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February 2012 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: March 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for February 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

More Added Sugar Calories Come From Food Than Drink

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Added sugar consumption is highest in non-Hispanic white children and adolescents and comes mainly from food, not beverages, consumed at home, according to a February data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Ototoxicity Rates in Children Receiving Carboplatin Studied

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Retinoblastoma patients who are younger than 6 months of age at the start of carboplatin treatment experience a higher incidence of ototoxicity, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Neurophysiological Deficits Persist Following Concussion

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For athletes who suffer a concussion, neurophysiological deficits persist and are present at least six months following a concussion, and adolescents appear to be more vulnerable to the consequences of concussion, according to a study published in the March issue of Brain Injury.

Abstract
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Care Protocol for Comatose Patients May Need Revision

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although neurological tests are highly reliable predictors of death in patients who remain in a coma following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), withdrawal-of-treatment decisions may need to be delayed for those who undergo mild hypothermia therapy, according to a Dutch study published in the February issue of the Annals of Neurology.

Abstract
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Dose-Response Link Between Tanning Bed Use, Skin Cancer

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Use of tanning beds, especially in high school and college, is associated with an increased risk of skin cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Adults With Disabilities at Increased Risk of Violence

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with disabilities face an increased risk of violence, with an even higher risk evident for those with mental illness, according to a review published online Feb. 28 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Bidirectional Causality for Attention Issues, Video Games

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Children who spend more time playing video games subsequently have more attention problems and impulsivity, and those who are more impulsive or have attention problems spend more time playing video games, according to a study published in the January issue of Psychology of Popular Media Culture.

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Cognitive Development Stable for Low Birth Weight Infants

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For very low birth weight (VLBW) babies, there is good stability of cognitive development over time, with a strong correlation between assessments at 2 years of corrected age and at age 5, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Pulsed Dye Laser Effective on Port-Wine Stains in Infants

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Pulsed dye laser (PDL) treatment at two-, three-, and four-week intervals is effective for infants with facial port-wine stains (PWS), with minimal short-term side effects, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Rapid Flu Tests Effective for Ruling In (But Not Out) Diagnosis

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Rapid influenza tests are useful for diagnosing influenza; and oral oseltamivir and inhaled zanamivir may be beneficial for the treatment of influenza, according to two reviews published online Feb. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Chartrand
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Abstract - Hsu
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Poor Asthma Control Prevalent in the United States

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with asthma who do not use controller medications have persistent disease, and among those patients who do use controller medications, few have well-controlled disease, according to a study published in the March issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Abstract
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Febrile Children Self-Referred to ER Usually Less Severely Ill

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In 45 percent of self-referred cases, parents properly judge their child's febrile illness as urgent when they bring their child to the emergency department, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Active Video Games May Not Increase Activity in Children

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Receiving active video games does not increase children's physical activity levels compared with receiving inactive video games, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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AAP Reaffirms Breastfeeding Policy

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding should be considered a basic health issue, rather than a lifestyle choice, and as such, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) reaffirms its recommendations for exclusive breastfeeding for a baby's first six months of life, according to a policy statement published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

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AAP Recommends HPV Vaccine for Boys, Too

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) now recommends the routine vaccination of both males and females against human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a policy statement published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Children Now Eligible for Screening Test for Bacterium

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded approval for a breath test that screens for a common ulcer-causing germ, to include children aged 3 years to 17.

CDC

Allergy-Related Diseases Affect Majority of Children

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Eczema, asthma, and rhinitis affect more than 50 percent of children up to age 12, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Allergy.

Abstract
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ASD Meds More Commonly Used by Teens With Comorbid ADHD

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to use psychotropic medication if they also have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published in the Dec. 23 issue of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

Abstract
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Assay, Algorithm Promising for Detection of Trisomies 21, 18

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A novel biochemical assay (Digital Analysis of Selected Regions [DANSR]) combined with an algorithm (Fetal-fraction Optimized Risk of Trisomy Evaluation [FORTE]) accurately identifies the risk of fetal trisomy 21 and 18 from maternal-blood cell-free DNA (cfDNA), according to two studies published online Jan. 27 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract - Sparks
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Abstract - Ashoor
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Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implantation Ups Life Quality

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Significant improvements in disease-related quality-of-life (QoL) measures are seen over time following the sequential placement of bilateral cochlear implants (BiCIs) in children with prelingual deafness, according to research published in the February issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Cancer Risk Up in Bilateral Retinoblastoma Survivors

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For survivors of bilateral retinoblastoma (Rb), family history is associated with an increased risk of second cancers (SCs), especially melanoma, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Low Neuro-Psych Functioning for Long-Term Glioma Survivors

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term survivors of childhood high-grade glioma have intellectual functioning within low-average ranges and low neuropsychological functioning, but the majority of patients report within or above normal quality of life, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Defibrotide Prophylaxis Cuts Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients undergoing hemopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT), defibrotide prophylaxis may reduce the incidence of hepatic veno-occlusive disease, according to the results of a phase 3 open-label randomized controlled study published online Feb. 23 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study IDs the Rationalizations of Social Smokers

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Social smokers do not see themselves as addicted smokers and often smoke in response to group norms or because of excessive alcohol consumption, according to research published online Feb. 20 in Tobacco Control.

Abstract
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Teenage Drinking Influenced by Media Exposure to Alcohol

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Media exposure, including viewing films featuring alcohol and alcohol-related merchandise, influence both onset age of teenage alcohol consumption and binge drinking, whereas family drinking characteristics influence only onset age of alcohol consumption, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in BMJ Open.

Abstract
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Small Risk of Febrile Seizures With DTaP-IPV-Hib Vaccine

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The combined diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenza type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib) vaccine is associated with a small increased risk of febrile seizures on the day of the first and second vaccinations, according to a study published in the Feb. 22 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Maternal Flu Vaccine Improves Health of Unborn Child

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinating pregnant women against the influenza virus appears to have a significant positive effect on infant birth weight, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
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MRSA Screening Protocol Aids in Peds Open Airway Surgery

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A screening and antibiotic treatment regimen for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in children undergoing open airway surgery may be helpful for minimizing MRSA-associated postoperative infections in MRSA-colonized patients, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Alcohol Dependence Significant Problem for U.S. Surgeons

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable number of U.S. surgeons have alcohol abuse and dependence, which is more likely in those who have recently reported major errors, are burned out, and are depressed, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Review Looks at Comparative Effects of Antipsychotics in Youth

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- There is limited evidence for the comparative benefits and harms of antipsychotics in children and young adults, according to a review published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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White Matter Changes Precede Manifestations of Autism

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The development of white matter pathways is abnormal in infants before manifestations of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), according to a study published online Feb. 17 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Psychiatric History Common in Gender Identity Disorder

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Young patients presenting with gender identity disorder often have significant psychiatric history; and youth in the top decile of gender nonconformity have elevated exposure to abuse, according to two studies published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Spack
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Abstract - Roberts
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Nicotine Replacement Therapy Linked With Infantile Colic

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal smoking or use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of infantile colic in offspring, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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X-Chromosome Gene Variant Linked to SIDS in Boys

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A gene variant on the X-chromosome is associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) only in boys, particularly those who die at the ages of highest SIDS prevalence, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Autism Spectrum Disorders Linked to Motor Impairment

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Motor skills are impaired in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and this impairment correlates with autistic severity and IQ, according to a study published online in Autism.

Abstract
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Infants Comprehend Some Words As Early As 6 Months

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Infants already know the meanings of several common words at 6 months of age, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
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Inactivating Mutation in KISS1 Prevents Pubertal Progression

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An inactivating mutation has been identified in the KISS1 gene in a consanguineous family, a mutation that results in failure of pubertal progression, according to a report published in the Feb. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Topical Corticosteroids Impair Restoration of Skin Barrier

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Topical corticosteroids offer a more potent anti-inflammatory effect for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), but they may impair the restoration of the skin barrier and can induce skin atrophy, making topical calcineurin inhibitors more suitable for long-term treatment of the disease, according to a study published in the March issue of Allergy.

Abstract
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New Data Published on Safety of Leflunomide in Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- New data on birth outcomes provide some reassurance to women who are inadvertently exposed to leflunomide before or during pregnancy, according to research published online Feb. 3 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
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Active Time Improves Youth Cardiometabolic Measures

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The more time children spend engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), the better their cardiometabolic risk factors, including measures of cholesterol, blood pressure, and waist size, regardless of the amount of time spent sedentary, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Home O2 Reduces Hospital Admits in Pediatric Bronchiolitis

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Home oxygen (O2) is a safe and effective way to decrease hospital admissions in select pediatric patients with bronchiolitis, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Four-Factor Model Predicts Post-Heart Transplant Mortality

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A risk-prediction tool using four factors at the time of transplant can help predict post-transplant mortality for children undergoing heart transplantation, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
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Prenatal Vitamin D Deficit Linked to Language Impairment

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal vitamin D insufficiency during pregnancy is linked to subsequent language impairment in offspring, according to a study published Feb. 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Recommended Exceeds Actual Sleep Duration for Children

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Historical trends suggest that children's recommended and actual sleep durations are decreasing over time, with recommended sleep duration consistently greater than actual sleep duration, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Cancer Risk Higher in Children With Juvenile Arthritis

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are significantly more likely to develop cancer than children without the condition, although common treatments have no effect on risk, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Insulin Defects Seen in Obese Teens With Normal Blood Glucose

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Obese teenagers in the upper range of normal glucose tolerance exhibit impairments in insulin sensitivity and secretion associated with development of impaired glucose tolerance, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in Diabetes.

Abstract
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No Increase in Pediatric ER CT Scan Use from 2003 to 2010

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- From 2003 to 2010, there was no overall increase in computed tomography (CT) scan utilization in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs), and decreased trends for CT use are being seen when alternative nonradiation-based modalities are available, according to a study published Feb. 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Prenatal Stress May Affect Infant Immune System

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A woman's prenatal exposure to high stress and dust mite allergens may interact to affect the immune system of her offspring, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Allergy.

Abstract
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Vitamin D Not Linked to Insulin Sensitivity in Teens

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D concentrations have no independent association with insulin sensitivity or β-cell function in black and white youth, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Baby-Led Weaning Linked to Healthy Food Preferences

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Baby-led weaning though the use of finger foods, rather than continued spoon-feeding, promotes healthy food preferences in early childhood, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in BMJ Open.

Abstract
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Brain Changes ID'd in Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- By late adolescence and early adulthood, brain volume and T2 relaxation time, a measure of tissue health, has declined in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with similarly-aged healthy peers, according to research published online Feb. 1 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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No Long-Term Impairment From Prenatal Exposure to Chemo

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- General health outcomes and central nervous system, cardiac, and auditory morbidity are not affected by fetal exposure to chemotherapy over the long term, although premature infants exposed to chemotherapy in utero experience impaired cognitive development, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk Factors Identified for Post NICU-Discharge Mortality

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Premature babies with extremely low birth weight (ELBW) are at increased risk of dying following discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) if they are African-American, lack health insurance, or had a long stay in the NICU, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Two-Way Flow of Data Best for Electronic Records, IIS

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Incentive payments to health care providers to encourage adoption of the electronic health record (EHR), instituted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), should encourage bidirectional sharing of information between EHR systems and state or regional immunization information systems (IIS), according to research published online Feb. 7 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Prescription Shampoo Approved to Treat Head Lice

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Sklice Lotion, a prescription-strength shampoo to treat head lice, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for people 6 months and older, the French product maker Sanofi said.

head lice

Chlorhexidine to Umbilical Cord Stump Reduces Newborn Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Cleaning the umbilical cord with chlorhexidine after birth significantly reduces newborn mortality and infection in rural Bangladesh and Pakistan, according to two studies published online Feb. 8 in The Lancet.

Abstract - El Arifeen
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Abstract - Soofi
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Multicomponent Serogroup B Meningitis Shot Immunogenic

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The multicomponent serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) vaccine (4CMenB) is safe and immunogenic for infants when given alone or together with routine vaccinations, according to research published in the Feb. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

No Increase in Intussusception After RV5 Rotavirus Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of intussusception is not increased in infants aged 4 to 34 weeks who receive the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) compared with infants who do not receive the vaccine, according to research published in the Feb. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Casts for Fractures Linked to Development of Osteopenia

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- For adolescents with leg or ankle fractures, wearing a cast results in loss of bone mineral density in the hip or lower limb, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Editorial

Teen Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in Cars Declines

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in cars has significantly declined among middle school and high school students over the last decade, but approximately a quarter of nonsmoking students are still exposed, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Fluoxetine, Venlafaxine Tied to Drop in Adult Suicide Behaviors

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with the antidepressants fluoxetine hydrochloride and venlafaxine hydrochloride is associated with a reduction in suicidal thoughts and behavior in adult and geriatric patients and has no impact on such thoughts or behavior in youths, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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More Than 4,500 Children Hospitalized for Abuse in 2006

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- More than 4,500 children were hospitalized due to serious physical abuse in 2006, and 300 of these children died in the hospital due to physical abuse, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Massage Reduces Inflammation Following Hard Exercise

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Massage therapy following strenuous exercise reduces inflammation and promotes the growth of new mitochondria in skeletal muscle, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Abstract
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Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Are Resilient

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric patients undergoing stem cell transplantation (SCT) have a positive overall adjustment and health-related quality of life (HRQL), according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Social Exclusion Impacts Child Physical Activity Behaviors

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For children, simulated ostracism is associated with reduced participation in physical activity, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Many Self-Harming Youth Get Inadequate Mental Health Care

FRIDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Many adolescents who are treated in emergency departments for deliberately harming themselves do not receive adequate mental health assessments or follow-up community care, according to research published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Global Malaria Deaths Higher Than Previously Thought

FRIDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Malaria kills more people each year than previously recognized -- nearly 1.2 million people worldwide -- with more than 40 percent of deaths occurring in older children and adults, according to research published in the Feb. 4 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial

Increased ADHD Rates in Children Exposed to Anesthesia

FRIDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated exposure to general anesthesia before age 2 years is associated with increased risk for later development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published in the February issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Abstract
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Geographic Pattern of Lyme Disease Mapped in Eastern U.S.

THURSDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Two Lyme disease risk foci have been identified in the Northeast and upper Midwest of the United States, according to a study published in the February issue of The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

Abstract
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No Improvement in C-Peptide Levels With GAD-Alum

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Treating children with type 1 diabetes with the 65-kD isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) formulated with alum (GAD-alum) does not significantly change levels of stimulated serum C-peptide during 15 months of follow-up, according to a study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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AAP: Childhood Vaccination Schedules Approved for 2012

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The 2012 recommended childhood and adolescent vaccination schedules have been approved, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

Policy Statement

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