Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Critical Care | Emergency Medicine | Nursing | Orthopedics | ENT | Surgery | Anesthesiology & Pain | Urology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Time of Operation Not Linked to Postoperative Mortality

Last Updated: December 02, 2011.

 

Time of day, day of week, month of surgery, moon phase do not affect 30-day post-op mortality

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The timing of general surgery and the moon phase are not associated with 30-day mortality after surgery, according to a study published in the December issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

FRIDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The timing of general surgery and the moon phase are not associated with 30-day mortality after surgery, according to a study published in the December issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Daniel I. Sessler, M.D., from the Cleveland Clinic, and colleagues investigated whether the timing of general surgery (time of day, day of the week, July/August versus other months) and moon phase were independently related to 30-day mortality, or to a composite of in-hospital complications. A total of 32,001 patients who underwent elective general surgery between January 2005 to September 2010 were analyzed for binary outcomes according to the hour of the day (6 a.m. to 7 p.m.), day of the workweek, month of the year, and moon phase in which the surgery was started. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate 30-day mortality as a binary end point, after adjusting for the risk stratification index.

The investigators found that a four hour relative increase in the time of day was associated with an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 1.23 (P = 0.09) for 30-day mortality. Similarly, the day of week was not associated with 30-day mortality (aOR, 0.99 for a relative increase of one day; P = 0.85). Compared to other months, mortality was no more frequent in the months of July and August (aOR, 0.72; P = 0.22). There was no significant association between the moon phase and mortality (P = 0.72). Time-dependent differences in composite complications were nonsignificant.

"Elective general surgery appears to be comparably safe at any time of the workday, any day of the workweek, and in any month of the year," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Eating Out of Home Linked to Higher Calorie and Fat Intake Next: Biomarkers of Huntington's Disease Progression ID'd

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.