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Viral Suppression Low in U.S. Adults With HIV

Last Updated: November 29, 2011.

 

Effort needed to increase numbers receiving proper care

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Although viral suppression is high in HIV-infected individuals who receive ongoing medical care and anti-retroviral treatment, researchers estimate only 28 percent of U.S. adults living with HIV have control over their infection, according to a report published in the Nov. 29 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

TUESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although viral suppression is high in HIV-infected individuals who receive ongoing medical care and anti-retroviral treatment (ART), researchers estimate only 28 percent of U.S. adults living with HIV have control over their infection, according to a report published in the Nov. 29 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Stacy M. Cohen, M.P.H., of the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues reviewed surveillance data to estimate the status of HIV testing in the United States; the prevalence of adults with HIV infection; and the percentage of HIV-infected adults who received ART, achieved viral suppression, and received prevention counseling from health care providers.

The researchers found that fewer than 10 percent of adults were tested for HIV in 2010. About half of the estimated 942,000 people with HIV were linked to ongoing care, and 45 percent received prevention counseling. Among the 89 percent prescribed ART, 77 percent achieved viral suppression.

"Prevalence of HIV testing and linkage to care are high but warrant continued effort. Increasing the percentages of HIV-infected persons who remain in HIV care, achieve viral suppression, and receive prevention counseling requires additional effort," the authors write.

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Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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