Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Gastroenterology | Infections | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

By 2007, Hep C Superseded HIV As Cause of Death in U.S.

Last Updated: February 20, 2012.

 

Second study shows that birth cohort screening for hepatitis C is cost-effective

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) superseded HIV as a cause of death by 2007; and birth cohort screening is cost-effective for HCV, according to two studies published in the Feb. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatitis C virus (HCV) superseded HIV as a cause of death by 2007; and birth cohort screening is cost-effective for HCV, according to two studies published in the Feb. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Kathleen N. Ly, M.P.H., from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and colleagues investigated mortality in the United States from hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HCV, in comparison with HIV. The researchers found that, from 1999 to 2007, there was a significant increase in the number of annual recorded deaths from HCV, to 15,106, and a decrease in HIV deaths, to 12,734. Factors that increased the likelihood of HCV-related deaths included chronic liver disease, HBV or HIV co-infection, alcohol-related conditions, and minority status. Factors linked to HBV-related deaths included chronic liver disease, HCV or HIV co-infection, alcohol-related conditions, and Asian or Pacific Islander descent. The majority of HBV and HCV deaths occurred in middle-aged individuals.

David B. Rein, Ph.D., from the University of Chicago, and colleagues estimated the cost-effectiveness of birth-cohort screening of adults born from 1945 through 1965 for HCV. They found that birth-cohort screening identified 808,580 additional cases of chronic HCV, compared with the status quo, with a screening cost of $2,874 per case identified. Assuming screening was followed by treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, for treated patients, screening increased quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) by 348,800, and costs by $5.5 billion, for an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $15,700 per additional QALY.

"Birth-cohort screening for HCV in primary care settings was cost-effective," Rein and colleagues write.

Abstract - Ly
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Rein
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Substituting Fructose for Other Carbs Doesn't Up Weight Gain Next: Surgical Spinal Cord Monitoring May Predict Paralysis

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.