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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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January 2012 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: February 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for January 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Kalydeco Approved to Treat Rare Form of Cystic Fibrosis

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Kalydeco (ivacaftor) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat the root cause of a rare form of the inherited disease cystic fibrosis (CF).

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Sixty Percent Burn Size Crucial Threshold in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Children with burns covering 60 percent of their body or more are at much higher risk for complications and death and should receive specialized care, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in The Lancet.

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Early Maternal Support Ups Hippocampal Volume in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal support during the preschool years has a positive effect on healthy hippocampal development, which is key to memory and stress modulation, according to an article published online Jan. 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Fructose Linked to Increased Cardiometabolic Risk in Teens

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In adolescents, consumption of fructose is associated with multiple markers of cardiometabolic risk, and this association seems to be mediated by visceral adipose tissue (VAT), according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

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Antiretroviral Medications Linked to Cleft Deformities

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) --Antiretroviral drugs prescribed for HIV-infected pregnant women to reduce risk of mother-to-child disease transmission may be linked to cleft lip and palate disorders in newborns, according to a study published in the January issue of Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal.

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Booster Seat Use Inconsistent When Carpooling

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Booster seat use among children aged 4 to 8 years is inconsistent during carpooling, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Eye Contact Abnormal in Infants at Risk for Autism

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Infants at risk for developing autism spectrum disorders already show abnormalities in their patterns of eye contact in their first year, which may allow earlier intervention, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Current Biology.

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More Research Needed on Weaning of Addicted Infants

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- More research is necessary to identify the optimal treatment strategy for weaning infants with neonatal drug withdrawal, but updates for clinical identification and monitoring of opioid-exposed infants have been presented in a guidance statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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A Child's Family Should Be Integral to Health Care Team

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians should ensure that collaborative relationships with patients and families are incorporated into all aspects of their professional practice, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Fever, Epidural Combo Ups Adverse Neonatal Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- For women who receive epidural analgesia, an elevation in the maternal intrapartum temperature is associated with an increased risk of adverse neonatal events, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Prenatal Testosterone Levels a Risk Factor for Language Delay

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- High prenatal testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of clinically significant language delay in the first three years of life for male children, but are associated with a reduced risk of language delay for female children, according to research published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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Many Obesity Interventions Cost-Effective in Long-Term

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of obesity prevention interventions are cost-effective in the long-term, with the most favorable interventions being those which modify a target population's environment, according to a review published online Jan. 17 in Obesity Reviews.

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Better Dysglycemia Screening With Fasting Triglyceride Levels

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of fasting triglyceride levels to current American Diabetes Association (ADA) screening models improves the diagnostic accuracy of dysglycemia in overweight or obese children, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Diabetes Care.

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Anaphylactic Shock After Immunizations Is Rare

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Anaphylactic shock following immunization is extremely rare in children, and in the few reported cases, some children have a delayed onset of symptoms, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Low Birth Weight May Be Risk Factor for Autism

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Low birth weight may be among potential environmental risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study of same-sex twins published online Dec. 2 in Psychological Medicine.

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Risk-Factor Burden Impacts Lifetime Risk of Cardio Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Variation in risk-factor burden results in considerable differences in the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease, and these differences are consistent across race and birth cohorts, according to a meta-analysis published in the Jan. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Sildenafil Shows Potential for Lymphatic Malformations

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with sildenafil results in regression of lymphatic malformations in children, according to three cases presented in a letter published in the Jan. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Overuse of Health Care Services Understudied

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Overuse of health care services in the United States is an understudied problem, with the majority of research limited to a few interventions, according to a review published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Reduced Brain Activity Seen in Prereaders With Dyslexia Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Prereading children with a family history of developmental dyslexia (DD) show reduced activity in the bilateral occipitotemporal and left temporoparietal brain regions during phonological processing exercises, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Perfluorinated Compounds Reduce Immunity in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Increased exposure to perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) is associated with reduced immune response to childhood vaccinations, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lansoprazole Does Not Improve Asthma Control in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For children with asthma without overt gastroesophageal reflux (GER), treatment with the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole is not associated with improved asthma control, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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HealthGrades IDs Notable Hospitals for Clinical Excellence

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The top 5 percent of U.S. hospitals has more than a 30 percent lower risk-adjusted mortality across 17 procedures and diagnoses, compared with other hospitals, according to the 10th annual HealthGrades Hospital Quality and Clinical Excellence study published online Jan. 24.

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Parental Role in Successful Child Weight Loss Unclear

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Parents should be involved in weight loss treatment programs for their obese children, but more research is needed to identify specific approaches that enable parents and adult caregivers (PACs) to be more effective agents in assisting obese children with weight loss, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published online Jan. 23 in Circulation.

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Fetal Growth Not Linked to Childhood Asthma

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Fetal growth restriction or acceleration is not associated with asthma symptoms in childhood, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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National Adolescent Hep A Vaccine Coverage Is Low

TUESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatitis A vaccine (HepA) coverage is low among adolescents nationally, but rates are higher among states with a vaccination requirement, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Effects of Severe, Childhood Brain Injury Long Lasting

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- There is a high risk of persisting deficits following severe, childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Many Tweens Don't Follow Correct Sun Behaviors

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- At least half of 10 year olds report experiencing sunburn in the past year and, as they hit their teen years, they report spending more unprotected time in the sun to get a tan, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Co-Occurring Conditions Impact Change in Autism Disorders

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the presence of co-occurring neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions is associated with a change in ASD diagnosis, and these conditions vary with the age of the child, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Dosing Errors Occur With IV Acetaminophen in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a new intravenous formulation of acetaminophen is associated with dosing errors in neonates, infants, and small children, and evaluation and management of these dosing errors are similar to oral overdose, according to a report published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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No Autoimmune Safety Signal for Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For women vaccinated with the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4), there is no evidence of an autoimmune safety signal, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Contraceptives Eschewed by Half of Teenage Mothers

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Of the approximately 400,000 girls aged 15 to 19 who give birth each year in the United States, half of those with unintended pregnancies were using no birth control at the time they became pregnant, according to data published in the Jan. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Age-Related Intelligence Changes Linked to Genetics

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic factors account for some of the changes in intelligence that occur between childhood and old age, according to a letter published online Jan. 18 in Nature.

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Peds Liver Transplant Patients Tolerate Drug Withdrawal

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric recipients of a living donor liver transplant, immunosuppression withdrawal is feasible, with most patients able to remain off therapy for at least one year with normal graft function, according to a pilot study published in the Jan. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Liver Transplant Stabilizes Lung Function in Cystic Fibrosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For a select group of patients with cirrhosis due to cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD), liver transplantation can stabilize long-term lung function and nutritional status and reduce the need for intravenous antibiotics, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Meningitis B Vaccine Immunogenic in Adolescents

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Two doses of the four-component Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (4CMenB) vaccine is highly immunogenic in adolescents, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in The Lancet.

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Juvenile Arthritis Disease-State Cut-Off Values Established

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Using the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS), disease-state cut-off values have been established for pediatric patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), according to research published online Jan. 9 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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No Safe Threshold Found for Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Specific gestational timing of prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with physical features of fetal alcohol syndrome, with no evidence of a threshold, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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No Long-Term Benefit of Caffeine for Apnea in Preemies

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal caffeine therapy for apnea of prematurity is no longer associated with increased survival without disability when assessed at five-year follow-up, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prevalence of Obesity Unchanged in Adults/Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of obesity in adults and children/adolescents in the United States has remained unchanged in recent years, according to two studies published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Increased Pathologic Fracture Risk in Staph Osteomyelitis

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Children with osteomyelitis secondary to Staphylococcus aureus infection have increased risk of pathologic fracture, according to a study published in the Jan. 4 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Practice Differs for Cardiac Screening in ADHD Treatment

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable variation in the attitudes, barriers, and practices of pediatricians for cardiac screening before initiation of stimulant treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Jan 16 in Pediatrics.

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Maternal Asthma Meds Not Linked to Most Birth Defects

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Use of asthma medications in early pregnancy is not associated with most birth defects, but positive associations are present for a few specific defects, including isolated esophageal and anorectal atresia and omphalocele, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Drowning Hospitalizations for Peds Down in Recent Years

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalization rates for pediatric drowning have decreased over the past 14 years among children of all ages, with males continuing to have higher hospitalization rates than females, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Parents Are Primary Target for Pediatric Obesity Programs

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Parents are the primary agents of change in most family- and home-based pediatric overweight and obesity intervention programs, according to research published online Jan. 6 in Obesity Reviews.

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Fatal Case of Measles Without Rash Found in Young Woman

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A fatality from measles with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but without rash, has been reported, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Impaired White Matter ID'd in Internet Addiction Disorder

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers with internet addiction disorder (IAD) show impaired white matter structure, indicated by reductions in fractional anisotropy (FA), according to a study published online Jan. 11 in PLoS One.

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Surgical Techniques Affect Outcome in Scoliosis Surgery

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), eight factors correlate significantly with maintenance of kyphosis, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in Spine.

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Maternal Antidepressants Up Infant Pulmonary Hypertension

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of antidepressants, specifically selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), during pregnancy increases the risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension in newborns, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in BMJ.

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U.S. Health Care Expenditure Still Unevenly Distributed

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Health care expenditure in the United States is still unevenly distributed, with 1 percent of the population accounting for approximately 20 percent of expenditure in 2008 and 2009, according to a January statistical brief published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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CDC: 2010 Saw Decrease in Age-Adjusted Death Rates

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- From 2009 to 2010, age-adjusted death rates decreased and life expectancy increased, according to a Jan. 11 report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Hypertension Registry IDs Features of Pediatric HTN

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of data from the Tracking Outcomes and Practice in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension (TOPP) registry has identified clinical features specific to the care of children with pulmonary hypertension, according to research published online Jan. 11 in The Lancet.

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Single Oral Azithromycin Dose Effective for Yaws

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A single oral-dose of azithromycin is non-inferior compared with the standard recommended therapy of benzathine benzylpenicillin for the treatment of yaws, an endemic treponematosis, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in The Lancet.

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Occasional Marijuana Use Not Tied to Adverse Lung Function

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Occasional and low cumulative marijuana use does not adversely affect lung function, according to a study published in the Jan. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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No Rise in Intussusception After Rotavirus Shot Revival

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The reintroduction of the rotavirus vaccination in the United States has not resulted in an increase in the rate of infant hospital discharges for intussusception, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Most Parents Communicate BRCA Test Results to Offspring

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of parents who get tested for BRCA1/2 mutations share the test results with their offspring, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Cancer.

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Brain Changes Seen After First-Episode Psychosis in Teens

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Children and adolescents with schizophrenia have significantly greater brain gray matter (GM) volume loss and increased frontal lobe cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume compared with adolescents without a diagnosis of psychosis, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Ped Heart Surgery Deaths Higher at Low Volume Centers

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Postoperative mortality rates from complications after pediatric heart surgery are higher at centers with a lower volume of cases, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Sucrose Beats Facilitated Tucking for Preemie Pain Relief

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Oral sucrose alone, or in combination with facilitated tucking (FT), is effective for reducing heel stick-related pain in preterm infants, whereas FT alone has limited analgesic effect, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Evidence Suggests Limited Benefit of Dietary ADHD Therapy

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- For children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who fail to respond to medication or whose parents are opposed to pharmacotherapy, supplements or specific dietary patterns may be useful, according to a review published online Jan. 9 in Pediatrics.

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TACSTD2 Gene May Affect Postnatal Growth, Fat Mass

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Altered expression of the TACSTD2 gene may be associated with postnatal growth and childhood fat mass, although lack of association between postnatal growth or fat mass and a methylation proxy SNP in this gene may indicate confounding, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in Diabetes.

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Poor Sleep Worsens Health in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may have difficulty getting a good night's sleep, resulting in difficulty controlling blood sugar and decreased performance in school, according to a study published in the January issue of SLEEP.

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Saffold Virus Found in Spinal Fluid of Two Children

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Saffold virus (SAFV), which can cause serious invasive infection in children, has been identified in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two children in Denmark, according to a viral genotyping study published in the January issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Expected Body Weight's Role in Eating Disorder Treatment Studied

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A commonly agreed upon way to determine expected body weight (EBW) for adolescents with eating disorders, such as the body mass index (BMI) percentile, is a critical component of the diagnosis and management of these disorders, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

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HPV Vaccine Doesn't Lull Girls Into Complacency About Sex

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Few teenage girls receiving the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine perceive a reduced need for safer sexual behavior following their first inoculation, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Prevalence of Sleep Problems Identified in Early Childhood

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- For young children, the overall prevalence of parent-reported sleep problems is 10 percent, and remains stable during the first three years of life, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

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U.S. Experiencing Multiple Pregnancy 'Epidemic'

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Once comprising only 2 percent of births, the incidence of multiple births has skyrocketed over the last 30 years, according to a January data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Genetics Play Key Role in Infant Postnatal Weight Gain

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal weight gain in healthy preterm newborns shows a high level of heritability, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

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Montelukast Doesn't Cut Upper Respiratory Infection Incidence

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For young children, 12-week prophylactic treatment with montelukast does not reduce the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URIs), according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

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Barriers to Physical Activity in Child Care Centers Identified

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For U.S. children in child care centers, physical activity and development may be negatively impacted by societal priorities of safety and school readiness and financial concerns, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

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Pneumonia Vaccine Approved for Older People

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The Prevnar 13 bacterial pneumonia vaccine has been approved for people aged 50 and older, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said.

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Maternal Diabetes, Low Income Up ADHD Risk in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Children exposed to maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low socioeconomic status (SES), especially in combination, are at an increased risk of developing childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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