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Category: Nephrology | Monthly Briefing

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January 2012 Briefing - Nephrology

Last Updated: February 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nephrology for January 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Fenofibrate Found Safe in Diabetes With Renal Impairment

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term daily use of fenofibrate is beneficial for patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment and is not associated with an increase in drug-related safety concerns compared with those with mild renal impairment, according to research published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Drug Approved for Advanced Kidney Cancer

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Inlyta (axitinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma in people who haven't responded to another drug. Six medications had been sanctioned previously for advanced kidney cancer, the agency said.

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Steroid-Sparing Renal Transplant Yields Successful Outcomes

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Rapid discontinuation of prednisone (RDP) five days after renal transplantation from a living (LD) or deceased donor (DD) yields acceptable 10-year patient and graft outcomes, according to research published online Jan. 26 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Not Enough Americans Being Screened for Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. residents are not being screened for cancer at the recommended levels, and screening rates vary by several demographic factors, according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Exposure to Iodinated Contrast Media Affects Thyroid Function

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to iodinated contrast media (ICM), which are frequently used during imaging procedures, is associated with changes in thyroid function, specifically an increased risk of developing incident hyperthyroidism and incident overt hypothyroidism, according to a study published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Positive Affirmation Improves Medication Adherence

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patient education (PE) enhanced with positive affirmation (PA) improves medication adherence over education alone in African-Americans with hypertension, but it does not lead to significant improvements in blood pressure (BP) reduction, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Adrenalectomy Rates Remain High in Radical Nephrectomy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- During a recent 10-year period, the rate of ipsilateral adrenalectomy at the time of radical nephrectomy decreased slightly, according to a study published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Overuse of Health Care Services Understudied

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Overuse of health care services in the United States is an understudied problem, with the majority of research limited to a few interventions, according to a review published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Unemployed Have Poorer Mental and Physical Health

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Unemployed adults are about half as likely to have health insurance as employed individuals; have poorer mental and physical health, regardless of their insurance status; and are less likely to receive needed medical care and prescriptions, according to a January data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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HealthGrades IDs Notable Hospitals for Clinical Excellence

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The top 5 percent of U.S. hospitals has more than a 30 percent lower risk-adjusted mortality across 17 procedures and diagnoses, compared with other hospitals, according to the 10th annual HealthGrades Hospital Quality and Clinical Excellence study published online Jan. 24.

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Four Novel Biomarkers May Predict Diabetic Kidney Damage

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 1 diabetes, a panel of four novel protein biomarkers may predict early kidney damage, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Diabetes Care.

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U.S. Health Care Expenditure Still Unevenly Distributed

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Health care expenditure in the United States is still unevenly distributed, with 1 percent of the population accounting for approximately 20 percent of expenditure in 2008 and 2009, according to a January statistical brief published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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CDC: 2010 Saw Decrease in Age-Adjusted Death Rates

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- From 2009 to 2010, age-adjusted death rates decreased and life expectancy increased, according to a Jan. 11 report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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In-Hospital, 30-Day Standardized Mortality Measures Differ

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The mean risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs) differ for in-hospital and 30-day models, with wide variability across U.S. hospitals, according to a study published in the Jan. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Hyperuricemia Is Independent Risk Factor for Incident CKD

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes and normal kidney function are twice as likely to develop incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) if they have hyperuricemia, according to a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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