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Category: Pathology | Monthly Briefing

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January 2012 Briefing - Pathology

Last Updated: February 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pathology for January 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Breast Reexcision Rates Vary With Surgeon, Institution

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For women with invasive breast cancer who undergo partial mastectomy and have negative margins, reexcision rates vary substantially depending on the surgeon and institution, according to a retrospective chart review published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Site of Fatty Acid Storage in the Body Varies With Activity

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- During eating, free fatty acids are preferentially stored in upper-body fat in both men and women, but during walking they are preferentially stored in lower-body fat in women, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes.

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High-Fiber Diet May Not Lower Risk of Diverticulosis

TUESDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- High dietary fiber intake was not associated with a lower prevalence of diverticulosis. In fact, people who ate a high-fiber diet and those having 15 or more bowel movements per week had a higher, not lower, prevalence of diverticulosis, according to research published in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

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Eye Contact Abnormal in Infants at Risk for Autism

MONDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Infants at risk for developing autism spectrum disorders already show abnormalities in their patterns of eye contact in their first year, which may allow earlier intervention, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Current Biology.

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Prenatal Testosterone Levels a Risk Factor for Language Delay

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- High prenatal testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of clinically significant language delay in the first three years of life for male children, but are associated with a reduced risk of language delay for female children, according to research published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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No Complications From Using Stored Red Blood Cells

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There is no significant difference in early complications, including measures of pulmonary function, immunologic status, or coagulation status, after using fresh versus standard issue red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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New PCR-Based Assay Better Predicts Lung Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A new quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay can better identify which patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are at higher risk of mortality after surgical resection, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in The Lancet.

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Testing Patterns to Diagnose Neuropathy Vary Widely

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy undergo a median of four tests, with variability seen in testing patterns, according to a study published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Not Enough Americans Being Screened for Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. residents are not being screened for cancer at the recommended levels, and screening rates vary by several demographic factors, according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Thirteen New Loci Linked to Age of Menopause Onset

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Thirteen new genetic loci have been linked to age of menopause onset, implicating genes involved in DNA repair and immune function, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Nature Genetics.

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Mutations in IDH1/2 Seen in Intrahepatic Bile Duct Cancers

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) are present in about a quarter of biliary tract carcinomas arising within the liver, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in The Oncologist.

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Oral HPV Infection Prevalence in U.S. Close to 7 Percent

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, the prevalence of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is 6.9 percent, with higher prevalence in men than women, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Deaths From Myocardial Infarction Halved in England

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- From 2002 to 2010 in England, there was a decrease of about half in the total mortality rate for acute myocardial infarction, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in BMJ.

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New Pathway Inhibits TRAIL Apoptosis in Glioblastomas

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- An A20 ligase mediates ubiquitination to inhibit tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis in glioblastoma cells, according to an experimental study published online Jan. 24 in Cancer Discovery.

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Adrenalectomy Rates Remain High in Radical Nephrectomy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- During a recent 10-year period, the rate of ipsilateral adrenalectomy at the time of radical nephrectomy decreased slightly, according to a study published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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BRCA Carriers Have Improved Survival in Ovarian Cancer

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are associated with improved five-year survival, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Reduced [11C]PiB Uptake in Cognitively Active Elderly

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly individuals who keep their brains active through activities such as reading, writing, and playing games have reduced uptake of carbon 11-labeled Pittsburg Compound B ([11C]PiB), according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Perfluorinated Compounds Reduce Immunity in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Increased exposure to perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) is associated with reduced immune response to childhood vaccinations, according to a study published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Cells Safe for Transplant

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Retinal cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be safely transplanted into people and may improve vision in patients with diseases such as macular degeneration, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in The Lancet.

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Negative Social Interactions Linked to Inflammation

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Everyday social interactions that are negative or competitive are associated with elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Fetal Growth Not Linked to Childhood Asthma

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Fetal growth restriction or acceleration is not associated with asthma symptoms in childhood, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Effects of Severe, Childhood Brain Injury Long Lasting

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- There is a high risk of persisting deficits following severe, childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in ~4 Percent of U.K. Troops

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has a prevalence of 4.4 percent in U.K. troops returning from Iraq or Afghanistan, and 9.5 percent in those with a combat role, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation.

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Sleep Disturbance Linked to Cardiometabolic Disease Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep duration and sleep disturbance are associated with cardiometabolic disease, according to a study published online Dec. 12 in the Journal of Sleep Research.

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No Mitotic Difference in Single or Multiple Primary Melanomas

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with single primary melanoma (SPM) and multiple primary melanomas (MPM), there is no significant difference in the presence or absence of mitosis, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Cancer.

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Mild-to-Moderate Asthma Frequently Non-Eosinophilic

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately half of all patients with mild-to-moderate asthma are persistently non-eosinophilic, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Gender, Family, Ambivalence Impact Live Liver Donation

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Gender, relationship to the recipient, and ambivalence toward donation all impact living liver donor's decisions, motives, and post-donation outcomes, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Three New Breast Cancer Susceptibility SNPs Identified

MONDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Three new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) conferring susceptibility to breast cancer have been identified, according to a letter published online Jan. 22 in Nature Genetics.

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First Test Approved to Help Detect Risk of PML

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The first test to help determine the risk of a rare brain infection among users of the drug Tysabri has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Tysabri

Variability in Number of Lymph Nodes After Surgery Probed

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In two pathology departments in different hospitals, significant differences have been seen in the number of lymph nodes found following pelvic lymph node dissection for bladder cancer, according to a study published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Four Novel Biomarkers May Predict Diabetic Kidney Damage

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 1 diabetes, a panel of four novel protein biomarkers may predict early kidney damage, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Diabetes Care.

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Matted Lymph Nodes ID Poor Oropharyngeal SCC Prognosis

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) who present with matted nodes have a worse prognosis than those without matted nodes, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Head & Neck.

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Mutant p53 Disrupts Mammary Acinar Morphology

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Mutant p53 disrupts breast architecture, possibly via upregulation of the mevalonate pathway, according to a study published in the Jan. 20 issue of Cell.

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No Autoimmune Safety Signal for Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For women vaccinated with the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4), there is no evidence of an autoimmune safety signal, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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HIV Risk-Related Behaviors Down in the United States

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The number of men and women who reported engaging in HIV risk-related behaviors was lower in 2006 to 2010 compared with 2002, with the decline likely resulting from a decrease in sexual risk behaviors, according to a research published in the Jan. 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Reports.

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Backscattering Intensity Measure May Help ID CIN Grade

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Use of backscattering intensity measurements in optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is influenced by perceptual and or cognitive bias, according to a study published in the January issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Osteoporotic Fracture Risk High in Systemic Mastocytosis

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- There is a high risk of osteoporotic fractures and osteoporosis in patients with indolent systemic mastocytosis (ISM), according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Allergy.

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Calcium Associated With Lower Risk of Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary calcium intake is inversely associated with prostate cancer risk, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Ability to Predict Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence Limited

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A published nomogram from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) is imperfect for predicting the risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) following excision of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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BRAF + MEK Inhibitor May Help Avoid Cutaneous Carcinomas

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Combining the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib with an MEK inhibitor may help prevent squamous-cell carcinomas in melanoma treatment, according to a study published in the Jan. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Interaction of RNA Binding Proteins ID'd in Glioblastoma

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The RNA-binding protein (RBP) HuR interacts with and regulates Musashi1 (Msi1) post-transcriptionally in glioblastoma cells, according to an experimental study published in the January issue of Molecular Cancer Research.

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Circulating Tumor Cells Predict Small-Cell Lung CA Prognosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and the change in CTC number after one cycle of chemotherapy predict prognosis in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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ROR2 ID'd As Novel Biomarker of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- ROR2 gene mutations are expressed in a subset of soft-tissue sarcomas, including leiomyosarcoma (LMS), gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), and desmoid-type fibromatosis (DTF), and expression may be indicative of poor prognosis, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in The Journal of Pathology.

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Airway Smooth Muscle Layer Has Key Role in Asthma

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Although extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in the airway smooth muscle (ASM) layer is not different for patients with asthma and controls, it is associated with the dynamics of airway function in patients with asthma, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Allergy.

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Low Doses of Insulin Induce an Elastogenic Effect

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin induces an elastogenic effect, with therapeutic doses of insulin stimulating the formation of elastic fibers in human aortic smooth muscle cell cultures, according to an experimental study published online Jan. 11 in The American Journal of Pathology.

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Coffee May Inhibit Human Islet Amyloid Aggregation

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The major components of coffee are able to inhibit the toxic aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), according to a study published in the Dec. 28 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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Maternal Asthma Meds Not Linked to Most Birth Defects

MONDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Use of asthma medications in early pregnancy is not associated with most birth defects, but positive associations are present for a few specific defects, including isolated esophageal and anorectal atresia and omphalocele, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Additional Mutations Identified in Relapse-Specific AML

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Relapse of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with acquisition of new mutations and clonal evolution, according to a letter published online Jan. 11 in Nature.

Letter

Fatal Case of Measles Without Rash Found in Young Woman

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A fatality from measles with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but without rash, has been reported, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Lower Rate of IBD for Women Living in Sunnier Climates

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Living in the southern latitudes is associated with a reduced risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with residence at age 30 most strongly related to the risk, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Gut.

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Impaired White Matter ID'd in Internet Addiction Disorder

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers with internet addiction disorder (IAD) show impaired white matter structure, indicated by reductions in fractional anisotropy (FA), according to a study published online Jan. 11 in PLoS One.

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U.S. Health Care Expenditure Still Unevenly Distributed

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Health care expenditure in the United States is still unevenly distributed, with 1 percent of the population accounting for approximately 20 percent of expenditure in 2008 and 2009, according to a January statistical brief published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Maternal Antidepressants Up Infant Pulmonary Hypertension

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of antidepressants, specifically selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), during pregnancy increases the risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension in newborns, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in BMJ.

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Inflammatory Bowel Disease Increasing in U.S., Europe

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are highest in Europe and North America, and are increasing, according to a review published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Increased CD4+ T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Obese

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Morbidly obese individuals have a selective increase in CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood T-cell compartment, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Diabetes.

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Thromboprophylaxis Rate Low for Knee Arthroplasty in Taiwan

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis for Taiwanese patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is very low, at 2.2 percent, which may correlate with the low incidence of post-surgery venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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PEDF Has Tumor-Suppressive and Neuroprotective Functions

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) rapidly suppresses experimental brain metastases and protects the brain from tumor-induced damage in a mouse model, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of Cancer Research.

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Dark Chocolate Inhibits Platelet Function in Smokers

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In smokers, dark chocolate lowers oxidative stress and has an inhibitory effect on platelet function, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Gene Variant Identified in Families With Cold Urticaria

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The PLCG2 gene, which encodes phospholipase Cγ2, has been found to be associated with a dominantly inherited medical condition causing cold urticaria, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Parabens Seen in Almost All Breast Mastectomy Samples

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- One or more esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) are seen in 99 percent of post-mastectomy, primary breast cancer tissue samples, and their concentrations vary within and between breasts, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in the Journal of Applied Toxicology.

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APOE Status, Exercise Combo Impact Amyloid Deposition

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- For cognitively normal carriers of APOE ε4, a sedentary lifestyle is associated with an increased risk of amyloid deposition, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in the Archives of Neurology.

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CDC: 2010 Saw Decrease in Age-Adjusted Death Rates

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- From 2009 to 2010, age-adjusted death rates decreased and life expectancy increased, according to a Jan. 11 report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Gene Variant Linked to Hereditary Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A mutation in a gene important in prostate development is associated with a higher risk of hereditary prostate cancer, particularly early-onset cancers, according to a study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Hypertension Registry IDs Features of Pediatric HTN

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of data from the Tracking Outcomes and Practice in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension (TOPP) registry has identified clinical features specific to the care of children with pulmonary hypertension, according to research published online Jan. 11 in The Lancet.

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Gestational Hypothyroidism Higher Than Estimated

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in six pregnant women who are tested suffer from gestational hypothyroidism, but less than a quarter of pregnant women undergo screening, according to a study published online Dec. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Occasional Marijuana Use Not Tied to Adverse Lung Function

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Occasional and low cumulative marijuana use does not adversely affect lung function, according to a study published in the Jan. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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No Rise in Intussusception After Rotavirus Shot Revival

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The reintroduction of the rotavirus vaccination in the United States has not resulted in an increase in the rate of infant hospital discharges for intussusception, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Losartan Halts Smoke-Related Lung Damage in Mice

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Losartan, an angiotensin receptor type 1 blocker used to antagonize transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, can prevent cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung damage in a mouse model, according to a study published in the Jan. 3 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Statins Increase Diabetes Risk for Postmenopausal Women

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women taking statin medications have an increased risk of incident diabetes mellitus (DM), according to an analysis published online Jan. 9 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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ROS1 Rearrangements Seen in Small Subset of NSCLC Tumors

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 2 percent of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have rearrangements of the ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase gene, with clinical characteristics similar to those seen in ALK-rearranged NSCLC, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Adiponectin Tied to Dementia, Alzheimer's Risk in Women

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Plasma levels of adiponectin are an independent risk factor for all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in women, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Brain Changes Seen After First-Episode Psychosis in Teens

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Children and adolescents with schizophrenia have significantly greater brain gray matter (GM) volume loss and increased frontal lobe cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume compared with adolescents without a diagnosis of psychosis, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Larger Trabecular Holes Explain Bone Fragility in Diabetes

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The higher fracture risk observed in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may be due, in part, to the larger average hole size and, consequently, the more porous nature of their trabecular bone microarchitecture, according to a study published in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Antiestrogens May Counter Increased Skin Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer patients receiving antiestrogen therapy, there doesn't appear to be an excess risk of secondary cutaneous melanoma, according to a study published in the January issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

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Biomarker Patterns Indicative of Weight Loss Benefits

MONDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Biomarker patterns reflect both the short-term benefits of weight reduction and the long-term cumulative benefits of healthful eating, despite partial weight regain, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in Diabetes Care.

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Hypoglycemia in Intensive Diabetes Control May Up Survival

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with type 2 diabetes, recognized and unrecognized hypoglycemia is more common in those with intensive blood sugar control, and is associated with a small but significant reduction in the risk of mortality, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in Diabetes Care.

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Three Novel Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility Loci Identified

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Three novel multiple sclerosis (MS) genetic susceptibility loci have been identified, according to a meta-analysis published in the December issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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No Mortality Benefit for Annual Prostate Cancer Screening

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- There is no evidence of a mortality benefit for organized annual prostate cancer screening versus usual care, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Poor Sleep Worsens Health in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may have difficulty getting a good night's sleep, resulting in difficulty controlling blood sugar and decreased performance in school, according to a study published in the January issue of SLEEP.

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TACSTD2 Gene May Affect Postnatal Growth, Fat Mass

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Altered expression of the TACSTD2 gene may be associated with postnatal growth and childhood fat mass, although lack of association between postnatal growth or fat mass and a methylation proxy SNP in this gene may indicate confounding, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in Diabetes.

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Shedding Persists in Herpes Even With High-Dose Antivirals

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Short episodes of subclinical shedding or reactivation persist in herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, even in patients on high doses of antiviral therapy, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in The Lancet.

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Potential Genetic Marker of Colorectal Cancer Risk Found

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- There is an association between an increase in the degree of germline allele-specific expression (ASE) of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and the risk of common forms of colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a study published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Cancer Incidence, Mortality Higher in Adults With Diabetes

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of cancer and the mortality rate due to cancer is higher in people with type 2 diabetes compared to those without the condition, according to a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Saffold Virus Found in Spinal Fluid of Two Children

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Saffold virus (SAFV), which can cause serious invasive infection in children, has been identified in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two children in Denmark, according to a viral genotyping study published in the January issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Novel Hepatitis C Vaccine Induces T Cell Responses

THURSDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Adenovirus-based vaccines can generate strong, broad, long-lasting, and functional T cell responses against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in healthy people, according to a study published in the Jan. 4 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Cancer-Related Mortality Continues to Decrease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Overall cancer rates have decreased for men and remained stable for women, but mortality from cancer has declined for both men and women, according to a report from the American Cancer Society published online Jan. 4 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Vaccine Helps Prevent HSV-1 Genital Disease and Infection

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An investigational vaccine effectively prevents herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) but not HSV type 2 (HSV-2) genital disease and infection, according to a study published in the Jan. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Gene Involved in Familial Pancreatic Cancer Identified

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Specific ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mutations that increase the hereditary risk of familial pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma have been identified, according to a study published online Dec. 29 in Cancer Discovery.

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Donor Bisphosphonate Use OK With Demineralized Bone Matrix

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) derived from donors who used bisphosphonates is safe and effective in its ability to induce bone formation, according to a study published in the Dec. 21 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Genetics Play Key Role in Infant Postnatal Weight Gain

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal weight gain in healthy preterm newborns shows a high level of heritability, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

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Cannabis Impacts Brain During Attentional Salience

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The psychotic effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cannabidiol are mediated through distinct modulation of prefrontal, striatal, and hippocampal function during attentional salience processing, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Hormone Receptor Levels Predict Trastuzumab Effect

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced breast cancer whose tumors also express hormone receptors may be less responsive to the addition of trastuzumab to chemotherapy, suggesting that hormone receptor expression has a predictive role in determining response to therapy, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Infarcts, Hippocampal Volume Independently Linked to Memory

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly individuals without dementia, the presence of brain infarcts and a smaller hippocampal volume are independently associated with poor memory, according to a study published in the Jan 3. issue of Neurology.

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GLP-1 Plays Role in Glucose Control After Gastric Bypass

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- There is a positive association between glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations and insulin concentrations following gastric bypass (GBP) surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting a role for GLP-1 in glucose control, according to a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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CDC: Lean Response Ups Lab Surge Capacity During Pandemic

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of Lean methods can improve the surge capacity of a laboratory, according to a study published in the January issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Maternal Diabetes, Low Income Up ADHD Risk in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Children exposed to maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low socioeconomic status (SES), especially in combination, are at an increased risk of developing childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Psych Symptoms Affect Key Subset With Celiac Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial subset of women with celiac disease report clinically relevant symptoms of depression and disordered eating, despite high adherence to a gluten-free diet, according to a study published online in Chronic Illness.

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