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Category: Pulmonology | Monthly Briefing

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January 2012 Briefing - Pulmonology

Last Updated: February 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for January 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Kalydeco Approved to Treat Rare Form of Cystic Fibrosis

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Kalydeco (ivacaftor) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat the root cause of a rare form of the inherited disease cystic fibrosis (CF).

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COPD Assessment Test Predicts Exacerbation Severity

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The COPD Assessment Test (CAT) provides a reliable score of exacerbation severity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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New PCR-Based Assay Better Predicts Lung Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A new quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay can better identify which patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are at higher risk of mortality after surgical resection, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in The Lancet.

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No Complications From Using Stored Red Blood Cells

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There is no significant difference in early complications, including measures of pulmonary function, immunologic status, or coagulation status, after using fresh versus standard issue red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Sex Differences Exist in Disease-Linked Pain Intensity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Sex differences exist in specific disease-associated pain intensity, with women suffering a higher prevalence of pain for musculoskeletal, neuropathic, abdominal, and migraine-related conditions, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in The Journal of Pain.

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Overuse of Health Care Services Understudied

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Overuse of health care services in the United States is an understudied problem, with the majority of research limited to a few interventions, according to a review published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Unemployed Have Poorer Mental and Physical Health

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Unemployed adults are about half as likely to have health insurance as employed individuals; have poorer mental and physical health, regardless of their insurance status; and are less likely to receive needed medical care and prescriptions, according to a January data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Lansoprazole Does Not Improve Asthma Control in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For children with asthma without overt gastroesophageal reflux (GER), treatment with the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole is not associated with improved asthma control, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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HealthGrades IDs Notable Hospitals for Clinical Excellence

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The top 5 percent of U.S. hospitals has more than a 30 percent lower risk-adjusted mortality across 17 procedures and diagnoses, compared with other hospitals, according to the 10th annual HealthGrades Hospital Quality and Clinical Excellence study published online Jan. 24.

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Fetal Growth Not Linked to Childhood Asthma

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Fetal growth restriction or acceleration is not associated with asthma symptoms in childhood, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Sleep Disturbance Linked to Cardiometabolic Disease Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep duration and sleep disturbance are associated with cardiometabolic disease, according to a study published online Dec. 12 in the Journal of Sleep Research.

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Mild-to-Moderate Asthma Frequently Non-Eosinophilic

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately half of all patients with mild-to-moderate asthma are persistently non-eosinophilic, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Sexual Activity Safe for Most Cardiovascular Disease Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For most individuals with stable cardiovascular disease (CVD), sexual activity is safe, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association published online Jan. 19 in Circulation.

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Liver Transplant Stabilizes Lung Function in Cystic Fibrosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For a select group of patients with cirrhosis due to cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD), liver transplantation can stabilize long-term lung function and nutritional status and reduce the need for intravenous antibiotics, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Circulating Tumor Cells Predict Small-Cell Lung CA Prognosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and the change in CTC number after one cycle of chemotherapy predict prognosis in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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No Long-Term Benefit of Caffeine for Apnea in Preemies

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal caffeine therapy for apnea of prematurity is no longer associated with increased survival without disability when assessed at five-year follow-up, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Airway Smooth Muscle Layer Has Key Role in Asthma

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Although extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in the airway smooth muscle (ASM) layer is not different for patients with asthma and controls, it is associated with the dynamics of airway function in patients with asthma, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Allergy.

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Untreated Sleep Apnea Linked to Cardio Mortality in Women

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in women, but continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment reduces the risk of mortality, according to a study published in the Jan. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Vitamin D Supplements Do Not Reduce COPD Exacerbations

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), high-dose vitamin D supplementation does not reduce the incidence of exacerbations, according to a study published in the Jan. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Maternal Asthma Meds Not Linked to Most Birth Defects

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Use of asthma medications in early pregnancy is not associated with most birth defects, but positive associations are present for a few specific defects, including isolated esophageal and anorectal atresia and omphalocele, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Fatal Case of Measles Without Rash Found in Young Woman

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A fatality from measles with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but without rash, has been reported, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Maternal Antidepressants Up Infant Pulmonary Hypertension

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of antidepressants, specifically selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), during pregnancy increases the risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension in newborns, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in BMJ.

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U.S. Health Care Expenditure Still Unevenly Distributed

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Health care expenditure in the United States is still unevenly distributed, with 1 percent of the population accounting for approximately 20 percent of expenditure in 2008 and 2009, according to a January statistical brief published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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CDC: 2010 Saw Decrease in Age-Adjusted Death Rates

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- From 2009 to 2010, age-adjusted death rates decreased and life expectancy increased, according to a Jan. 11 report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Dementia Associated With More Hospital Admissions

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital admission rates for all causes, and for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs), are significantly higher among patients with dementia compared to older patients without dementia, according to a study published in the Jan. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Occasional Marijuana Use Not Tied to Adverse Lung Function

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Occasional and low cumulative marijuana use does not adversely affect lung function, according to a study published in the Jan. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Nicotine Replacement Therapy Doesn't Avert Smoking Relapse

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals who have quit smoking, use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) may not impact relapse rates, according to a meta-analysis published online Jan. 10 in Tobacco Control.

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Losartan Halts Smoke-Related Lung Damage in Mice

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Losartan, an angiotensin receptor type 1 blocker used to antagonize transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, can prevent cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung damage in a mouse model, according to a study published in the Jan. 3 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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ROS1 Rearrangements Seen in Small Subset of NSCLC Tumors

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 2 percent of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have rearrangements of the ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase gene, with clinical characteristics similar to those seen in ALK-rearranged NSCLC, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Poor Sleep Worsens Health in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may have difficulty getting a good night's sleep, resulting in difficulty controlling blood sugar and decreased performance in school, according to a study published in the January issue of SLEEP.

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In-Hospital, 30-Day Standardized Mortality Measures Differ

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The mean risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs) differ for in-hospital and 30-day models, with wide variability across U.S. hospitals, according to a study published in the Jan. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Prevalence of Sleep Problems Identified in Early Childhood

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- For young children, the overall prevalence of parent-reported sleep problems is 10 percent, and remains stable during the first three years of life, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

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Cancer-Related Mortality Continues to Decrease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Overall cancer rates have decreased for men and remained stable for women, but mortality from cancer has declined for both men and women, according to a report from the American Cancer Society published online Jan. 4 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Montelukast Doesn't Cut Upper Respiratory Infection Incidence

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For young children, 12-week prophylactic treatment with montelukast does not reduce the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URIs), according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

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