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Category: Gynecology | Monthly Briefing

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March 2012 Briefing - OBGYN & Women’s Health

Last Updated: April 02, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for March 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Room for Improvement in Ob-Gyn Communication About Sex

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- About two-thirds of obstetrician/gynecologists (Ob-Gyns) ask patients about their sexual activities, but other aspects of sexuality, including satisfaction with sex and sexual identity, are not routinely discussed, according to a study published online March 22 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Maternal and Child Health Inequalities Found Worldwide

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- As part of Countdown to 2015, substantial variation has been identified between countries and interventions with respect to coverage levels of maternal, neonatal, and child health interventions, according to a study published in the March 31 issue of The Lancet.

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Adherence to Cancer Surveillance Guidelines Varies

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Insured breast cancer survivors have high rates of guideline-recommended recurrence testing and non-recommended metastatic testing, while only about half of colorectal cancer survivors undergo recommended surveillance and two-thirds receive non-recommended metastatic testing, according to a study published online March 20 in Cancer.

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Polymorphism in Opioid Gene Affects Breast Cancer Survival

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Genotype at the A118G polymorphism of the µ-opioid receptor gene is associated with breast cancer-specific mortality, according to a study published in the April issue of Anesthesiology.

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High Fruit Consumption Not Linked to Gestational Diabetes

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Higher consumption of whole fruits prior to pregnancy is not associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and the association between fruit juice consumption and GDM appears to be nonlinear, according to a study published online March 23 in Diabetes Care.

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Chemo-Linked Factors May Impact Weight in Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer can induce weight gain and a variety of metabolic changes that may be associated with a poor prognosis for some patients, according to research published in the April issue of Obesity Reviews.

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National Survey Describes Cancer-Related Deaths in India

WEDNESDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Most cancer-related deaths in India occur in those aged 30 to 69 years, with tobacco-related cancers accounting for a considerable proportion of cancer-related deaths, according to a study published online March 28 in The Lancet.

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Vaccine Cuts Risk of Subsequent HPV-Related Disease

WEDNESDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women surgically treated for human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease who were previously vaccinated with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine have reduced incidence of subsequent HPV-related disease, according to a study published online March 27 in BMJ.

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Chocolate Consumption Tied to Lower Body Mass Index

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- More frequent chocolate intake is linked to a lower body mass index (BMI), according to a research letter published in the March 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Review Compares Drug Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Tricyclic antidepressants and alosetron are associated with significant harm in treating irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) compared with rifaximin, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and lubiprostone appear to be safe, according to a meta-analysis published in the April issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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Prolonged Sitting Increases All-Cause Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- People over the age of 45 years who sit for prolonged periods of time each day are at an increased risk of death due to all causes, compared with those who sit for less than four hours/day, according to research published in the March 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Few Young Women With Cancer Pursue Fertility Preservation

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Few women with cancer diagnosed before age 40 take steps to preserve their fertility during treatment, according to a study published online March 26 in Cancer.

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Confusion About Emergency Contraception Access Common

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- While most pharmacies report having emergency contraception (EC) in stock, misinformation regarding what age women can take it without a prescription is common, according to a study published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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Cervical Cancer Mortality Similar in U.S. and Netherlands

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- The cervical cancer screening program used by the Netherlands is as effective as the screening protocol used in the United States, producing similar cervical cancer mortality rates in spite of less screening, according to research published in the March issue of the Milbank Quarterly.

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More Variation in SIDS Risk Factors in Back-to-Sleep Era

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Following initiation of the Back-to-Sleep (BTS) campaign in 1994, there have been variations in the risk profile of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a study published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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Simple, Realistic Diet and Exercise Guidelines Needed

FRIDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Consumers need to be provided with simple, clearly written, realistic, and tailored guidelines for healthy eating, physical activity, and weight-related recommendations, according to research published online March 8 in Obesity Reviews.

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Prenatal Exposure to Smog Tied to Child Behavior Problems

FRIDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to high levels of airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is associated with adverse outcomes on child behavior, according to research published online March 22 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Antidepressant Use Linked to Pregnancy-Induced HTN

THURSDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Antidepressant use during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, according to a study published online March 21 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Health Care Team Members Key for Antimicrobial Stewardship

THURSDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) that use health care epidemiologists (HEs) and infection preventionists (IPs) have a crucial role to play in the effort to combat health care-associated infections (HAIs), including those caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), according to the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America position paper published in the March issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Weight Gain Linked to Hot Flashes After Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Early-stage breast cancer survivors who gain at least 10 percent of their pre-diagnosis weight are significantly more likely to report hot flashes than those who remain weight stable, according to a study published online March 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Vitamin E Does Not Reduce Risk of Heart Failure in Women

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- In a population of healthy women, long-term treatment with vitamin E is not associated with the risk of developing heart failure, according to a study published in the March issue of Circulation: Heart Failure.

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Survey Describes Docs' Online Professionalism Violations

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Most medical licensing authorities receive and act upon reports of physicians' online professionalism violations, according to a research letter published in the March 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Antimicrobial Stewardship Saves Millions of Dollars

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Antimicrobial stewardship programs save hospitals millions of dollars, according to a study published in the April issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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Cellphone Radiation In-Utero Linked to Neuropathology

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Mice exposed to cellphone radiation in-utero are more hyperactive and have impaired memory, according to an experimental study published online March 15 in Scientific Reports.

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Characteristics of Episiotomy Incision Influence Injury Risk

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Narrow-angled episiotomies increase the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), while other factors, including point of incision and episiotomy length and depth, reduce the risk of OASIS, according to a study published online March 6 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Generic Boniva Approved for Osteoporosis

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic versions of the once-monthly osteoporosis drug Boniva (ibandronate) have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Higher After Birth of Small Baby

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Women who deliver a smaller than expected infant have a nearly two-fold higher risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD), according to a study published online March 14 in PLoS One.

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Study Validates Perimenopausal Memory Complaints

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- For perimenopausal women, memory complaints are associated with working memory and complex attention performance, according to a study published online March 12 in Menopause.

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Moderate Physical Activity Can Improve Fertility in Women

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate physical activity (PA) may improve fertility in all women, regardless of their weight, according to research published online March 16 in Fertility and Sterility.

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Prenatal Meth Exposure Linked to Behavioral Problems

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal methamphetamine (MA) exposure is linked to emotional and anxiety problems in 3-year-olds and an increased risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 5-year-olds, according to a study published online March 19 in Pediatrics.

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Six Months of Breastfeeding Unrealistic for Many Mothers

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- The recommendation to exclusively breastfeed for six months after birth is unrealistic and too rigid for many mothers, representing a clash between idealism and reality, according to a study published online March 14 in BMJ Open.

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Poorer Health Literacy Linked to Increased Mortality

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of older adults in England have medium or low health literacy, which is associated with increased mortality, according to a study published online March 15 in BMJ.

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Bicycle Handlebar Position Affects Female Genital Sensation

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Low handlebar positioning relative to the bicycle saddle is associated with increased perineal saddle pressure and decreased sensation in critical pelvic floor structures, according to research published online March 5 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Mom's Voice and Heartbeat May Help Premature Babies

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Preliminary evidence suggests that exposing preterm infants, cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), to the sound of their mother's voice and heartbeat may reduce the number of cardiorespiratory events (CREs) they experience, especially in those 33 weeks of gestation and older, according to research published online Feb. 2 in the Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine.

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Dietary Cadmium May Increase Breast Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- In postmenopausal women, high dietary cadmium exposure is associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer, after adjusting for other potential confounders, according to research published in the March 15 issue of Cancer Research.

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Analgesic Use After Surgery Linked to Long-Term Use

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients prescribed opioids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain relief after short-stay surgery appear to be at increased risk for becoming long-term analgesic users, according to a study published in the March 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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HIV Burden High Among Female Sex Workers Globally

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among female sex workers in low-income and middle-income countries, the burden of HIV is disproportionately high, compared with other similar-aged women, according to a study published online March 15 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Men's Dietary Fat Intake Linked to Sperm Quality

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- The type of fats men eat affects their sperm quality, according to a study published online March 13 in Human Reproduction.

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Most Hospital Errors in Developing Countries Preventable

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 10 percent of patients admitted to a hospital in a developing country experience at least one adverse event, most of which are preventable and are largely due to inadequate training and supervision rather than an absence of resources, according to a study published online March 13 in BMJ.

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Personal Mobile Computers Improve Resident Efficiency

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- The use of personal mobile computers (Apple iPads) by internal medicine residents improves efficiency, according to a research letter published in the March 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Higher Spending by Hospitals Improves Outcomes

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that are part of the universal health care system in Canada that spend more on inpatient care have lower rates of deaths and hospital readmissions, according to a study published in the March 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Higher Red Meat Consumption Linked to Risk of Death

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Eating more red meat appears to be associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality and death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer specifically, according to research published online March 12 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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U.S. Mortality Rates Dropped 60 Percent From 1935 to 2010

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- From 1935 to 2010, the death rate in the United States decreased considerably, although the single-year improvements in mortality were often small, according to a March data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Inflammation, Fatigue Tied to Omega-3 Intake After Breast CA

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer survivors there may be an association between inflammation, intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), and fatigue, with increased intake linked to decreased inflammation and fatigue, according to research published online March 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Neonatal Size Associated With Asthma Development

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Larger neonates born at term to mothers with a history of asthma are more likely to develop asthma by age 7, but are not more likely to have allergic sensitization or atopic dermatitis, according to research published online March 2 in Allergy.

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Flu Vaccine Up Among Medical Staff When They Believe It Works

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital health care workers (HCWs) are more likely to receive the seasonal influenza vaccination if they believe it works and are committed to preventing this highly contagious virus, according to research published in the April issue of Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

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New Silicone Breast Implant Approved

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Sientra Inc.'s silicone gel-filled breast implant has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for breast reconstruction or augmentation in women aged 22 or older, the agency said Friday in a news release.

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Surrogates Tend to Misinterpret Poor Prognosis Information

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Surrogate decision makers for critically ill patients interpret prognostic statements expressing a low risk of death accurately, but interpret statements conveying poor prognosis optimistically, according to a study published in the March 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Elective Induction of Labor Increases Complications

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Induction of labor for non-recognized indications (elective induction of labor) at term is associated with an increased risk of cesarean section delivery and other complications, according to a large cohort study published in the February issue of Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

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Menopausal Symptoms Negatively Affect Work Ability

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Menopausal symptoms negatively affect work ability, according to research published in the March issue of Menopause.

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Misoprostol Cuts Complications in First-Trimester Abortion

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Vaginal administration of misoprostol before first-trimester abortion by vacuum aspiration is associated with reduced complications, according to a study published online March 8 in The Lancet.

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Prenatal SSRI Use Impacts Fetal Head Growth, Preterm Birth

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Untreated maternal depression is linked to reduced fetal head and body growth, while use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy improves symptoms of depression but results in reduced head growth and an increased risk of preterm birth, according to research published online March 5 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy Not Recommended

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid substitution therapy with buprenorphine is not recommended for opioid-addicted health care professionals (HCPs), according to research published in the March issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Scottish Smoke-Free Law Cuts Poor Neonatal Outcomes

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of smoke-free legislation in Scotland in 2006 has been associated with a reduction in small for gestational age and preterm delivery, according to a study published online March 6 in PLoS Medicine.

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Four or More PMDD Symptoms Linked With Impairment

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Women with four or more symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) are likely to experience impairment, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Drug Approved to Prevent Respiratory Distress Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Surfaxin (lucinactant) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent respiratory distress syndrome, a serious lung condition that affects infants born prematurely.

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For Women, Offspring Number, Parity Linked to Lower MS Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- For women, higher offspring number and higher parity are associated with a reduced risk of first clinical demyelinating event (FCD), according to a study published online March 7 in Neurology.

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Double Gloving Prevents Exposure to Pathogens in OR

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Double gloving during surgery reduces the risk for transmission of bloodborne pathogens to medical personnel as well as minimizing the transfer of health care-associated infections to patients, according to a study published in the March issue of the AORN Journal.

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Interrupting Sitting Lowers Glucose, Insulin Levels in Obese

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Interrupting long periods of sitting with light- or moderate-intensity activity is associated with significant reductions in postprandial glucose and insulin levels among overweight and obese individuals, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in Diabetes Care.

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Estrogen-Only HRT Lowers Breast CA in Women With Hysterectomy

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- The use of estrogen-only after hysterectomy lowers the risk of breast cancer, but largely in groups already at low risk of breast cancer, according to a study published online March 7 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Financial Burden of Medical Care Affects One in Three

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- In the first half of 2011, one in three individuals was in a family that experienced the financial burden of medical care in the United States, according to the results of the National Health Interview Survey published March 7 by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Simplified Delivery Has Little Effect on Bleeding Risk

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Omitting controlled cord traction, a procedure to extract the placenta that requires a skilled birth attendant, after delivery has little effect on the risk of excessive postpartum bleeding when oxytocin is administered immediately after birth, according to a study published online March 6 in The Lancet.

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Electronic Test Result Access Does Not Reduce Test Ordering

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- For office-based physicians, electronic access to patient imaging and laboratory test results does not decrease -- and may actually increase -- the number of diagnostic tests ordered, according to research published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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Patient Preferences a Factor in Premature Birth Options

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Obstetric decisions in managing and counseling for periviable deliveries are heavily influenced by patient preference and perspectives on patient autonomy, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Prenatal Ecstasy Use May Harm Infant Development

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), or ecstasy, before and during pregnancy poses a risk to the developing infant, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in Neurotoxicology and Teratology.

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PISQ-12 Validated for Patients With Pelvic Organ Prolapse

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- The Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12) has been shown to be a valid measure of sexual function in patients who undergo surgical mesh implantation for treatment of pelvic organ prolapse, according to research published online Feb. 21 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Home Lead Inspections Linked to Lower Lead in Children

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- A program that inspects the homes of high-risk pregnant women for lead and remediates them is effective in reducing lead levels and lead poisoning in their children, according to a study in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Risk of Poor Neonatal Outcome Up With Decreasing Gestation

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- The health outcomes of infants born moderate/late preterm or early term are worse than those born full term, with a gradient of increasing risk with decreasing gestation, according to a study published online March 1 in BMJ.

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Pap Smears Increase Cervical Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Women whose cervical cancers are detected by cervical smears are much more likely to survive than women whose cancers are symptomatic, according to a study published online March 1 in BMJ.

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Gestational Diabetes, Obesity Impact Pregnancy Outcomes

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who are obese have significantly higher odds of adverse pregnancy outcomes, according to findings from the multinational Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study published online Feb. 22 in Diabetes Care.

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Trans Fat Intake Tied to Stroke in Postmenopausal Women

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Higher trans fat intake increases the risk of ischemic stroke independent of other lifestyle factors, but the adverse effects of trans fat on ischemic stroke may be mitigated by aspirin, according to a study published online March 1 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Phone Counseling Doesn't Up Osteoporosis Meds Adherence

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a telephone-based motivational interviewing intervention does not improve adherence to an osteoporosis medication regimen, according to research published online Feb. 27 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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