Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

February 2012 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: March 01, 2012.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for February 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Bisphosphonates, Annual BMD Screen Up Fracture Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In a hypothetical model of postmenopausal women receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors (AIs) for hormone receptor (HR)-positive early breast cancer (EBC), baseline and annual bone mineral density (BMD) screening followed by selective treatment with oral bisphosphonates for those diagnosed with osteoporosis is a cost-effective strategy, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Ruxolitinib Reduces Spleen Size in Myelofibrosis

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with myelofibrosis, treatment with a potent and selective Janus kinase 1 and 2 inhibitor, ruxolitinib, provides significant clinical benefit compared with the best available treatment or placebo, according to two studies published in the March 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Harrison (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text - Verstovsek (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

More Added Sugar Calories Come From Food Than Drink

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Added sugar consumption is highest in non-Hispanic white children and adolescents and comes mainly from food, not beverages, consumed at home, according to a February data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

More Information

Nicotine Patches Don't Help Pregnant Women Stop Smoking

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of nicotine-replacement therapy to behavioral cessation support does not increase the rate of smoking abstinence in pregnant women, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Amantadine Speeds Recovery From Consciousness Disorders

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Amantadine improves the rate of functional recovery during active treatment in patients with severe traumatic brain injury, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Despite Benefits of Selenium, Supplements May Be Harmful

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- While selenium is necessary for good health, levels that are too high can be harmful, and people whose serum selenium levels are already at least 122 µ/L should not take supplements, according to a review published online Feb. 29 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Behavioral Intervention Slims Waistlines of Obese Men

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A behavioral intervention to improve physical activity and diet in obese patients is more effective at slimming the waistlines of men than women, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Group Art Therapy Not Found to Be Helpful in Schizophrenia

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Group art therapy does not improve the mental health or social functioning of patients with schizophrenia, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in BMJ.

Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Hearing Loss Linked to Falls in Those Under Age 70

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss is associated with increased odds of falling, according to research published in the Feb. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Statin Users Less Likely to Suffer From Depression

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with coronary heart disease, use of statins is associated with reduced risk of having or developing depression, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Neurophysiological Deficits Persist Following Concussion

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For athletes who suffer a concussion, neurophysiological deficits persist and are present at least six months following a concussion, and adolescents appear to be more vulnerable to the consequences of concussion, according to a study published in the March issue of Brain Injury.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Family Tree Clarifies Risk of Death Due to Arrhythmia

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In six inherited arrhythmia syndromes, the Family Tree Mortality Ratio (FTMR) method is useful for identifying the age during which mortality risk becomes manifest in an untreated population, according to research published online Feb. 28 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ototoxicity Rates in Children Receiving Carboplatin Studied

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Retinoblastoma patients who are younger than 6 months of age at the start of carboplatin treatment experience a higher incidence of ototoxicity, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Inactivity and Obesity Relate to Cognitive Impairment in Lupus

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physical inactivity and obesity are associated with impaired cognitive function, especially executive functions, in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), according to research published online Feb. 15 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Care Protocol for Comatose Patients May Need Revision

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although neurological tests are highly reliable predictors of death in patients who remain in a coma following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), withdrawal-of-treatment decisions may need to be delayed for those who undergo mild hypothermia therapy, according to a Dutch study published in the February issue of the Annals of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Approves Label Changes for Statins

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The recommendation to remove routine monitoring of liver enzymes is among safety label changes recently approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for statins, according to a Feb. 28 Drug Safety Communication issued by the agency.

More Information

Sleeping Pill Use Linked to Greater Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Even relatively small doses of sleeping pills are associated with a more than three-fold higher risk of death, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in BMJ Open.

Abstract
Full Text

Drug Ups Effect of Gemcitabine in Pancreatic Cancer

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The efficacy of gemcitabine in treating pancreatic cancer can be greatly improved by a second drug that increases gemcitabine levels by preventing its breakdown, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in Cancer Discovery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

BPA Exposure Possibly Linked to Future Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy people exposed to higher levels of the controversial chemical bisphenol A (BPA), found in plastics, may be more likely to develop heart disease, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fast Heart Rate Predictive of Cardiac Events in High-Risk HTN

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A fast heart rate is a strong predictor of adverse cardiac events in patients with high-risk hypertension, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bidirectional Causality for Attention Issues, Video Games

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Children who spend more time playing video games subsequently have more attention problems and impulsivity, and those who are more impulsive or have attention problems spend more time playing video games, according to a study published in the January issue of Psychology of Popular Media Culture.

Full Text

Vitamin D Linked to Reduced Pain in Primary Dysmenorrhea

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with cholecalciferol, which rapidly enhances 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25[OH]D), is associated with decreased pain and reduced nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use for women with primary dysmenorrhea, according to a letter published in the Feb. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Dose-Response Link Between Tanning Bed Use, Skin Cancer

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Use of tanning beds, especially in high school and college, is associated with an increased risk of skin cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text

Adults With Disabilities at Increased Risk of Violence

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with disabilities face an increased risk of violence, with an even higher risk evident for those with mental illness, according to a review published online Feb. 28 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Less Than Half of New Diabetes Patients Achieve A1C Goals

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes achieve A1C <7 percent, and those that do achieve it more likely started with lower A1C levels, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pulsed Dye Laser Effective on Port-Wine Stains in Infants

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Pulsed dye laser (PDL) treatment at two-, three-, and four-week intervals is effective for infants with facial port-wine stains (PWS), with minimal short-term side effects, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rapid Flu Tests Effective for Ruling In (But Not Out) Diagnosis

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Rapid influenza tests are useful for diagnosing influenza; and oral oseltamivir and inhaled zanamivir may be beneficial for the treatment of influenza, according to two reviews published online Feb. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Chartrand
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Hsu
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

A-Fib Increases Risk of Cognitive, Functional Decline

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with atrial fibrillation are at an increased risk for both cognitive and functional decline, regardless of whether they have a stroke, according to research published online Feb. 27 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Cognitive Development Stable for Low Birth Weight Infants

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For very low birth weight (VLBW) babies, there is good stability of cognitive development over time, with a strong correlation between assessments at 2 years of corrected age and at age 5, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Poor Asthma Control Prevalent in the United States

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with asthma who do not use controller medications have persistent disease, and among those patients who do use controller medications, few have well-controlled disease, according to a study published in the March issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Red Blood Cell Omega-3 Levels Linked to Brain Volume

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In adults without clinical dementia, low red blood cell (RBC) levels of omega-3 fatty acids are associated with smaller brain volumes and lower scores on tests of visual memory and executive function, according to a study published in the Feb. 28 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Febrile Children Self-Referred to ER Usually Less Severely Ill

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In 45 percent of self-referred cases, parents properly judge their child's febrile illness as urgent when they bring their child to the emergency department, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Chemo for Breast Cancer Tied to Long-Term Cognitive Issues

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Women treated with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy for breast cancer still experience neuropsychological problems decades later, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text

Low Back Pain Counseling Strategy Ups Return to Work

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Combining a disability evaluation with proactive counseling for workers with low back pain (LBP) results in a higher return-to-work rate, which is statistically significant at one year, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

TAK-875 Improves Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes who do not respond to diet or metformin treatment, selective pharmacological activation of the free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1) by TAK-875 improves glycemic control, according to a phase 2 study published online Feb. 27 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Heartburn Controlled With Step Down to Once Daily Therapy

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients who take twice-daily proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, are able to successfully step down to management of heartburn with a daily dose of dexlansoprazole modified release (MR), according to a study published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Many Obese With CKD Want to Lose Weight

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many overweight patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) want to lose weight and are utilizing weight loss methods that may further kidney damage, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in the International Journal of Obesity.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Multimodal Palliative Approach OK for Advanced Esophageal CA

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with advanced esophageal cancer, use of an individualized, multimodal approach with palliative intention achieves an acceptable mean survival time, with initial use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) offering significantly longer median survival compared to other modalities, according to the results of a single medical center study published online Feb. 14 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Combo of Diabetes, Depression Increases Post-MI Mortality

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Having both diabetes and depression significantly increases the risk of dying in the years following a heart attack, beyond the increased risk from either condition alone, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

AAP Reaffirms Breastfeeding Policy

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding should be considered a basic health issue, rather than a lifestyle choice, and as such, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) reaffirms its recommendations for exclusive breastfeeding for a baby's first six months of life, according to a policy statement published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

AAP Recommends HPV Vaccine for Boys, Too

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) now recommends the routine vaccination of both males and females against human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a policy statement published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Active Video Games May Not Increase Activity in Children

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Receiving active video games does not increase children's physical activity levels compared with receiving inactive video games, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ten-Year CML Survival Estimate of 68 Percent With Imatinib

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic myeloid leukemia that fails to respond to interferon alpha therapy, treatment with imatinib is associated with long-term survival of 68 percent, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Allergy-Related Diseases Affect Majority of Children

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Eczema, asthma, and rhinitis affect more than 50 percent of children up to age 12, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

ASD Meds More Commonly Used by Teens With Comorbid ADHD

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to use psychotropic medication if they also have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published in the Dec. 23 issue of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Variable Mortality Risk for Antipsychotic Use in Elderly

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of mortality associated with antipsychotic drug use among elderly residents in nursing homes in the United States varies between drugs, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in BMJ.

Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Male Pattern Baldness Linked to Prostate Symptoms

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Early-onset of male pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia [AGA]) may be a marker of male urinary symptoms associated with an enlarged prostate, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

UVB Preferred for Treatment of Moderate to Severe Psoriasis

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Ultraviolet B (UVB) is preferred by dermatologists for first-line treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis in both healthy male and female patients, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Oncogenic HPV Rarely Present in Breast Cancer Tissues

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to numerous reports, oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types are rarely present in mammary epithelium of patients with breast cancer, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bolus Calculation, Flexible Insulin Up Diabetes Control

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A structured course teaching the benefits of automated bolus calculator (ABC) use and flexible intensive insulin therapy (FIIT) improves metabolic control and satisfaction in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Complications Seen in 40 Percent of Living Liver Donors

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Complications of living donor hepatic lobectomy occur in 40 percent of cases, with the vast majority resolving within one year, according to research published online Feb. 15 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Timeliness of Diagnosis Varies by Cancer and Patient

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- There is wide variation between cancer types in the proportion of patients who visit their general practitioner three or more times before being referred to the hospital, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Citrus Fruit Linked to Lower Risk of Ischemic Stroke

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Eating higher amounts of a compound (flavonoid) found in citrus fruits may lower the risk of stroke, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Virtual Colonoscopy Useful in Screening Older Adults

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomography (CT) colonography is useful as a primary screening method for detecting colorectal neoplasia in adults over the age of 65 years, with sensitivity and specificity similar to that seen for younger adults, according to research published online Feb. 23 in Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Assay, Algorithm Promising for Detection of Trisomies 21, 18

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A novel biochemical assay (Digital Analysis of Selected Regions [DANSR]) combined with an algorithm (Fetal-fraction Optimized Risk of Trisomy Evaluation [FORTE]) accurately identifies the risk of fetal trisomy 21 and 18 from maternal-blood cell-free DNA (cfDNA), according to two studies published online Jan. 27 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract - Sparks
Full Text
Abstract - Ashoor
Full Text

Prevalence of Screening for Lynch Syndrome Varies

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for Lynch syndrome, the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer, after a colorectal cancer diagnosis is common at comprehensive cancer centers but not community hospitals, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

WHO Criteria May Overestimate Fatality Rate for Avian Flu

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Based on cases in hospitalized patients confirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO), the current estimated overall case fatality rate for H5N1 infection in humans is greater than 50 percent, but the stringent criteria for confirmation of the infection mean the actual fatality rate may be much lower, according to a meta-analysis published online Feb. 23 in Science.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Family History Ups Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Family history of thyroid cancer in a first-degree relative may be associated with an increased risk of sporadic differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), according to a study published in the March 1 issue of Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implantation Ups Life Quality

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Significant improvements in disease-related quality-of-life (QoL) measures are seen over time following the sequential placement of bilateral cochlear implants (BiCIs) in children with prelingual deafness, according to research published in the February issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Stability Predicts Treatment Success for Vitiligo

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with vitiligo, a depigmenting disorder characterized by loss of melanocytes from the epidermis, melanocyte transplantation is more likely to be successful in patients whose disease has been stable for longer periods, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Aspirin and Clopidogrel Improve Claudication Distance

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable intermittent claudication due to peripheral arterial disease, low-dose aspirin appears to work as well as clopidogrel when given in conjunction with walking rehabilitation to improve initial claudication distance (ICD) and absolute claudication distance (ACD), according to research published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease.

Abstract
Full Text

Bisphosphonate Use Linked to Reduced Colorectal Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to bisphosphonates (BPs) is associated with a reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), a reduction that is significant only for risedronic acid, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cancer Risk Up in Bilateral Retinoblastoma Survivors

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For survivors of bilateral retinoblastoma (Rb), family history is associated with an increased risk of second cancers (SCs), especially melanoma, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pseudo-Prospective Analyses ID Alcohol Recovery Correlates

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prospective analysis of correlates of alcohol recovery compare favorably with pseudo-prospective studies with time-dependent covariates, but differ from cross-sectional analyses, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Neuro-Psych Functioning for Long-Term Glioma Survivors

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term survivors of childhood high-grade glioma have intellectual functioning within low-average ranges and low neuropsychological functioning, but the majority of patients report within or above normal quality of life, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cognitive Rehabilitation Improves Brain Function in MS

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrates that patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) multiple sclerosis (MS) who respond to 12 weeks of computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation with improved attention, information processing, and executive functions have modified brain activity, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Community Health Indicators Tied to Transplant Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In the community setting, health indicators are significantly associated with post-kidney-transplant mortality, according to a study published online Feb 20 in the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Mammography-Detected Breast CA Rates Increasing Over Time

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- From 1990 to 2008 there was a significant increase in mammography-detected breast cancer, which coincided with lower-stage disease detection, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Colonoscopic Removal of Adenomas Cuts CRC Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Colonoscopic removal of adenomatous polyps reduces colorectal cancer mortality, and interim analysis shows that fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) yields similar results to colonoscopy; however, more polyps are identified with colonoscopy screening compared to FIT, according to two studies published in the Feb. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Zauber (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text - Quintero (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Following Exercise Guidelines Is Safe During Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The safety of exercise during pregnancy according to existing public health guidelines has been reaffirmed for both mothers and their fetuses, according to research published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full Text

Skin Cancer Frequency in Chronic Leg Ulcers >10 Percent

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic leg ulcers (CLUs) that don't heal after three months of appropriate treatment have an overall skin cancer frequency of 10.4 percent, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Abortive Acupuncture Reduces Allergen-Induced Itch

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture and cetirizine both reduce type I hypersensitivity itch better than placebo or no intervention, according to an article published online Feb. 8 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Elevated Homocysteine, Heart Disease Link Questioned

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated homocysteine levels are not associated with a greater risk of coronary heart disease when considering unpublished data, suggesting publication bias, according to a study available online Feb. 21 in PLoS Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Endometriosis Linked to Higher Ovarian Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A history of endometriosis increases the risk of developing ovarian cancer, although the increased risk is restricted to specific subtypes of invasive ovarian cancer, according to a meta-analysis published online Feb. 22 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Teenage Drinking Influenced by Media Exposure to Alcohol

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Media exposure, including viewing films featuring alcohol and alcohol-related merchandise, influence both onset age of teenage alcohol consumption and binge drinking, whereas family drinking characteristics influence only onset age of alcohol consumption, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in BMJ Open.

Abstract
Full Text

Study IDs the Rationalizations of Social Smokers

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Social smokers do not see themselves as addicted smokers and often smoke in response to group norms or because of excessive alcohol consumption, according to research published online Feb. 20 in Tobacco Control.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

C-Peptide Still Produced After Decades of Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients who have had type 1 diabetes for decades can still produce C-peptide and respond to hyperglycemia, suggesting residual β-cell function, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Highest Diabetes Death Rates Seen in Trials Selecting for CKD

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In type 2 diabetes patients selected for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with the highest overall risk of mortality, according to a review published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medtronic Stent Approved to Treat Coronary Artery Disease

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Medtronic's Resolute Integrity Drug-Eluting Stent (DES) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for people with coronary artery disease (CAD), the Minneapolis-based company said in a news release.

coronary artery disease

Women With MI More Likely to Present Without Chest Pain

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Women suffering a myocardial infarction (MI) are more likely than men of the same age to present without chest pain and have higher in-hospital mortality, according to a study published in the Feb. 22 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Replacing PPSV23 With PCV13 May Prevent More Pneumonia

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A model shows that replacing the current 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) might prevent more pneumococcal disease, while remaining economically reasonable, according to a study published in the Feb. 22 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Small Risk of Febrile Seizures With DTaP-IPV-Hib Vaccine

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The combined diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenza type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib) vaccine is associated with a small increased risk of febrile seizures on the day of the first and second vaccinations, according to a study published in the Feb. 22 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Maternal Flu Vaccine Improves Health of Unborn Child

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinating pregnant women against the influenza virus appears to have a significant positive effect on infant birth weight, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Insulin Acts As Satiety Signal in Postprandial Period

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Brain insulin may act as a satiety signal during the postprandial period and is associated with decreased appetite and reduced intake of highly palatable food, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Diabetes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Transplanted Leg Hair Can Soften Hairline Appearance

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Transplantation of leg hair follicles can soften the appearance of the hairline in patients receiving hair transplants, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Resistance Training Improves Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, aerobic training and resistance training both result in improved metabolic features, insulin sensitivity, and reduced abdominal fat, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Plastic Surgery Gives Younger Appearance to Aging Face

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Aesthetic facial plastic surgery results in a reduction in perceived age, with the effect more substantial for those who undergo multiple procedures, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text

Pharmacist-Led Intervention Reduces Medical Errors

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For clinics with computerized medical records, a pharmacist-led intervention significantly reduces the risk of medical errors and is likely to be cost-effective, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Review Looks at Comparative Effects of Antipsychotics in Youth

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- There is limited evidence for the comparative benefits and harms of antipsychotics in children and young adults, according to a review published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Dermatologist Density Linked to Melanoma Mortality Rates

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma mortality rates are significantly lower in U.S. counties with 0.001 to 2.0 dermatologists per 100,000 people, compared to those with no dermatologist, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol Dependence Significant Problem for U.S. Surgeons

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable number of U.S. surgeons have alcohol abuse and dependence, which is more likely in those who have recently reported major errors, are burned out, and are depressed, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Substituting Fructose for Other Carbs Doesn't Up Weight Gain

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence suggests that fructose is unlikely to cause weight gain when substituted for other carbohydrates in diets with similar numbers of calories, but does increase weight gain in hypercaloric diets, according to a review published in the Feb. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

By 2007, Hep C Superseded HIV As Cause of Death in U.S.

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatitis C virus (HCV) superseded HIV as a cause of death by 2007; and birth cohort screening is cost-effective for HCV, according to two studies published in the Feb. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Ly
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Rein
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Infectious Disease Burden Rising in New Zealand

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital admissions for infectious disease have risen over the last two decades in New Zealand, with infectious disease now being the biggest contributor to hospital admissions of any cause, particularly among the native population and the socioeconomically disadvantaged, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: February 2012 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology Next: February 2012 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.