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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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January 2012 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: February 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for January 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Fenofibrate Found Safe in Diabetes With Renal Impairment

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term daily use of fenofibrate is beneficial for patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment and is not associated with an increase in drug-related safety concerns compared with those with mild renal impairment, according to research published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Fructose Linked to Increased Cardiometabolic Risk in Teens

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In adolescents, consumption of fructose is associated with multiple markers of cardiometabolic risk, and this association seems to be mediated by visceral adipose tissue (VAT), according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

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Physician Overweight/Obesity Impacts Obesity Care

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Being overweight/obese has a significant impact on a physician's provision of obesity care, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in Obesity.

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Meta-Analysis: Statin Therapy Equally Effective in Women, Men

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Statin therapy is equally effective for decreasing cardiovascular events in women and men, according to a meta-analysis published in the Feb. 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Differing Arm Blood Pressure Linked to Vascular Disease, Death

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Systolic blood pressure that differs by more than 10 or 15 mm Hg between arms is associated with a higher risk of vascular problems and death, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in The Lancet.

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Self-Rated Health Status Predicts Mortality Among CVD Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Self-rated health status is a risk factor for future vascular events and mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases, particularly in those with asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Warfarin Use Lowers Mortality in Septuagenarians With A-Fib

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In a group of septuagenarian patients with atrial fibrillation, followed for up to six years, warfarin use is associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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ACE Inhibitors Not Linked to Improved Outcomes After ACS

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), prior chronic use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor is not independently associated with improved in-hospital outcomes, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Deaths From Myocardial Infarction Halved in England

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- From 2002 to 2010 in England, there was a decrease of about half in the total mortality rate for acute myocardial infarction, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in BMJ.

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Exposure to Iodinated Contrast Media Affects Thyroid Function

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to iodinated contrast media (ICM), which are frequently used during imaging procedures, is associated with changes in thyroid function, specifically an increased risk of developing incident hyperthyroidism and incident overt hypothyroidism, according to a study published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Positive Affirmation Improves Medication Adherence

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patient education (PE) enhanced with positive affirmation (PA) improves medication adherence over education alone in African-Americans with hypertension, but it does not lead to significant improvements in blood pressure (BP) reduction, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Risk-Factor Burden Impacts Lifetime Risk of Cardio Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Variation in risk-factor burden results in considerable differences in the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease, and these differences are consistent across race and birth cohorts, according to a meta-analysis published in the Jan. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Overuse of Health Care Services Understudied

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Overuse of health care services in the United States is an understudied problem, with the majority of research limited to a few interventions, according to a review published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Sex Differences Exist in Disease-Linked Pain Intensity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Sex differences exist in specific disease-associated pain intensity, with women suffering a higher prevalence of pain for musculoskeletal, neuropathic, abdominal, and migraine-related conditions, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in The Journal of Pain.

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Foods Fried in Olive Oil Not Linked to Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Eating foods fried in olive or sunflower oil is not linked to heart disease or all-cause mortality, according to a Spanish study published online Jan. 24 in BMJ.

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Unemployed Have Poorer Mental and Physical Health

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Unemployed adults are about half as likely to have health insurance as employed individuals; have poorer mental and physical health, regardless of their insurance status; and are less likely to receive needed medical care and prescriptions, according to a January data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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HealthGrades IDs Notable Hospitals for Clinical Excellence

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The top 5 percent of U.S. hospitals has more than a 30 percent lower risk-adjusted mortality across 17 procedures and diagnoses, compared with other hospitals, according to the 10th annual HealthGrades Hospital Quality and Clinical Excellence study published online Jan. 24.

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Parental Role in Successful Child Weight Loss Unclear

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Parents should be involved in weight loss treatment programs for their obese children, but more research is needed to identify specific approaches that enable parents and adult caregivers (PACs) to be more effective agents in assisting obese children with weight loss, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published online Jan. 23 in Circulation.

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Unhealthy Narcissism Linked to Elevated Cortisol in Men

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Narcissism is associated with elevated levels of cortisol in men, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in PLoS One.

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Sleep Disturbance Linked to Cardiometabolic Disease Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep duration and sleep disturbance are associated with cardiometabolic disease, according to a study published online Dec. 12 in the Journal of Sleep Research.

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Sexual Activity Safe for Most Cardiovascular Disease Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For most individuals with stable cardiovascular disease (CVD), sexual activity is safe, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association published online Jan. 19 in Circulation.

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Worse Outcomes for Stroke Patients With Delirium

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke patients who develop delirium have worse outcomes, including higher mortality and longer hospitalizations, and are more likely to be discharged to a care facility, according to a review published online Jan. 19 in Stroke.

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Upper Normal BP Increases Risk for A-Fib in Men

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Having blood pressure (BP) within the upper limits of normal can predict future atrial fibrillation (AF) in otherwise healthy, middle-aged men, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Hypertension.

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Prevalence of Obesity Unchanged in Adults/Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity in adults and children/adolescents in the United States has remained unchanged in recent years, according to two studies published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Platelet Inhibition Maintained With Pre-CABG Cangrelor

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who discontinue thienopyridine treatment before coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, the use of cangrelor as a bridge is associated with higher maintenance of platelet inhibition compared with placebo, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low Doses of Insulin Induce an Elastogenic Effect

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin induces an elastogenic effect, with therapeutic doses of insulin stimulating the formation of elastic fibers in human aortic smooth muscle cell cultures, according to an experimental study published online Jan. 11 in The American Journal of Pathology.

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Endovascular Graft Approved for Tears of Aorta

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded approval of an endovascular graft to include ruptures of the aorta.

tears of the aorta

Access to Quality Primary Care Reduces Mortality Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Greater access to high-quality primary medical care that includes features of comprehensiveness, patient-centeredness, and extended office hours is associated with a reduced risk of death, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Practice Differs for Cardiac Screening in ADHD Treatment

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable variation in the attitudes, barriers, and practices of pediatricians for cardiac screening before initiation of stimulant treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Jan 16 in Pediatrics.

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U.S. Health Care Expenditure Still Unevenly Distributed

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Health care expenditure in the United States is still unevenly distributed, with 1 percent of the population accounting for approximately 20 percent of expenditure in 2008 and 2009, according to a January statistical brief published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Dark Chocolate Inhibits Platelet Function in Smokers

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In smokers, dark chocolate lowers oxidative stress and has an inhibitory effect on platelet function, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Low Risk of Cardiac Arrest in Marathon Runners

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- While the overall risk of cardiac arrest during a marathon or half-marathon is low, the risk is higher for those participating in marathons than half-marathons and for men than women, particularly for men with underlying hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or atherosclerotic coronary disease, according to a study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physical Activity in Work or Leisure Tied to Lower MI Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity during work or leisure time is associated with a significantly lower risk of myocardial infarction (MI), according to a multinational study published online Jan. 11 in the European Heart Journal.

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Subclinical Tachyarrhythmias Tied to Increased Risk of Stroke

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Subclinical atrial tachyarrhythmias, which occur in approximately 10 percent of patients in the first three months after pacemaker or defibrillator implantation, are associated with an increased risk of clinical atrial fibrillation, stroke, and systemic embolism, according to a study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CDC: 2010 Saw Decrease in Age-Adjusted Death Rates

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- From 2009 to 2010, age-adjusted death rates decreased and life expectancy increased, according to a Jan. 11 report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Complications Increase With Delay of BP Control in Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- For middle-aged patients with newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes, the impact of a delay in controlling systolic blood pressure depends on the length of the delay, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Asian-American Heart Attack Care Now Similar to Whites

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Recently, the quality of care following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has improved for Asian-American and white patients, and the differences in care between Asian and white patients have also been reduced, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Hypertension Registry IDs Features of Pediatric HTN

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of data from the Tracking Outcomes and Practice in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension (TOPP) registry has identified clinical features specific to the care of children with pulmonary hypertension, according to research published online Jan. 11 in The Lancet.

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Dementia Associated With More Hospital Admissions

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital admission rates for all causes, and for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs), are significantly higher among patients with dementia compared to older patients without dementia, according to a study published in the Jan. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Too High, Too Low Serum Potassium Linked to Mortality

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients hospitalized after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with post-admission serum potassium levels between 3.5 and 4.5 mEq/L (milliEquivalents per liter) have a lower risk of death than those with higher or lower levels, according to a study published in the Jan. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Benefit of Aspirin in Primary Prevention Questioned

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals without prior cardiovascular disease (CVD), aspirin prophylaxis does not reduce cardiovascular death or cancer mortality, although it is associated with reductions in nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), according to a meta-analysis published online Jan. 9 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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A Broken Heart Does Increase Heart Attack Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The death of a significant person in someone's life is associated with a significantly increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI) for the grieving individual in the days following the death, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Circulation.

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Long-Term Prognostic Value of Dobutamine Stress Echo Limited

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) has limited long-term predictive value for patients with diabetes who are unable to perform an exercise stress test, particularly during the first seven years after initial testing, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Diabetes Care.

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Ped Heart Surgery Deaths Higher at Low Volume Centers

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Postoperative mortality rates from complications after pediatric heart surgery are higher at centers with a lower volume of cases, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Glucose-Lowering Algorithm Safe in Coronary Care Unit

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In coronary care unit (CCU) patients, a paper-based glucose-lowering algorithm with target serum glucose levels of 5.0 to 6.5 mmol/L (90 to 117 mg/dL) can be safely implemented, but further studies are needed to assess cardiovascular outcomes, according to research published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Exercise Benefits Insulin-Treated Obese Patients With Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Supervised mixed (aerobic and resistance) exercise is effective in improving hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk related to insulin treatment in overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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In-Hospital, 30-Day Standardized Mortality Measures Differ

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The mean risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs) differ for in-hospital and 30-day models, with wide variability across U.S. hospitals, according to a study published in the Jan. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Most Type 2 Diabetes, CAD Patients Present With Angina

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A large proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and documented stable coronary artery disease have symptoms of angina, and the nature of symptom presentation may be associated with the type of previous revascularization, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Multiple Blockages, U.S. Heart Attack Care Ups Readmissions

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patients treated for heart attacks in the United States have shorter initial hospital stays but significantly higher rates of 30-day readmission compared with patients in other countries, according to a study published in the Jan. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Bariatric Surgery Tied to Reduced CVD Events, Mortality

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- For obese individuals, bariatric surgery is associated with significantly reduced incidence of cardiovascular events, and decreased cardiovascular death, versus usual care, according to a study published in the Jan. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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