Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Endocrinology | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

November 2011 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

Last Updated: December 01, 2011.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Diabetes & Endocrinology for November 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Birth Weight Inversely Impacts Diabetes Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Birth weight is inversely associated with adult fasting-glucose levels and with the risk of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), according to a study published online Nov. 18 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Patients Highly Satisfied With Outpatient Medical Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients in the United States are, in general, highly satisfied with their outpatient medical care, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Health Outcomes Research in Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk Factors ID'd for Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Factors associated with an increased risk of radiation-induced hypothyroidism (RIHT) include female gender and surgery involving the thyroid gland or other neck surgery, with Caucasians at increased risk compared with African-Americans, according to a meta-analysis published in the Dec. 1 issue of Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pronounced Childhood Effects Seen With MC4R Deficiency

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of melanocortin-4-receptor (MC4R) deficiency on the body mass accumulation rate are more pronounced during childhood, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in Diabetes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nonfasting Tests Useful for Peds Dysglycemia Screening

TUESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A one-hour 50-gram nonfasting glucose challenge test (1-h GCT) and random blood glucose test are more reliable screening tools for dysglycemia (prediabetes or diabetes) in children than hemoglobin (Hb) A1c testing, according to a study published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Prediagnosis BMI Predicts Mortality in Patients With CRC

TUESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), prediagnosis, but not postdiagnosis, body mass index (BMI) is an important predictor of all-cause and cause-specific mortality; and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have a higher risk of mortality, according to two studies published online Nov. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract - Campbell
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Dehal
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

High-Performing Docs Learn Equally From Success, Failure

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among physicians making decisions in a medically-framed learning task, high and low performers show distinct behavioral and neural patterns of learning, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in PLoS One.

Full Text

Short Stature Tied to Low-Frequency, Rare Gene Deletions

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Short stature is associated with an increased global burden of copy-number variants (CNVs) as well as a greater average length of CNVs for lower-frequency and rare deletions, according to a report published online Nov. 23 in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

GIP Identified As Bifunctional Blood Glucose Stabilizer

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Infusion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) increases glucagon responses during hypoglycemia and euglycemia, with no effect on insulin secretion, and more than doubles the insulin secretion rate during hyperglycemia, with no effect on glucagon responses, according to a study published in the December issue of Diabetes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Everolimus Ups Survival in Carcinoid Syndrome

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids), everolimus plus octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR) improves progression-free survival versus placebo plus octreotide LAR, according to a study published online Nov. 25 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Processed Red Meat Tied to Incident Type 2 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The intake of processed, but not unprocessed red meat, is associated with incident type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Nov. 18 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drugs ID'd in Most Older Adult Emergency Hospitalizations

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Adverse drug events from commonly used medications, including warfarin, insulin, oral antiplatelet agents, and oral hypoglycemic agents, account for the majority of emergency hospitalizations in older adults in the United States, according to a study published in the Nov. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Improves Glycemic Control

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes not taking prandial insulin, 12 weeks of intermittent real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) significantly improves and sustains glycemic control compared with use of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), according to a study published online Nov. 18 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Oliguria in Bariatric Surgery Not Tied to Intra-Op Fluids

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery have low urine output, irrespective of the intraoperative fluid volume administered, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text

Adverse Effects of Pediatric Acupuncture Usually Mild

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of adverse effects (AEs) associated with pediatric acupuncture are mild in severity, according to a review published online Nov. 21 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nonpunitive Method Improves Medical Error Reporting

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Medical error reporting in an academic pediatric ambulatory practice can be improved by a voluntary, nonpunitive, error-reporting system, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

African-American Women Lose Less Weight in Trials

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- African-American women lose less weight than other subgroups through behavioral weight loss interventions, according to a review published online Nov. 10 in Obesity Reviews.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Largest Percentile Gain in BMI Seen in Elementary School

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The largest gains in body mass index (BMI) percentile are seen during elementary school, specifically between first and third grades, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Restrictive Policies Push Gene Influence on Smoking Behavior

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to dizygotic twins, monozygotic twins are more likely to quit smoking during a similar time frame, and the influence of genetic factors was more pronounced in 1975 to 1980 than in 1960 to 1974, coincident with the implententation of restrictive smoking legislation, according to a study published in the November issue of Demography.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obese Mice Retain Insulin Sensitivity in Ovary/Pituitary

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In female mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO), insulin sensitivity is maintained in the pituitary and ovary, according to an experimental study published online Nov. 10 in Diabetes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Growth Hormone Replacement Ups Diabetes Incidence

FRIDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy (GHRT) in adult patients with GH deficiency increases the risk of developing diabetes, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetes-Related Visual Impairment Declining in U.S.

THURSDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported visual impairment in adults with diabetes has declined significantly in the last 14 years, while annual contact with eye care providers remains unchanged, according to a report published in the Nov. 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Hyperglycemia, Mortality Linked in Pulmonary Embolism

THURSDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated glucose levels are common among patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE), and are independently associated with increased 30-day mortality, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Energy Deficits Induce Adverse Neuroendocrine Changes

THURSDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Energy deficits in animals and humans induce neuroendocrine changes that may adversely affect body composition, according to a review published online Nov. 10 in Obesity Reviews.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

AURKA, MYCN Overexpressed in Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- AURKA and MYCN are overexpressed in patients with neuroendocrine prostate cancers (NEPC) and cooperate to produce a neuroendocrine phenotype, according to a study published in the November issue of Cancer Discovery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obese to Nonobese BMI Change Lowers Cardiovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who are overweight or obese in childhood and nonobese as adults have a cardiovascular-risk profile similar to those who were never obese, according to a study published in the Nov. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Whole-Body Vibration Does Not Improve Bone Density

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Low magnitude whole-body vibration (WBV) does not affect bone mineral density (BMD) and structure in healthy postmenopausal women who receive calcium and vitamin D supplementation, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients Without Insurance Have Shorter Hospital Stays

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients without Medicaid or any other insurance, with ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) or non-ACSCs, have shorter lengths of stay in hospitals than patients with insurance, according to a study published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Researchers Develop Working Pituitary Gland in Mouse Model

MONDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A functional pituitary gland can be produced from mouse embryonic stem cells, opening the door to possible new therapies for diseases of the pituitary gland, according to an experimental study published online Nov. 9 in Nature.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Western Diet in Youth May Up Diabetes Risk in Middle-Age

FRIDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Eating like an American while in high school may set the stage for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) later in life, according to research published online Nov. 10 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Dairy/High Protein Ups Bone Health During Weight Loss

FRIDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of dairy foods and high protein over 16 weeks of diet- and exercise-induced weight loss improves markers of bone health and calcium metabolism in obese or overweight, premenopausal women, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Recurrent Pelvic Inflammation Ups Infertility, Pelvic Pain

FRIDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Recurrent pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is associated with a nearly two-fold increase in infertility and more than four-fold increase in chronic pelvic pain (CPP), according to a study published in the September issue of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diazoxide Lowers Glucose Production in Humans, Rats

FRIDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Oral administration of diazoxide, a hypothalamic ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel activator, decreases endogenous glucose production (EGP) in humans without diabetes and in rats, according to an experimental study published online Nov. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Full Text

Overactive Bladder Prevalent in Patients With Diabetes

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Overactive bladder (OAB) is prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes, with the prevalence higher in older patients and those with long-standing diabetes, according to a study published in the November issue of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Half of U.S. Adult Smokers Tried to Quit Last Year

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of adults who smoke would like to quit, but only about a third of them seek medical help and/or support to do so, according to research published in the Nov. 11 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Adipotide Reduces White Adipose Tissue in Obese Monkeys

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The ligand-directed peptidomimetic CKGGRAKDC-GG-D(KLAKLAK)2 (adipotide) reduces white adipose tissue in obese monkeys, according to an experimental study published in the Nov. 9 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Glove Use Linked to Reduced Hand Hygiene Compliance

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Glove usage among healthcare workers is often inappropriate, and hand hygiene compliance is worse when gloves are worn, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Evidence Shows Reduced Sodium Intake Lowers BP

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Reduced sodium intake is associated with a significant decrease in blood pressure (BP), and a concomitant increase in plasma levels of renin, aldosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline, cholesterol, and triglycerides, according to a review published online Nov. 9 in the American Journal of Hypertension.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Banning Sugar-Sweetened Drinks Cuts In-School Access

TUESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. state policies that ban all sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) reduce in-school SSB access and purchasing, but do not reduce their overall consumption, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Great Achievement at Young Age Function of Time, Not Field

MONDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The frequency of great scientific achievements at young age is a function of time, and not related to the field, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Impact of Exercise Lessened by Metformin in Prediabetes

MONDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- For men and women with prediabetes, insulin sensitivity increases to a similar extent with exercise training, metformin, or a combination of the two, with metformin impacting slightly on the effect of exercise, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exenatide Tied to Modest Weight Loss for Obese Women

MONDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- For obese women without diabetes, short-term treatment with exenetide is associated with modest weight loss and decreased waist circumference, with a subset of women benefiting from significant weight loss, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Exercise Lowers CVD Death Risk Irrespective of Metabolic Factors

MONDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity is associated with lower risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, independent of metabolic risk factors, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vigorous Exercise Moderates Diet-Induced Weight Gain

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Vigorous exercise, such as running, may reduce the risk of weight gain by high-risk diets, according to a study published in the November issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Receptionists Contribute to Safety of Repeat Prescriptions

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Receptionists and administrative staff of general practices in the United Kingdom make important contributions to quality and safety in repeat prescribing, which are often unknown to clinicians, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Adoption of English Diet Could Reduce U.K. Mortality

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Following a diet with nutritional quality equivalent to the English diet would substantially reduce mortality in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in BMJ Open.

Full Text

Rooms of Patients With A. baumannii Often Contaminated

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of rooms of patients colonized or infected with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) (MDR-AB) have surfaces which are positive for A. baumannii, even in patients with a remote history of infection, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Resveratrol Induces Metabolic Changes in Obese Humans

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Thirty-day resveratrol supplementation in obese, but otherwise healthy, humans exerts favorable metabolic adaptations, according to a study published in the Nov. 2 issue of Cell Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text

Risks for C. difficile Infection, Colonization Identified

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Health care-associated Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and colonization are differentially associated with defined host and pathogen variables, according to a study published in the Nov. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

No Medicare Savings From Disease-Management Hotline

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Commercial disease-management companies using nurse-based call centers modestly improve quality-of-care measures in Medicare fee-for-service programs with no evident reduction in costs of care or acute care utilization, according to a study published in the Nov. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rectal CA Radiotherapy Tied to Lower Testosterone Levels

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Men who are exposed to long-course radiotherapy for rectal cancer have significantly lower serum testosterone levels compared to pretreatment, according to a review published in the November issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Opioid Overdoses Have Reached Epidemic Proportions

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid pain relievers (OPR) are involved in most drug overdose deaths; and OPR-related deaths, sales, and treatment admissions have increased in the last decade, according to a report published in the Nov. 1 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Report

Childhood Diet Tied to Adult Glycemic, BP Control

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Following a low-fat and high-fiber diet in childhood and adolescence may improve long-term glycemic control and lower blood pressure in adult women, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Radiation Dose Predicts Growth Hormone Deficit

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- For children with brain tumors, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) can be predicted by the time after conformal radiation therapy (CRT) and the mean radiation dose to the hypothalamus, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Physical Activity Reduces Link Between FTO and Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The association of the FTO variant rs9939606 with obesity is attenuated in physically active compared to inactive adults, according to a meta-analysis published online Nov. 1 in PLoS Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Sex Steroid Levels Tied to Body Composition in Older Men

TUESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of testosterone are associated with reduced loss of appendicular lean mass in older men, especially those who are losing weight, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: November 2011 Briefing - Dermatology Next: November 2011 Briefing - Family Practice

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.