Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Nursing | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

New Equation Accurately Predicts Body Fat Percentage

Last Updated: January 18, 2012.

 

Equation correlates with cardiometabolic risk factors better than BMI or waist circumference

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The Clinica Universidad de Navarra body adiposity estimator is an effective clinical tool for the prediction of body fat percentage, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in Diabetes Care.

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The Clinica Universidad de Navarra body adiposity estimator (CUN-BAE) is an effective clinical tool for the prediction of body fat percentage (BF%), according to a study published online Dec. 16 in Diabetes Care.

Javier Gómez-Ambrosi, Ph.D., of the CUN in Pamplona, Spain, and colleagues compared the clinical usefulness of the CUN-BAE with other methods of measuring BF% in a cohort of 6,510 predominantly female white participants, aged 18 to 80 years, with a wide range of adiposity. The equation was validated in a separate cohort of 1,149 participants, and the clinical value of its association with cardiometabolic risk factors was assessed in 634 participants.

In the overall patient cohort, the researchers found that the mean BF% based on CUN-BAE prediction was 39.3 percent, compared with 39.9 percent based on air displacement plethysmography. The highest correlation with actual BF% was seen with the BF% calculated using the CUN-BAE (r = 0.89), compared with other anthropometric measures or estimators of BF%. A similar correlation was seen in the validation cohort. In the subset of 634 participants, BF% predicted by CUN-BAE had a better correlation with cardiometabolic risk factors than body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference.

"Because the possibility of measuring BF% is not always available and the relation between BMI and BF% is highly dependent on sex and age, we have developed and validated an easy-to-apply predictive equation that may be used as a first screening tool in medical practice," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Cybercycling Improves Cognitive Function in Elderly Next: Meningitis B Vaccine Immunogenic in Adolescents

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.