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ESC: Depression Ups Mortality Risk in Years After PCI

Last Updated: March 21, 2012.

 

Seven years after stent placement, depressed patients significantly more likely to have died

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Depression increases the risk of death in the years following treatment with percutaneous coronary intervention, according to a study presented at the European Society of Cardiology's annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing, held from March 16 to 17 in Copenhagen, Denmark.

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Depression increases the risk of death in the years following treatment with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a study presented at the European Society of Cardiology's annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing, held from March 16 to 17 in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Nikki Damen, of Tilburg University in the Netherlands, and colleagues investigated the impact of depression on mortality using data from 1,234 PCI patients aged 26 to 90 years (average age, 62 years) from the Rapamycin-Eluting Stent Evaluated At Rotterdam Cardiology Hospital registry. Six months after stent implantation, participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale to assess depression. All-cause mortality was the study end point.

The researchers found that the prevalence of depression was 26.3 percent. During the study period there were 187 deaths (15.2 percent). The incidence of all-cause mortality was higher in depressed patients than non-depressed patients (23.5 versus 12.2 percent). Adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical factors, anxiety, and the Type D personality, depression was independently associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 1.56). Male gender, older age, and diabetes mellitus were also significantly associated with an increased mortality risk, while statins correlated with a decreased risk. Neither anxiety nor Type D personality had a significant effect on all-cause mortality.

"Doctors and nurses have traditionally focused on medical factors like diabetes or family history of cardiovascular disease when assessing PCI patients' risk of death, but that's not the whole picture," Damen said in a statement. "Psychological factors do matter as well, in combination with the medical factors."

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