Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Nursing | ENT | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Communication Can Ease Mental Health Burden of Deaf

Last Updated: March 16, 2012.

 

Use of medically skilled interpreters, health care providers who can sign, improves care

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
There is a high prevalence of mental health problems among deaf individuals, with access to care compounded by communication difficulties, according to a review published in the March 17 issue of The Lancet.

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- There is a high prevalence of mental health problems among deaf individuals, with access to care compounded by communication difficulties, according to a review published in the March 17 issue of The Lancet.

Johannes Fellinger, M.D., from the Hospital of St. John of God in Linz, Austria, and colleagues reviewed the literature to describe individuals with severe-to-profound deafness and their burden of common mental health disorders and barriers to health care.

The researchers report that, although there is a high prevalence of mental health problems among deaf adults, and two times higher rates of emotional and behavioral problems in deaf children, there is no association between the degree of hearing loss and mental health. Among deaf children, constrained language development contributes to behavioral problems and mental health disorders, emphasizing the importance of communication for psychosocial well-being. Published work suggests that deaf people do not have specific psychopathology, but rather suffer from common mental health disorders. Mental distress is worse in individuals reporting communication difficulties. Deaf patients often fear, mistrust, and report frustration with health care settings; enhanced communication via provision of medically skilled interpreters and health care providers who know sign language results in improved compliance with medical recommendations.

"Improved access to health and mental health care can be achieved by provision of specialist services with professionals trained to directly communicate with deaf people and with sign-language interpreters," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Study Looks at Effect of Emotions on Pain and Itch Intensity Next: Gene Profile Correlates With Glycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.