Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Gastroenterology | Nephrology | Nursing | Surgery | Anesthesiology & Pain | Urology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Oliguria in Bariatric Surgery Not Tied to Intra-Op Fluids

Last Updated: November 22, 2011.

 

Oliguria in laparoscopic bariatric surgery persists regardless of intra-op fluid administered

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery have low urine output, irrespective of the intraoperative fluid volume administered, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in the Archives of Surgery.

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery have low urine output, irrespective of the intraoperative fluid volume administered, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in the Archives of Surgery.

Idit Matot, M.D., from Tel Aviv University in Israel, and colleagues investigated whether intraoperative fluid management affects urine output in patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric operations. In a randomized control trial, 55 and 52 morbidly obese patients were randomly assigned to receive high (10 mL/kg/hour) or low (4 mL/kg/hour) amounts of Ringer lactate solution intraoperatively, respectively. Urine output was the primary end point, while postoperative creatinine serum concentration and complication rate were the secondary end points.

The investigators found that patients in the high-volume group had significantly more fluids administered than patients in the low-volume group. Low urine outputs were not significantly different between the groups (median, 100 and 107 mL in the high and low volume groups, respectively; P = 0.34). At all times, the mean creatinine serum concentration was within the normal range, with no significant between-group differences (P = 0.68). The low-volume group had a nonsignificantly lower number of patients with complications than the high volume group (seven versus 10 patients; P = 0.60).

"In patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery, intraoperative urine output is low regardless of the use of relatively high-volume fluid therapy," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Similar Specific Survival for Unilateral, Bilateral Breast CA Next: Plasma MicroRNA Panel ID'd for Diagnosing Hepatocellular Cancer

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.