Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Nursing | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Cognitive Impairment Seen in Overweight Retired NFL Players

Last Updated: January 19, 2012.

 

Overweight retired football players have decreased blood flow in certain areas of the brain

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Overweight retired National Football League players have decreased blood flow in certain areas of the brain as well as significant decreases in attention, cognitive proficiency, and memory, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Translational Psychiatry.

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight retired National Football League (NFL) players have decreased blood flow in certain areas of the brain as well as significant decreases in attention, cognitive proficiency, and memory, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Translational Psychiatry.

Kristen C. Willeumier, M.D., of Amen Clinics in Newport Beach, Calif., and colleagues investigated the effects of body mass (measured by waist-to-height ratio) on regional cerebral blood flow in retired NFL players. Differences in blood flow were measured by computed tomography imaging and compared for 38 normal weight and 38 overweight athletes (mean age, 58 years).

The researchers found that a higher waist-to-height ratio was associated with decreased blood flow in the prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 8, 9, and 10) and deficits in the temporal pole. Overweight athletes had significant reductions in attention, memory, and general cognitive proficiency.

"Our cohort of overweight NFL players [demonstrates] decreased performance in the areas of attention and cognitive functioning upon neuropsychological evaluation," the authors write. "If this finding is replicated it indicates that proper weight education and management may be essential to the future health of athletes who have been exposed to repetitive brain trauma."

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: ASCO: Regorafenib Improves Survival in Metastatic CRC Next: SAMHSA: One in Five U.S. Adults Has Mental Illness

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.