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Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

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January 2012 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: February 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for January 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

High-Fiber Diet May Not Lower Risk of Diverticulosis

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- High dietary fiber intake was not associated with a lower prevalence of diverticulosis. In fact, people who ate a high-fiber diet and those having 15 or more bowel movements per week had a higher, not lower, prevalence of diverticulosis, according to research published in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

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Polypectomy Outcomes Similar to Surgical Resection

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with malignant colonic polyps who have similar clinical characteristics, management with either polypectomy or surgical resection results in comparable outcomes, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Not Enough Americans Being Screened for Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. residents are not being screened for cancer at the recommended levels, and screening rates vary by several demographic factors, according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Mutations in IDH1/2 Seen in Intrahepatic Bile Duct Cancers

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) are present in about a quarter of biliary tract carcinomas arising within the liver, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in The Oncologist.

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Sex Differences Exist in Disease-Linked Pain Intensity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Sex differences exist in specific disease-associated pain intensity, with women suffering a higher prevalence of pain for musculoskeletal, neuropathic, abdominal, and migraine-related conditions, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in The Journal of Pain.

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Oxaliplatin Improves Survival for Colorectal Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of oxaliplatin to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) improves survival for stage III colon cancer patients in diverse practice settings, including among older and minority patients, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Overuse of Health Care Services Understudied

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Overuse of health care services in the United States is an understudied problem, with the majority of research limited to a few interventions, according to a review published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Lansoprazole Does Not Improve Asthma Control in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For children with asthma without overt gastroesophageal reflux (GER), treatment with the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole is not associated with improved asthma control, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Unemployed Have Poorer Mental and Physical Health

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Unemployed adults are about half as likely to have health insurance as employed individuals; have poorer mental and physical health, regardless of their insurance status; and are less likely to receive needed medical care and prescriptions, according to a January data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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HealthGrades IDs Notable Hospitals for Clinical Excellence

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The top 5 percent of U.S. hospitals has more than a 30 percent lower risk-adjusted mortality across 17 procedures and diagnoses, compared with other hospitals, according to the 10th annual HealthGrades Hospital Quality and Clinical Excellence study published online Jan. 24.

Report

Statins May Reduce Risk for HCC in Hep B-Infected Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients, statin use is associated with a reduction in the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in a dose-dependent manner, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Gender, Family, Ambivalence Impact Live Liver Donation

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Gender, relationship to the recipient, and ambivalence toward donation all impact living liver donor's decisions, motives, and post-donation outcomes, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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First Test Approved to Help Detect Risk of PML

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The first test to help determine the risk of a rare brain infection among users of the drug Tysabri has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Tysabri

Chronic Hepatitis C May Benefit From New Antivirals

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Direct-acting antiviral agents may be effective for treating patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 who don't respond to peginterferon and ribavirin therapies, according to a study published in the Jan. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Liver Transplant Stabilizes Lung Function in Cystic Fibrosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For a select group of patients with cirrhosis due to cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD), liver transplantation can stabilize long-term lung function and nutritional status and reduce the need for intravenous antibiotics, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Bevacizumab Combo Improves Colorectal Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of bevacizumab to combination chemotherapy for the treatment of stage IV colorectal cancer increases overall survival, particularly for patients receiving irinotecan-based chemotherapy regimens, but is associated with increased rates of strokes and gastrointestinal (GI) perforations, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Editorial

U.S. Health Care Expenditure Still Unevenly Distributed

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Health care expenditure in the United States is still unevenly distributed, with 1 percent of the population accounting for approximately 20 percent of expenditure in 2008 and 2009, according to a January statistical brief published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Report

Cirrhosis Ups Disability, Health Care Utilization in Seniors

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Older individuals with cirrhosis have higher rates of health care utilization, disability, and requirements for informal caregiving than those without cirrhosis, according to a study published in the January issue of Hepatology.

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Inflammatory Bowel Disease Increasing in U.S., Europe

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are highest in Europe and North America, and are increasing, according to a review published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Lower Rate of IBD for Women Living in Sunnier Climates

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Living in the southern latitudes is associated with a reduced risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with residence at age 30 most strongly related to the risk, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Gut.

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CDC: 2010 Saw Decrease in Age-Adjusted Death Rates

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- From 2009 to 2010, age-adjusted death rates decreased and life expectancy increased, according to a Jan. 11 report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Report

Dementia Associated With More Hospital Admissions

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital admission rates for all causes, and for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs), are significantly higher among patients with dementia compared to older patients without dementia, according to a study published in the Jan. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Post-Op QOL Poor in Some Esophageal Cancer Survivors

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- While most esophageal cancer patients recover their pre-surgery health-related quality of life (HRQL), a notable percentage continue to suffer adverse effects from the surgery five years later, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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HCV Antivirals Cost-Effective for Injecting Drug Users

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Antivirals are cost-effective for injecting drug users (IDUs) where the chronic prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is less than 60 percent, according to a study published in the January issue of Hepatology.

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In-Hospital, 30-Day Standardized Mortality Measures Differ

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The mean risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs) differ for in-hospital and 30-day models, with wide variability across U.S. hospitals, according to a study published in the Jan. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Potential Genetic Marker of Colorectal Cancer Risk Found

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- There is an association between an increase in the degree of germline allele-specific expression (ASE) of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and the risk of common forms of colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a study published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Novel Hepatitis C Vaccine Induces T Cell Responses

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Adenovirus-based vaccines can generate strong, broad, long-lasting, and functional T cell responses against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in healthy people, according to a study published in the Jan. 4 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Cancer-Related Mortality Continues to Decrease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Overall cancer rates have decreased for men and remained stable for women, but mortality from cancer has declined for both men and women, according to a report from the American Cancer Society published online Jan. 4 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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GLP-1 Plays Role in Glucose Control After Gastric Bypass

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- There is a positive association between glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations and insulin concentrations following gastric bypass (GBP) surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting a role for GLP-1 in glucose control, according to a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Psych Symptoms Affect Key Subset With Celiac Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial subset of women with celiac disease report clinically relevant symptoms of depression and disordered eating, despite high adherence to a gluten-free diet, according to a study published online in Chronic Illness.

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