Promise in Heart Failure

MONDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac stem cell (CSC) infusion improves left ventricular (LV) function and reduces infarct size in a phase I trial in patients with post-myocardial infarction (MI) heart failure, according to a study published online Nov. 14 in The Lancet to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Rivaroxaban Improves Acute Coronary Syndrome Outcomes

MONDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Rivaroxaban, but not adjuvant vorapaxar, improves cardiovascular outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS); and long-term venous thromboembolism prophylaxis with apixaban is safe and effective in medically ill patients post-hospital discharge, according to three studies published online Nov. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Copayment Elimination Ups Post-MI Medication Adherence

MONDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- For patients discharged after a myocardial infarction, the elimination of copayments for medications improves adherence, but does not significantly reduce the rates of first major vascular event or revascularization, according to a study published online Nov. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Single AMG145 Dose Lowers LDL-Cholesterol Levels

MONDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A single dose of AMG145 lowers low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, apolipoprotein (apo)-B levels, and suppresses unbound pro-protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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AHA: Childhood Abuse Predicts CVD Risk in Adult Women

MONDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to severe physical and sexual abuse in childhood or adolescence increases the risk for confirmed cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in adult women, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011, held from Nov. 12 to 16 in Orlando, Fla.

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