Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Cardiology | Internal Medicine | Nephrology | Nursing | Pathology | Surgery | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Biomarkers Gauge Kidney Injury After Heart Surgery

Last Updated: March 02, 2012.

 

Three biomarkers significantly improve risk classification for acute kidney injury progression

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Measuring biomarkers found in blood and urine after heart surgery can help predict which patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) will experience AKI progression, according to a study published online March 1 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Measuring biomarkers found in blood and urine after heart surgery can help predict which patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) will experience AKI progression, according to a study published online March 1 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Jay L. Koyner, M.D., of the University of Chicago, and colleagues used samples from 380 patients from the Translational Research Investigating Biomarker Endpoints in AKI study to evaluate whether kidney injury biomarkers measured at the time of first clinical diagnosis can predict AKI severity. Biomarkers included urinary interleukin (IL)-18, urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR), and urinary and plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL). Each measurement was taken on the day of AKI diagnosis in patients who developed at least AKI Network (AKIN) stage 1 AKI. AKI progression was defined by worsening AKIN stage.

The researchers found that AKI progression occurred in 45 patients (11.8 percent). After adjusting for other clinical predictors, the highest quintiles of the three biomarkers remained associated with AKI progression compared with biomarker values in the lowest two quintiles: IL-18 (odds ratio [OR], 3.0), ACR (OR, 3.4), and plasma NGAL (OR, 7.7). Compared with the clinical model alone, each biomarker significantly improved risk classification, with the best performance seen for plasma NGAL (category-free net reclassification improvement of 0.69).

"Biomarkers measured on the day of AKI diagnosis improve risk stratification and identify patients at higher risk for progression of AKI and worse patient outcomes," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies and/or are listed as co-inventors on the IL-18 and NGAL patents.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Gestational Diabetes, Obesity Impact Pregnancy Outcomes Next: Bariatric Surgery Risks Up in Patients With Kidney Disease

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.