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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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January 2012 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: February 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for January 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Breast Reexcision Rates Vary With Surgeon, Institution

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For women with invasive breast cancer who undergo partial mastectomy and have negative margins, reexcision rates vary substantially depending on the surgeon and institution, according to a retrospective chart review published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Safety-Net Status Not Linked to ER Length of Stay

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- There is no significant difference in compliance with emergency department length-of-stay measures for admissions, discharges, observations, and transfers between safety-net and non-safety-net hospitals, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Fenofibrate Found Safe in Diabetes With Renal Impairment

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term daily use of fenofibrate is beneficial for patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment and is not associated with an increase in drug-related safety concerns compared with those with mild renal impairment, according to research published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Diabetes Drugs Affect Pancreatic Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of the diabetes drug metformin is associated with a lower risk of pancreatic cancer only in women, while long-term use of sulfonylureas and insulin are associated with a significantly higher risk of pancreatic cancer, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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Cyberknife Effective in Treating Trigeminal Neuralgia

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Cyberknife stereotactic radiosurgery is effective in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), according to a small study published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

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Fructose Linked to Increased Cardiometabolic Risk in Teens

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In adolescents, consumption of fructose is associated with multiple markers of cardiometabolic risk, and this association seems to be mediated by visceral adipose tissue (VAT), according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

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Early Maternal Support Ups Hippocampal Volume in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal support during the preschool years has a positive effect on healthy hippocampal development, which is key to memory and stress modulation, according to an article published online Jan. 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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High-Fiber Diet May Not Lower Risk of Diverticulosis

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- High dietary fiber intake was not associated with a lower prevalence of diverticulosis. In fact, people who ate a high-fiber diet and those having 15 or more bowel movements per week had a higher, not lower, prevalence of diverticulosis, according to research published in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

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Sixty Percent Burn Size Crucial Threshold in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Children with burns covering 60 percent of their body or more are at much higher risk for complications and death and should receive specialized care, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in The Lancet.

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Physician Overweight/Obesity Impacts Obesity Care

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Being overweight/obese has a significant impact on a physician's provision of obesity care, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in Obesity.

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Warm Saline Enhances Shoulder Tendinitis Treatment

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a warm saline solution improves outcomes and reduces procedure time for patients undergoing double-needle ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous treatment for rotator cuff calcific tendinitis (RCCT), according to a study published in the February issue of Radiology.

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Erivedge Approved to Treat Basal Cell Carinoma

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Erivedge (vismodegib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat the most common form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, the agency said Monday.

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Booster Seat Use Inconsistent When Carpooling

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Booster seat use among children aged 4 to 8 years is inconsistent during carpooling, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Meta-Analysis: Statin Therapy Equally Effective in Women, Men

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Statin therapy is equally effective for decreasing cardiovascular events in women and men, according to a meta-analysis published in the Feb. 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Antiretroviral Medications Linked to Cleft Deformities

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) --Antiretroviral drugs prescribed for HIV-infected pregnant women to reduce risk of mother-to-child disease transmission may be linked to cleft lip and palate disorders in newborns, according to a study published in the January issue of Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal.

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Differing Arm Blood Pressure Linked to Vascular Disease, Death

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Systolic blood pressure that differs by more than 10 or 15 mm Hg between arms is associated with a higher risk of vascular problems and death, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in The Lancet.

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Eye Contact Abnormal in Infants at Risk for Autism

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Infants at risk for developing autism spectrum disorders already show abnormalities in their patterns of eye contact in their first year, which may allow earlier intervention, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Current Biology.

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Disc Degeneration More Likely in Overweight, Obese Adults

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obese adults are significantly more likely to have lumbar disc degeneration compared with those who have a normal body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Preventive Health Services Missed in Half of Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- During periodic health examinations (PHEs), a variety of patient, physician, and visit factors together affect the recommendation and delivery of evidence-based preventive health services, with patients receiving only about half of those services for which they are due, according to research published in the February issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Education Reduces Distress During Breast Cancer Treatment

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Interventions such as telephone counseling can help women with early-stage breast cancer adjust to emotional distress stemming from the side effects of treatment, according to a study published in the February issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Fever, Epidural Combo Ups Adverse Neonatal Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- For women who receive epidural analgesia, an elevation in the maternal intrapartum temperature is associated with an increased risk of adverse neonatal events, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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A Child's Family Should Be Integral to Health Care Team

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians should ensure that collaborative relationships with patients and families are incorporated into all aspects of their professional practice, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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More Research Needed on Weaning of Addicted Infants

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- More research is necessary to identify the optimal treatment strategy for weaning infants with neonatal drug withdrawal, but updates for clinical identification and monitoring of opioid-exposed infants have been presented in a guidance statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Family Teamwork Gives Valued Boost to Senior Care

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Family companions involved in physician visits with older adults usually offer task assistance in activities of daily living (ADLs) and can help build patient-provider partnerships to efficiently manage senior health, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Bydureon Approved for Type 2 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Bydureon (exenatide extended release), Amylin Pharmaceuticals' long-acting version of the diabetes drug Byetta, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Prenatal Testosterone Levels a Risk Factor for Language Delay

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- High prenatal testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of clinically significant language delay in the first three years of life for male children, but are associated with a reduced risk of language delay for female children, according to research published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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Self-Rated Health Status Predicts Mortality Among CVD Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Self-rated health status is a risk factor for future vascular events and mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases, particularly in those with asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Many Obesity Interventions Cost-Effective in Long-Term

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of obesity prevention interventions are cost-effective in the long-term, with the most favorable interventions being those which modify a target population's environment, according to a review published online Jan. 17 in Obesity Reviews.

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COPD Assessment Test Predicts Exacerbation Severity

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The COPD Assessment Test (CAT) provides a reliable score of exacerbation severity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Steroid-Sparing Renal Transplant Yields Successful Outcomes

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Rapid discontinuation of prednisone (RDP) five days after renal transplantation from a living (LD) or deceased donor (DD) yields acceptable 10-year patient and graft outcomes, according to research published online Jan. 26 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Better Dysglycemia Screening With Fasting Triglyceride Levels

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of fasting triglyceride levels to current American Diabetes Association (ADA) screening models improves the diagnostic accuracy of dysglycemia in overweight or obese children, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Diabetes Care.

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Polypectomy Outcomes Similar to Surgical Resection

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with malignant colonic polyps who have similar clinical characteristics, management with either polypectomy or surgical resection results in comparable outcomes, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Comparable Clinical Activity for Low-, High-Dose Clofarabine

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Low and high doses of clofarabine have comparable clinical activity for the treatment of patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Testing Patterns to Diagnose Neuropathy Vary Widely

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy undergo a median of four tests, with variability seen in testing patterns, according to a study published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Warfarin Use Lowers Mortality in Septuagenarians With A-Fib

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In a group of septuagenarian patients with atrial fibrillation, followed for up to six years, warfarin use is associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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New PCR-Based Assay Better Predicts Lung Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A new quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay can better identify which patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are at higher risk of mortality after surgical resection, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in The Lancet.

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More Than 40 Percent of Adults With RA Are Inactive

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- More than 40 percent of adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are inactive, with lack of both strong motivation and belief in physical activity accounting for most of the excess inactivity, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Decline in Rate of Diabetic Lower-Extremity Amputation

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- From 1996 to 2008 there was a decline in the rates of hospitalization for nontraumatic lower-extremity amputation (NLEA) in the U.S. population with diabetes, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Thirteen New Loci Linked to Age of Menopause Onset

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Thirteen new genetic loci have been linked to age of menopause onset, implicating genes involved in DNA repair and immune function, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Nature Genetics.

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ACE Inhibitors Not Linked to Improved Outcomes After ACS

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), prior chronic use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor is not independently associated with improved in-hospital outcomes, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Not Enough Americans Being Screened for Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. residents are not being screened for cancer at the recommended levels, and screening rates vary by several demographic factors, according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Exposure to Iodinated Contrast Media Affects Thyroid Function

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to iodinated contrast media (ICM), which are frequently used during imaging procedures, is associated with changes in thyroid function, specifically an increased risk of developing incident hyperthyroidism and incident overt hypothyroidism, according to a study published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Positive Affirmation Improves Medication Adherence

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patient education (PE) enhanced with positive affirmation (PA) improves medication adherence over education alone in African-Americans with hypertension, but it does not lead to significant improvements in blood pressure (BP) reduction, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Survival Reduced for Patients With Cancer Who Have Diabetes

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with cancer generally have reduced survival if they also have type 2 diabetes, although this depends on the type of cancer and diabetes treatment, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Anaphylactic Shock After Immunizations Is Rare

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Anaphylactic shock following immunization is extremely rare in children, and in the few reported cases, some children have a delayed onset of symptoms, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Oral HPV Infection Prevalence in U.S. Close to 7 Percent

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, the prevalence of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is 6.9 percent, with higher prevalence in men than women, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Deaths From Myocardial Infarction Halved in England

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- From 2002 to 2010 in England, there was a decrease of about half in the total mortality rate for acute myocardial infarction, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in BMJ.

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Long Working Hours Linked to Increased Risk of Depression

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Working 11 or more hours a day is associated with a significant increase in the likelihood of a major depressive episode (MDE) among British civil servants, compared with working a seven to eight hour day, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in PLoS One.

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Low Birth Weight May Be Risk Factor for Autism

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Low birth weight may be among potential environmental risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study of same-sex twins published online Dec. 2 in Psychological Medicine.

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Radiation Benefits Mixed After Breast-Preserving Surgery

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with radiation therapy after excision of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in women age 60 is associated with a slight improvement in survival, but may increase the likelihood of eventual mastectomy, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Risk-Factor Burden Impacts Lifetime Risk of Cardio Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Variation in risk-factor burden results in considerable differences in the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease, and these differences are consistent across race and birth cohorts, according to a meta-analysis published in the Jan. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Sildenafil Shows Potential for Lymphatic Malformations

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with sildenafil results in regression of lymphatic malformations in children, according to three cases presented in a letter published in the Jan. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Neurologists Should Routinely Assess Patients for Abuse

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Neurologists should evaluate patients for abuse and neglect, according to a position statement issued by the American Academy of Neurology published online Jan. 25 in Neurology.

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Men at Higher Risk for Mild Cognitive Impairment

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of both amnestic and nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and naMCI) is higher in men than women, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Neurology.

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Enriched Milk Powder Linked to Reduction in Gout Flare-Ups

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with gout, consumption of an enriched skim milk powder (SMP) is associated with a reduced number of flare-ups, compared with plain skim milk powder or lactose, according to a proof-of-concept study published online Jan. 23 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Overuse of Health Care Services Understudied

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Overuse of health care services in the United States is an understudied problem, with the majority of research limited to a few interventions, according to a review published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Foods Fried in Olive Oil Not Linked to Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Eating foods fried in olive or sunflower oil is not linked to heart disease or all-cause mortality, according to a Spanish study published online Jan. 24 in BMJ.

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Reduced Brain Activity Seen in Prereaders With Dyslexia Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Prereading children with a family history of developmental dyslexia (DD) show reduced activity in the bilateral occipitotemporal and left temporoparietal brain regions during phonological processing exercises, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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More Adverse QOL Issues in Young Breast Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women with breast cancer experience a decrease in their health-related quality of life (QOL), including increased psychological distress and fertility-related concerns, according to a review published Jan. 23 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Sex Differences Exist in Disease-Linked Pain Intensity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Sex differences exist in specific disease-associated pain intensity, with women suffering a higher prevalence of pain for musculoskeletal, neuropathic, abdominal, and migraine-related conditions, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in The Journal of Pain.

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Imaging May Spare Nerves in Prostate Cancer Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The use of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can help guide surgical decisions that may spare nerves in men with prostate cancer undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Radiology.

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BRCA Carriers Have Improved Survival in Ovarian Cancer

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are associated with improved five-year survival, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Unemployed Have Poorer Mental and Physical Health

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Unemployed adults are about half as likely to have health insurance as employed individuals; have poorer mental and physical health, regardless of their insurance status; and are less likely to receive needed medical care and prescriptions, according to a January data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Lansoprazole Does Not Improve Asthma Control in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For children with asthma without overt gastroesophageal reflux (GER), treatment with the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole is not associated with improved asthma control, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Perfluorinated Compounds Reduce Immunity in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Increased exposure to perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) is associated with reduced immune response to childhood vaccinations, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Reduced [11C]PiB Uptake in Cognitively Active Elderly

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly individuals who keep their brains active through activities such as reading, writing, and playing games have reduced uptake of carbon 11-labeled Pittsburg Compound B ([11C]PiB), according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Parental Role in Successful Child Weight Loss Unclear

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Parents should be involved in weight loss treatment programs for their obese children, but more research is needed to identify specific approaches that enable parents and adult caregivers (PACs) to be more effective agents in assisting obese children with weight loss, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published online Jan. 23 in Circulation.

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Dutasteride Delays Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Progression

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For men with low-risk prostate cancer who undergo active surveillance, treatment with dutasteride delays the time to cancer progression, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in The Lancet.

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HealthGrades IDs Notable Hospitals for Clinical Excellence

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The top 5 percent of U.S. hospitals has more than a 30 percent lower risk-adjusted mortality across 17 procedures and diagnoses, compared with other hospitals, according to the 10th annual HealthGrades Hospital Quality and Clinical Excellence study published online Jan. 24.

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Negative Social Interactions Linked to Inflammation

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Everyday social interactions that are negative or competitive are associated with elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Recent Shift in Indication for Total Elbow Arthroplasty

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The most common indication for total elbow arthroplasty in New York State changed from inflammatory conditions in 1997 to trauma in 2006, with revision and complication rates remaining high, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Fetal Growth Not Linked to Childhood Asthma

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Fetal growth restriction or acceleration is not associated with asthma symptoms in childhood, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Unhealthy Narcissism Linked to Elevated Cortisol in Men

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Narcissism is associated with elevated levels of cortisol in men, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in PLoS One.

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National Adolescent Hep A Vaccine Coverage Is Low

TUESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatitis A vaccine (HepA) coverage is low among adolescents nationally, but rates are higher among states with a vaccination requirement, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Statins May Reduce Risk for HCC in Hep B-Infected Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients, statin use is associated with a reduction in the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in a dose-dependent manner, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Sleep Disturbance Linked to Cardiometabolic Disease Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep duration and sleep disturbance are associated with cardiometabolic disease, according to a study published online Dec. 12 in the Journal of Sleep Research.

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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in ~4 Percent of U.K. Troops

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has a prevalence of 4.4 percent in U.K. troops returning from Iraq or Afghanistan, and 9.5 percent in those with a combat role, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation.

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Effects of Severe, Childhood Brain Injury Long Lasting

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- There is a high risk of persisting deficits following severe, childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Substantial Minority Continue Smoking After Cancer Diagnosis

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable minority of patients with lung and colorectal cancer continue smoking after being diagnosed, according to study published online Jan. 23 in Cancer.

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Many Tweens Don't Follow Correct Sun Behaviors

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- At least half of 10 year olds report experiencing sunburn in the past year and, as they hit their teen years, they report spending more unprotected time in the sun to get a tan, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Co-Occurring Conditions Impact Change in Autism Disorders

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the presence of co-occurring neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions is associated with a change in ASD diagnosis, and these conditions vary with the age of the child, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Dosing Errors Occur With IV Acetaminophen in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a new intravenous formulation of acetaminophen is associated with dosing errors in neonates, infants, and small children, and evaluation and management of these dosing errors are similar to oral overdose, according to a report published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Gender, Family, Ambivalence Impact Live Liver Donation

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Gender, relationship to the recipient, and ambivalence toward donation all impact living liver donor's decisions, motives, and post-donation outcomes, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Inadequate Hep B Vaccinations for High-Risk Adults

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately half of all adults at high risk of hepatitis B infection are vaccinated against hepatitis B, and more than half miss opportunities to be vaccinated, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Infection.

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Four Novel Biomarkers May Predict Diabetic Kidney Damage

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 1 diabetes, a panel of four novel protein biomarkers may predict early kidney damage, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Diabetes Care.

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Neuromodulators Reduce Pain in Rheumatoid Arthritis

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Neuromodulators are superior to placebo for reducing pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but treatment is associated with adverse events; whereas muscle relaxants show no benefit for improving pain in RA, according to two reviews published online Jan. 18 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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First Test Approved to Help Detect Risk of PML

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The first test to help determine the risk of a rare brain infection among users of the drug Tysabri has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Tysabri

SSRIs Increase Fall Risk in Elderly Dementia Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Even at low doses, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) increase the risk of injuries due to falls in elderly dementia patients, and the risk increases further at higher doses and when hypnotics and sedatives are added, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Warfarin Patients With Head Trauma Need Second CT Scan

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For patients on warfarin with minor head trauma who have an initial negative computed tomography (CT) scan, 24-hour observation followed by an additional CT scan identifies the majority of cases of delayed bleeding, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Long-Term Adalimumab Safe, Effective for Psoriasis

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term efficacy of adalimumab is well maintained in patients who experience an initial response of 75 percent or greater improvement in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (PASI 75), according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Positive Patch Test Reaction Rates Similar for Elderly, Adults

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately two-thirds of older individuals have at least one positive patch test reaction to contact allergens, similar to the rates for adults and significantly increased compared with the rates for children, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Sleep Tied to Maintenance of Emotional Reactivity

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep is associated with enhanced emotional memory and maintenance of emotional reactivity compared with wake, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

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Taking Two or More Medications Increases Fall Rate

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The use of two or more prescription medications is associated with an increased risk of falls and fall-related injuries at home among young and middle-aged adults, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Injury Prevention.

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No Autoimmune Safety Signal for Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For women vaccinated with the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4), there is no evidence of an autoimmune safety signal, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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HIV Risk-Related Behaviors Down in the United States

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The number of men and women who reported engaging in HIV risk-related behaviors was lower in 2006 to 2010 compared with 2002, with the decline likely resulting from a decrease in sexual risk behaviors, according to a research published in the Jan. 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Reports.

Report

Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Loses Prognostic Factors Over Time

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The current staging system and postoperative nomograms, which are based on patient and tumor characteristics and predict prognosis after resection of retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS), are no longer significant one year after survival, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Cancer.

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Design Flaws Cast Doubt on Million Woman Study

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The largest study linking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to breast cancer, the Million Women Study (MWS), had flaws in its design and the findings do not satisfy the principles of causation, according to an evidence review published online Jan. 16 in the Journal of Family Planning & Reproductive Health Care.

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Contraceptives Eschewed by Half of Teenage Mothers

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Of the approximately 400,000 girls aged 15 to 19 who give birth each year in the United States, half of those with unintended pregnancies were using no birth control at the time they became pregnant, according to data published in the Jan. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Worse Outcomes for Stroke Patients With Delirium

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay N

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