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Category: Rheumatology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2011 Briefing - Rheumatology

Last Updated: December 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Rheumatology for November 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Metal, Ceramics on Par With Traditional Hip Implants

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable hip devices with metal on metal or ceramic on ceramic bearings do not offer an advantage over those with traditional bearings, according to a review published online Nov. 29 in BMJ.

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U.S. Patients Highly Satisfied With Outpatient Medical Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients in the United States are, in general, highly satisfied with their outpatient medical care, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Health Outcomes Research in Medicine.

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High-Performing Docs Learn Equally From Success, Failure

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among physicians making decisions in a medically-framed learning task, high and low performers show distinct behavioral and neural patterns of learning, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in PLoS One.

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Autoimmune Disorders Tied to Pulmonary Embolism Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Autoimmune disorders are associated with an increased risk of pulmonary embolism, particularly during the first year after hospitalization, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in The Lancet.

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Behavioral Therapy Effective in Juvenile Fibromyalgia

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is superior to fibromyalgia education (FE) for reducing functional disability in adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM), according to a study published online Nov. 22 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Adverse Effects of Pediatric Acupuncture Usually Mild

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of adverse effects (AEs) associated with pediatric acupuncture are mild in severity, according to a review published online Nov. 21 in Pediatrics.

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Survival Up With Posterior Cruciate-Retaining TKR

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Posterior cruciate-retaining total knee replacements (TKRs) show better survival at 15 years than posterior cruciate-stabilizing TKRs, according to a study published in the Nov. 16 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Nonpunitive Method Improves Medical Error Reporting

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Medical error reporting in an academic pediatric ambulatory practice can be improved by a voluntary, nonpunitive, error-reporting system, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in Pediatrics.

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Pain, Function Key Factors in Elective Amputation Decision

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with a functionally impaired lower limb, the decision to opt for elective amputation is largely influenced by the severity of pain and desire for improved function, according to a study published in the Nov. 16 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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CT Scan Beats Radiograph for Diagnosing Sacroiliitis

FRIDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected spondyloarthritis (SpA), sacroiliitis is underestimated by radiography compared with computerized tomography (CT) scans, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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'Number of Criteria' Approach Best Defines Gout Flare

FRIDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Gout flare is best defined using a "number of criteria" approach that includes the presence of four patient-reported features associated with flare, according to a study published online Nov. 14 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Sleep Problem Severity Tied to Fibromyalgia Risk in Women

THURSDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The severity of self-reported sleep problems in women has a significant dose-response association with their risk of developing fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome, with the association stronger among older and middle-aged women, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Mycophenolate Mofetil Beats Azathioprine in Lupus Nephritis

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with lupus nephritis who have a clinical response to induction therapy, mycophenolate mofetil is superior to azathioprine for maintaining a renal response to treatment and preventing relapse, according to a study published in the Nov. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Whole-Body Vibration Does Not Improve Bone Density

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Low magnitude whole-body vibration (WBV) does not affect bone mineral density (BMD) and structure in healthy postmenopausal women who receive calcium and vitamin D supplementation, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Patients Without Insurance Have Shorter Hospital Stays

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients without Medicaid or any other insurance, with ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) or non-ACSCs, have shorter lengths of stay in hospitals than patients with insurance, according to a study published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Half of U.S. Adult Smokers Tried to Quit Last Year

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of adults who smoke would like to quit, but only about a third of them seek medical help and/or support to do so, according to research published in the Nov. 11 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Glove Use Linked to Reduced Hand Hygiene Compliance

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Glove usage among healthcare workers is often inappropriate, and hand hygiene compliance is worse when gloves are worn, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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TNF-α Antagonists Do Not Up Infection Hospitalizations

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with autoimmune diseases, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonist use is not associated with a significant increase in serious infections requiring hospitalization, compared to nonbiologic medication use, according to a study published online Nov. 6 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Varying Response to Etanercept in Juvenile Arthritis

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the treatment response to etanercept varies, with excellent response associated with lower baseline disability scores, fewer pretreatment disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and younger age of onset, according to a study published online Nov. 6 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Centrally-Mediated Symptoms Tied to Pain Severity in OA

TUESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- For women with osteoarthritis, age, radiographic severity, and centrally-mediated symptoms account for a considerable proportion of the variance of pain severity, according to a study published in the November issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Great Achievement at Young Age Function of Time, Not Field

MONDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The frequency of great scientific achievements at young age is a function of time, and not related to the field, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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FDA Enhancing Surveillance for Anti-TNF Malignancy

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is stepping up their safety surveillance of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, such as infliximab and adalimumab, amidst ongoing reports of hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma in children and young adults, according to a safety alert issued Nov. 4 by the agency.

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Receptionists Contribute to Safety of Repeat Prescriptions

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Receptionists and administrative staff of general practices in the United Kingdom make important contributions to quality and safety in repeat prescribing, which are often unknown to clinicians, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in BMJ.

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Immune Response, Antibody Titers Seen Prior to Clinical RA

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) spreading starts several years prior to the onset of clinical rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with a marked increase in ACPA titers seen approximately two to four years before RA diagnosis, according to a study published in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Rooms of Patients With A. baumannii Often Contaminated

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of rooms of patients colonized or infected with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) (MDR-AB) have surfaces which are positive for A. baumannii, even in patients with a remote history of infection, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Carisoprodol-Related Emergency Visits Up in United States

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Carisoprodol misuse- or abuse-related emergency department visits increased in the United States between 2004 and 2009, with the majority of visits involving other pharmaceuticals, according to a report published online Nov. 3 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Risks for C. difficile Infection, Colonization Identified

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Health care-associated Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and colonization are differentially associated with defined host and pathogen variables, according to a study published in the Nov. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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No Medicare Savings From Disease-Management Hotline

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Commercial disease-management companies using nurse-based call centers modestly improve quality-of-care measures in Medicare fee-for-service programs with no evident reduction in costs of care or acute care utilization, according to a study published in the Nov. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CDC: Opioid Overdoses Have Reached Epidemic Proportions

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid pain relievers (OPR) are involved in most drug overdose deaths; and OPR-related deaths, sales, and treatment admissions have increased in the last decade, according to a report published in the Nov. 1 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Yoga Beats Usual Care for Pain-Related Back Function

TUESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic or recurrent low back pain, attending yoga classes is associated with better back function than usual care, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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