Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Gastroenterology | Internal Medicine | Nephrology | Oncology | Pathology | Surgery | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Use of Stem Cells, Conditioning Induces Immune Tolerance

Last Updated: March 08, 2012.

 

Approach safe for inducing durable chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in kidney recipients

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
A novel approach using a bioengineered mobilized cellular product enriched with hematopoietic stem cells and tolerogenic graft facilitating cells in combination with nonmyeloablative conditioning is safe and practical for inducing immune tolerance after transplantation, according to a study published in the March 7 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- A novel approach using a bioengineered mobilized cellular product enriched with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and tolerogenic graft facilitating cells (FCs) in combination with nonmyeloablative conditioning is safe and practical for inducing immune tolerance after transplantation, according to a study published in the March 7 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Joseph Leventhal, M.D., from Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, and colleagues tested an approach to induce immune tolerance in eight individuals, aged 29 to 56 years, receiving human leukocyte antigen-mismatched kidneys and FC/HSC transplants, who underwent conditioning with fludarabine, total body irradiation, and cyclophosphamide. After transplantation, tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil were used for immunosuppression.

The researchers found that, about one week following transplantation, the absolute neutrophil counts reached a nadir, with recovery by two weeks. At one month, multilineage chimerism ranged from 6 to 100 percent. There was good tolerance of the conditioning, with outpatient management after day two post-surgery. Low-dose tacrolimus monotherapy was given to two patients who exhibited transient chimerism. Two months after transplant, one individual developed viral sepsis and experienced renal artery thrombosis. Durable chimerism, immunocompetence, and donor-specific tolerance were experienced by five subjects, who were successfully weaned off all immunosuppression at one year post-transplant. Anti-donor antibodies were not produced by any of the recipients, nor did any recipient exhibit engraftment syndrome or graft-versus-host-disease.

"These results suggest that manipulation of a mobilized stem cell graft and nonmyeloablative conditioning represents a safe, practical, and reproducible means of inducing durable chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in solid organ transplant recipients," the authors write.

Several of the authors disclosed financial ties to Regenerex and/or are authors on a patent pertaining to the study.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Scottish Smoke-Free Law Cuts Poor Neonatal Outcomes Next: Four or More PMDD Symptoms Linked With Impairment

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.