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Category: Gynecology | Monthly Briefing

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January 2012 Briefing - OBGYN & Women’s Health

Last Updated: February 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for January 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Breast Reexcision Rates Vary With Surgeon, Institution

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For women with invasive breast cancer who undergo partial mastectomy and have negative margins, reexcision rates vary substantially depending on the surgeon and institution, according to a retrospective chart review published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Similar Morbidity for Robotic, Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- While complication rates are similar between robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomies for the treatment of endometrial cancer, robotic treatment is significantly more costly than laparoscopic treatment, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Physician Overweight/Obesity Impacts Obesity Care

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Being overweight/obese has a significant impact on a physician's provision of obesity care, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in Obesity.

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Laparoscopy Acceptable for Staging Uterine Cancer

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive surgical staging of endometrial cancer can be performed laparoscopically with relatively small differences in recurrence rates compared to laparotomy, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Early Maternal Support Ups Hippocampal Volume in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal support during the preschool years has a positive effect on healthy hippocampal development, which is key to memory and stress modulation, according to an article published online Jan. 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Antiretroviral Medications Linked to Cleft Deformities

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) --Antiretroviral drugs prescribed for HIV-infected pregnant women to reduce risk of mother-to-child disease transmission may be linked to cleft lip and palate disorders in newborns, according to a study published in the January issue of Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal.

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Meta-Analysis: Statin Therapy Equally Effective in Women, Men

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Statin therapy is equally effective for decreasing cardiovascular events in women and men, according to a meta-analysis published in the Feb. 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Eye Contact Abnormal in Infants at Risk for Autism

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Infants at risk for developing autism spectrum disorders already show abnormalities in their patterns of eye contact in their first year, which may allow earlier intervention, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Current Biology.

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Education Reduces Distress During Breast Cancer Treatment

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Interventions such as telephone counseling can help women with early-stage breast cancer adjust to emotional distress stemming from the side effects of treatment, according to a study published in the February issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Preventive Health Services Missed in Half of Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- During periodic health examinations (PHEs), a variety of patient, physician, and visit factors together affect the recommendation and delivery of evidence-based preventive health services, with patients receiving only about half of those services for which they are due, according to research published in the February issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Fever, Epidural Combo Ups Adverse Neonatal Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- For women who receive epidural analgesia, an elevation in the maternal intrapartum temperature is associated with an increased risk of adverse neonatal events, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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A Child's Family Should Be Integral to Health Care Team

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians should ensure that collaborative relationships with patients and families are incorporated into all aspects of their professional practice, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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More Research Needed on Weaning of Addicted Infants

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- More research is necessary to identify the optimal treatment strategy for weaning infants with neonatal drug withdrawal, but updates for clinical identification and monitoring of opioid-exposed infants have been presented in a guidance statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Prenatal Testosterone Levels a Risk Factor for Language Delay

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- High prenatal testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of clinically significant language delay in the first three years of life for male children, but are associated with a reduced risk of language delay for female children, according to research published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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No Complications From Using Stored Red Blood Cells

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There is no significant difference in early complications, including measures of pulmonary function, immunologic status, or coagulation status, after using fresh versus standard issue red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Not Enough Americans Being Screened for Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. residents are not being screened for cancer at the recommended levels, and screening rates vary by several demographic factors, according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Thirteen New Loci Linked to Age of Menopause Onset

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Thirteen new genetic loci have been linked to age of menopause onset, implicating genes involved in DNA repair and immune function, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Nature Genetics.

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More Than 40 Percent of Adults With RA Are Inactive

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- More than 40 percent of adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are inactive, with lack of both strong motivation and belief in physical activity accounting for most of the excess inactivity, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Long Working Hours Linked to Increased Risk of Depression

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Working 11 or more hours a day is associated with a significant increase in the likelihood of a major depressive episode (MDE) among British civil servants, compared with working a seven to eight hour day, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in PLoS One.

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Radiation Benefits Mixed After Breast-Preserving Surgery

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with radiation therapy after excision of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in women age 60 is associated with a slight improvement in survival, but may increase the likelihood of eventual mastectomy, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Low Birth Weight May Be Risk Factor for Autism

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Low birth weight may be among potential environmental risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study of same-sex twins published online Dec. 2 in Psychological Medicine.

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Bevacizumab Efficacious for HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer, the addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy improves the pathological complete response (pCR), according to two studies published in the Jan. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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More Adverse QOL Issues in Young Breast Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women with breast cancer experience a decrease in their health-related quality of life (QOL), including increased psychological distress and fertility-related concerns, according to a review published Jan. 23 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Sex Differences Exist in Disease-Linked Pain Intensity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Sex differences exist in specific disease-associated pain intensity, with women suffering a higher prevalence of pain for musculoskeletal, neuropathic, abdominal, and migraine-related conditions, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in The Journal of Pain.

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Overuse of Health Care Services Understudied

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Overuse of health care services in the United States is an understudied problem, with the majority of research limited to a few interventions, according to a review published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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BRCA Carriers Have Improved Survival in Ovarian Cancer

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are associated with improved five-year survival, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Perfluorinated Compounds Reduce Immunity in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Increased exposure to perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) is associated with reduced immune response to childhood vaccinations, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Unemployed Have Poorer Mental and Physical Health

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Unemployed adults are about half as likely to have health insurance as employed individuals; have poorer mental and physical health, regardless of their insurance status; and are less likely to receive needed medical care and prescriptions, according to a January data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Anastrozole Sequence Doesn't Significantly Improve Survival

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Sequencing two years of tamoxifen (TAM) and then three years of anastrozole (ANA) in the first five years of endocrine therapy leads to small, but nonsignificant improvements in breast cancer recurrence, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Fetal Growth Not Linked to Childhood Asthma

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Fetal growth restriction or acceleration is not associated with asthma symptoms in childhood, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Three New Breast Cancer Susceptibility SNPs Identified

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Three new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) conferring susceptibility to breast cancer have been identified, according to a letter published online Jan. 22 in Nature Genetics.

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Inadequate Hep B Vaccinations for High-Risk Adults

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately half of all adults at high risk of hepatitis B infection are vaccinated against hepatitis B, and more than half miss opportunities to be vaccinated, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Infection.

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HIV Risk-Related Behaviors Down in the United States

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The number of men and women who reported engaging in HIV risk-related behaviors was lower in 2006 to 2010 compared with 2002, with the decline likely resulting from a decrease in sexual risk behaviors, according to a research published in the Jan. 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Reports.

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No Autoimmune Safety Signal for Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For women vaccinated with the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4), there is no evidence of an autoimmune safety signal, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Sexual Activity Safe for Most Cardiovascular Disease Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For most individuals with stable cardiovascular disease (CVD), sexual activity is safe, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association published online Jan. 19 in Circulation.

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Design Flaws Cast Doubt on Million Woman Study

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The largest study linking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to breast cancer, the Million Women Study (MWS), had flaws in its design and the findings do not satisfy the principles of causation, according to an evidence review published online Jan. 16 in the Journal of Family Planning & Reproductive Health Care.

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Contraceptives Eschewed by Half of Teenage Mothers

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Of the approximately 400,000 girls aged 15 to 19 who give birth each year in the United States, half of those with unintended pregnancies were using no birth control at the time they became pregnant, according to data published in the Jan. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Ability to Predict Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence Limited

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A published nomogram from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) is imperfect for predicting the risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) following excision of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Backscattering Intensity Measure May Help ID CIN Grade

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Use of backscattering intensity measurements in optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is influenced by perceptual and or cognitive bias, according to a study published in the January issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Study IDs Optimal Interval Between Bone Density Tests

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The recommended bone mineral density (BMD) screening interval is approximately 16 years for postmenopausal women with normal BMD, 4.5 years for women with moderate osteopenia, and one year for women with advanced osteopenia, according to a study published in the Jan. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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No Safe Threshold Found for Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Specific gestational timing of prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with physical features of fetal alcohol syndrome, with no evidence of a threshold, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Prevalence of Obesity Unchanged in Adults/Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity in adults and children/adolescents in the United States has remained unchanged in recent years, according to two studies published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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No Long-Term Benefit of Caffeine for Apnea in Preemies

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal caffeine therapy for apnea of prematurity is no longer associated with increased survival without disability when assessed at five-year follow-up, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Dual Inhibition of HER2 Beats Single Agent in Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer with two anti-HER2 agents (lapatinib and trastuzumab) is superior to treatment with single-agent therapy, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in The Lancet.

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Excess Weight Found to Double the Odds of Acne in Teen Girls

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obese girls are twice as likely to have moderate to severe acne, but this is not the case for overweight boys, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Untreated Sleep Apnea Linked to Cardio Mortality in Women

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in women, but continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment reduces the risk of mortality, according to a study published in the Jan. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Access to Quality Primary Care Reduces Mortality Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Greater access to high-quality primary medical care that includes features of comprehensiveness, patient-centeredness, and extended office hours is associated with a reduced risk of death, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Patients With Breast Cancer Lack Knowledge of the Disease

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Many early-stage breast cancer survivors lack knowledge about their disease and report not being involved in treatment decisions, although most receive treatment consistent with their goals, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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Viral Load Significant Factor in HIV-1 Transmission

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In serodiscordant couples, higher HIV-1 RNA levels in the infected partner significantly increase the risk of HIV-1 transmission, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Maternal Asthma Meds Not Linked to Most Birth Defects

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Use of asthma medications in early pregnancy is not associated with most birth defects, but positive associations are present for a few specific defects, including isolated esophageal and anorectal atresia and omphalocele, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Young Women Often Perceive Their Weight Gain Inaccurately

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For young women of reproductive age, self-perceptions of weight gain are often inaccurate, and are affected by race/ethnicity and contraceptive use, according to a study published online Dec. 2 in the Journal of Women's Health.

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Maternal Antidepressants Up Infant Pulmonary Hypertension

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of antidepressants, specifically selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), during pregnancy increases the risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension in newborns, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in BMJ.

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U.S. Health Care Expenditure Still Unevenly Distributed

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Health care expenditure in the United States is still unevenly distributed, with 1 percent of the population accounting for approximately 20 percent of expenditure in 2008 and 2009, according to a January statistical brief published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Physical Activity in Work or Leisure Tied to Lower MI Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity during work or leisure time is associated with a significantly lower risk of myocardial infarction (MI), according to a multinational study published online Jan. 11 in the European Heart Journal.

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Parabens Seen in Almost All Breast Mastectomy Samples

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- One or more esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) are seen in 99 percent of post-mastectomy, primary breast cancer tissue samples, and their concentrations vary within and between breasts, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in the Journal of Applied Toxicology.

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Low Risk of Cardiac Arrest in Marathon Runners

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- While the overall risk of cardiac arrest during a marathon or half-marathon is low, the risk is higher for those participating in marathons than half-marathons and for men than women, particularly for men with underlying hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or atherosclerotic coronary disease, according to a study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Three Embryos Should Never Be Implanted in IVF

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The decision to implant one or two embryos in women during in vitro fertilization (IVF) should account for maternal factors, including age, but three or more embryos should never be implanted, regardless of age, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in The Lancet.

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CDC: 2010 Saw Decrease in Age-Adjusted Death Rates

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- From 2009 to 2010, age-adjusted death rates decreased and life expectancy increased, according to a Jan. 11 report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Gestational Hypothyroidism Higher Than Estimated

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in six pregnant women who are tested suffer from gestational hypothyroidism, but less than a quarter of pregnant women undergo screening, according to a study published online Dec. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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CDC: Binge Drinking Prevalence High in United States

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- About one in six adults in the United States regularly engages in binge drinking, which accounts for more than 40,000 alcohol-related deaths every year, according to research published in the Jan. 10 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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A Broken Heart Does Increase Heart Attack Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The death of a significant person in someone's life is associated with a significantly increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI) for the grieving individual in the days following the death, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Circulation.

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Benefit of Aspirin in Primary Prevention Questioned

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals without prior cardiovascular disease (CVD), aspirin prophylaxis does not reduce cardiovascular death or cancer mortality, although it is associated with reductions in nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), according to a meta-analysis published online Jan. 9 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Most Parents Communicate BRCA Test Results to Offspring

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of parents who get tested for BRCA1/2 mutations share the test results with their offspring, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Cancer.

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Adiponectin Tied to Dementia, Alzheimer's Risk in Women

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Plasma levels of adiponectin are an independent risk factor for all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in women, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Statins Increase Diabetes Risk for Postmenopausal Women

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women taking statin medications have an increased risk of incident diabetes mellitus (DM), according to an analysis published online Jan. 9 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Larger Trabecular Holes Explain Bone Fragility in Diabetes

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The higher fracture risk observed in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may be due, in part, to the larger average hole size and, consequently, the more porous nature of their trabecular bone microarchitecture, according to a study published in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Antiestrogens May Counter Increased Skin Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer patients receiving antiestrogen therapy, there doesn't appear to be an excess risk of secondary cutaneous melanoma, according to a study published in the January issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

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In-Hospital, 30-Day Standardized Mortality Measures Differ

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The mean risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs) differ for in-hospital and 30-day models, with wide variability across U.S. hospitals, according to a study published in the Jan. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Shedding Persists in Herpes Even With High-Dose Antivirals

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Short episodes of subclinical shedding or reactivation persist in herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, even in patients on high doses of antiviral therapy, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in The Lancet.

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HPV Vaccine Doesn't Lull Girls Into Complacency About Sex

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Few teenage girls receiving the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine perceive a reduced need for safer sexual behavior following their first inoculation, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Expected Body Weight's Role in Eating Disorder Treatment Studied

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A commonly agreed upon way to determine expected body weight (EBW) for adolescents with eating disorders, such as the body mass index (BMI) percentile, is a critical component of the diagnosis and management of these disorders, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

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Intrapartum Antibiotics Reduce Infant Strep B Infection Globally

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Intrapartum prophylactic antibiotics substantially reduce infant streptococcus B infection worldwide, but the practice should be more widely adopted in low-income settings, according to research published online Jan. 5 in The Lancet.

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Vaccine Helps Prevent HSV-1 Genital Disease and Infection

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An investigational vaccine effectively prevents herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) but not HSV type 2 (HSV-2) genital disease and infection, according to a study published in the Jan. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cancer-Related Mortality Continues to Decrease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Overall cancer rates have decreased for men and remained stable for women, but mortality from cancer has declined for both men and women, according to a report from the American Cancer Society published online Jan. 4 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Half of Older Women Report Sexual Activity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Half of older women report engaging in sexual activity within the previous month, with the majority reporting satisfaction with their sex life, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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U.S. Experiencing Multiple Pregnancy 'Epidemic'

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Once comprising only 2 percent of births, the incidence of multiple births has skyrocketed over the last 30 years, according to a January data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Genetics Play Key Role in Infant Postnatal Weight Gain

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal weight gain in healthy preterm newborns shows a high level of heritability, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

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Burden of Treatment in Diabetes Rarely Addressed

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Although the burden of diabetes treatments is discussed in more than 90 percent of primary care office visits, problem-solving efforts are made in only about one-third of cases, according to a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Bariatric Surgery Tied to Reduced CVD Events, Mortality

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- For obese individuals, bariatric surgery is associated with significantly reduced incidence of cardiovascular events, and decreased cardiovascular death, versus usual care, according to a study published in the Jan. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hormone Receptor Levels Predict Trastuzumab Effect

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced breast cancer whose tumors also express hormone receptors may be less responsive to the addition of trastuzumab to chemotherapy, suggesting that hormone receptor expression has a predictive role in determining response to therapy, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Psych Symptoms Affect Key Subset With Celiac Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial subset of women with celiac disease report clinically relevant symptoms of depression and disordered eating, despite high adherence to a gluten-free diet, according to a study published online in Chronic Illness.

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Maternal Diabetes, Low Income Up ADHD Risk in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Children exposed to maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low socioeconomic status (SES), especially in combination, are at an increased risk of developing childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Standardized Count Practices Reduce Retained Surgical Items

MONDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of quality improvement strategies to standardize count practices can reduce the incidence of unintentional retained surgical items (RSIs) in operating rooms (ORs), according to a study published in the January issue of the AORN Journal.

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