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Temperature-Controlled Laminar Airflow Helps Atopic Asthma

Last Updated: November 29, 2011.

 

Nocturnal temp-controlled laminar airflow improves quality of life, inflammation in atopic asthma

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For patients with persistent atopic asthma, environmental control for one year, using nocturnal temperature-controlled laminar airflow, improves asthma-related quality of life and reduces airway inflammation, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in Thorax.

TUESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with persistent atopic asthma, environmental control for one year, using nocturnal temperature-controlled laminar airflow (TLA), improves asthma-related quality of life and reduces airway inflammation, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in Thorax.

Robert J. Boyle, Ph.D., from Imperial College London, and colleagues examined whether using TLA treatment at night for environmental control improved the quality of life for patients with inadequately controlled persistent atopic asthma. Of the 312 participants (aged 7 to 70 years) enrolled in the study, TLA devices were successfully installed in the bedrooms of 282 participants. The main outcome measure was the proportion of participants showing an increase of 0.5 points or greater in the asthma quality of life score following one year of treatment.

The investigators identified a difference of 14.8 percent in the treatment response rate between the active and placebo groups (76 and 61 percent, respectively). The response rate for patients aged 12 years or older showed a similar difference of 14.1 percent, between the active and placebo groups (74 and 60 percent, respectively). The fractional exhaled nitric oxide change differed by −7.1 parts per billion between the groups. Compared to placebo, active treatment was associated with less increase in cat-specific immunoglobulin E. Adverse event rates did not differ between the groups.

"Inhalant exposure reduction with TLA improves quality of life, airway inflammation, and systemic allergy in patients with persistent atopic asthma," the authors write.

The study was funded by Airsonett AB, which manufactures the TLA device.

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Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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