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March 2012 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: April 02, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for March 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Maternal and Child Health Inequalities Found Worldwide

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- As part of Countdown to 2015, substantial variation has been identified between countries and interventions with respect to coverage levels of maternal, neonatal, and child health interventions, according to a study published in the March 31 issue of The Lancet.

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Genetic Variants Confer Susceptibility to Fatty Liver

FRIDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two genes, coding for glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) and patatin-like phospholipase 3 (PNPLA3), act together to increase the susceptibility of obese children and adolescents to fatty liver disease, according to research published in the March issue of Hepatology.

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CDC: Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders Increasing

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- The estimated prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in 2008 was 11.3 per 1,000 children, which shows a marked increase from earlier estimates, according to a report published March 30 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Secondhand Smoke Exposure, Lung Function Link Explored

THURSDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand smoke during early childhood is associated with decreased lung function, and allergic sensitization affects this association, particularly among girls, according to a study published online March 21 in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

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Vaccine Cuts Risk of Subsequent HPV-Related Disease

WEDNESDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women surgically treated for human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease who were previously vaccinated with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine have reduced incidence of subsequent HPV-related disease, according to a study published online March 27 in BMJ.

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Majority of Children Affected by Allergy-Related Diseases

WEDNESDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of children have one or more allergy-related diseases, including eczema, asthma, and rhinitis, according to research published in the April issue of Allergy.

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Cost Sharing Reduces Use of Asthma Medication

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Higher out-of-pocket expenses are tied to a slight reduction in use of asthma medications in children aged 5 years or older, which results in increased hospitalizations, according to a study published in the March 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Dual Mode Laser Therapy Effectively Treats Acne Vulgaris

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- A series of Nd:YAG laser treatments effectively and rapidly reduces both inflammatory and noninflammatory acne vulgaris lesions, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Diagnosis of ADHD Has Risen 66 Percent Over Last Decade

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- The diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents has increased 66 percent in the last decade, with approximately one-third of these young patients now being managed by psychiatrists, rather than pediatricians, according to research published in the March issue of Academic Pediatrics.

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New Guidelines Issued for Red Blood Cell Transfusions

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- A restrictive red blood cell transfusion strategy should be employed for hemodynamically stable adults and children, according to a clinical practice guideline issued by the AABB (formerly the American Association of Blood Banks) and published online March 26 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Child Coordination Disorder Ups Risk of Mental Health Issues

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Children with probable developmental coordination disorder (DCD) at age 7 have a significantly increased risk of depression and mental health difficulties at age 10, according to a study published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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Policy Statement Issued on Pediatric Sudden Cardiac Arrest

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians need to recognize the warning signs and appropriately manage patients with sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), according to a policy statement issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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Few Young Women With Cancer Pursue Fertility Preservation

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Few women with cancer diagnosed before age 40 take steps to preserve their fertility during treatment, according to a study published online March 26 in Cancer.

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Confusion About Emergency Contraception Access Common

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- While most pharmacies report having emergency contraception (EC) in stock, misinformation regarding what age women can take it without a prescription is common, according to a study published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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More Variation in SIDS Risk Factors in Back-to-Sleep Era

MONDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Following initiation of the Back-to-Sleep (BTS) campaign in 1994, there have been variations in the risk profile of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a study published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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Fewer Mitochondria in Offspring of Parents With Diabetes

FRIDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Normal-weight, insulin-resistant individuals whose parents have type 2 diabetes have fewer mitochondria in their muscles due to lower expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), according to a study published in the April issue of Diabetes.

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Iron Overload Does Not Worsen Stem Cell Transplant Outcomes

FRIDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Although iron overload before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is common, iron does not accumulate after transplantation and is not associated with adverse outcomes in patients with leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome, according to a study published online March 12 in the American Journal of Hematology.

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Genes Differ in Brains of Young and Old With Autism

FRIDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Young and old patients with autism differ in the expression of genes in the prefrontal cortex of the brain, an area of overgrowth and excess neurons in autism, according to a study published online March 22 in PLoS Genetics.

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Prenatal Exposure to Smog Tied to Child Behavior Problems

FRIDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to high levels of airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is associated with adverse outcomes on child behavior, according to research published online March 22 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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New Guidelines Issued for Acute Bacterial Rhinosinusitis

THURSDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- As the majority of rhinosinusitis cases are viral, antimicrobial therapy should be initiated after establishment of a clinical diagnosis of bacterial rhinosinusitis, and β-lactam agents are recommended for initial therapy, according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America's first rhinosinusitis guidelines published online March 20 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Health Care Team Members Key for Antimicrobial Stewardship

THURSDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) that use health care epidemiologists (HEs) and infection preventionists (IPs) have a crucial role to play in the effort to combat health care-associated infections (HAIs), including those caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), according to the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America position paper published in the March issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Diet Soda Linked to Increase in Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Levels

THURSDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking a diet soda before a glucose load is associated with increased glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion in individuals with type 1 diabetes and healthy controls, but not in those with type 2 diabetes, according to research published online March 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Tobacco Smoke Exposure in Childhood Ups COPD Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) during childhood is associated with an increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among adult women, and is a significant risk factor for respiratory symptoms in men, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Respirology.

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Seeing a Human Infant Face Induces Brain Activation

WEDNESDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Viewing an infant face, even an unfamiliar one, is associated with activation of brain regions associated with communication, attachment, and caregiving, according to a study published in the April issue of NeuroImage.

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Survey Describes Docs' Online Professionalism Violations

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Most medical licensing authorities receive and act upon reports of physicians' online professionalism violations, according to a research letter published in the March 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Carbohydrate-Modified Diets As Effective As Portion-Controlled

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Low carbohydrate (LC) and reduced glycemic load (RGL) diets are as effective as a standard portion-controlled (PC) diet for weight management in children; however, the low-carbohydrate diet is the hardest for children to follow, according to research published online March 1 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Cellphone Radiation In-Utero Linked to Neuropathology

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Mice exposed to cellphone radiation in-utero are more hyperactive and have impaired memory, according to an experimental study published online March 15 in Scientific Reports.

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Nurse-Initiated Steroids Improve Pediatric Asthma Care

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Nurse initiation of oral corticosteroids before physician assessment of pediatric patients with asthma improves quality and efficiency of care provided in the pediatric emergency department, according to a study published online March 19 in Pediatrics.

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Antimicrobial Stewardship Saves Millions of Dollars

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Antimicrobial stewardship programs save hospitals millions of dollars, according to a study published in the April issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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Prenatal Meth Exposure Linked to Behavioral Problems

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal methamphetamine (MA) exposure is linked to emotional and anxiety problems in 3-year-olds and an increased risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 5-year-olds, according to a study published online March 19 in Pediatrics.

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Synthetic Cannabinoid Toxicity Among Teenagers on the Rise

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking synthetic versions of marijuana is landing some teens in the emergency room complaining of restlessness, agitation, and diaphoresis, according to a case report published online March 19 in Pediatrics.

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Majority of Children Overburdened by Backpacks

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of students carry backpacks weighing more than 10 percent of their body weight, and those carrying the heaviest backpacks are at increased risk of back pain, according to a study published online March 10 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Jobs, Earnings Affected for Mothers of Children With Autism

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are more likely to be unemployed, work fewer hours per week, and earn significantly less than mothers of children with no health limitations, according to a study published online March 19 in Pediatrics.

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Most California Hospitals Implementing Infection Control

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Most California hospitals implement some policies to improve infection control for multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), primarily methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), but few policies are associated with lower MDRO rates, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Communication Can Ease Mental Health Burden of Deaf

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- There is a high prevalence of mental health problems among deaf individuals, with access to care compounded by communication difficulties, according to a review published in the March 17 issue of The Lancet.

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Gene Profile Correlates With Glycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- A gene expression profile in peripheral blood correlates with glycemic control in the first year for patients recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online March 8 in Diabetes.

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Six Months of Breastfeeding Unrealistic for Many Mothers

FRIDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- The recommendation to exclusively breastfeed for six months after birth is unrealistic and too rigid for many mothers, representing a clash between idealism and reality, according to a study published online March 14 in BMJ Open.

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Mom's Voice and Heartbeat May Help Premature Babies

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Preliminary evidence suggests that exposing preterm infants, cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), to the sound of their mother's voice and heartbeat may reduce the number of cardiorespiratory events (CREs) they experience, especially in those 33 weeks of gestation and older, according to research published online Feb. 2 in the Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine.

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FTY720 Shows Promise for Spinal Cord Injury Recovery

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- A mouse model of spinal cord injury (SCI) suggests that the orally-administered sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist FTY720 has immune-independent functions which promote functional recovery, according to an experimental study published online March 15 in The American Journal of Pathology.

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Smoking in Movies Increases Smoking Risk for Young Teens

THURSDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to smoking in movies in early adolescence is associated with established smoking among adolescents, according to a review published online March 14 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Specific Mutations in AML Affect Response to Therapy

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harboring specific combinations of mutations benefit from high-dose daunorubicin; and the majority of bone marrow cells in myelodysplastic syndromes and secondary AML are clonal and harbor multiple mutations, according to two studies published online March 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Peer-Led Parenting Classes Benefit Parents and Children

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Families participating in peer-led parenting classes experience improvements in children's disruptive behavior problems and parenting practices, according to a study published online March 13 in BMJ.

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Most Hospital Errors in Developing Countries Preventable

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 10 percent of patients admitted to a hospital in a developing country experience at least one adverse event, most of which are preventable and are largely due to inadequate training and supervision rather than an absence of resources, according to a study published online March 13 in BMJ.

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Personal Mobile Computers Improve Resident Efficiency

WEDNESDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- The use of personal mobile computers (Apple iPads) by internal medicine residents improves efficiency, according to a research letter published in the March 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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ATRX Mutation Linked With Age at Diagnosis of Neuroblastoma

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the ATRX gene are associated with age at diagnosis of advanced-stage neuroblastoma in children and young adults, according to a study published in the March 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Practical Strategies Can Ease Death Notification in the ER

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- By using practical strategies based on available literature, notifying survivors of a death in the emergency department can be less traumatic for both the survivor and the physician, nurse, or other health care provider tasked with delivering the news, according to an article published in the March issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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U.S. Mortality Rates Dropped 60 Percent From 1935 to 2010

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- From 1935 to 2010, the death rate in the United States decreased considerably, although the single-year improvements in mortality were often small, according to a March data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Spanking, Genes Interact to Influence Antisocial Behavior

TUESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Interactions between physical punishment and genetic risk during early childhood yield a significant influence on antisocial behavior, especially in males, according to a study published in Aggressive Behavior.

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Youth Agricultural Injuries a Significant Problem

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, more than 26,000 youth agricultural injuries, which tend to be more severe and costly than nonagricultural injuries, occur annually, at a cost of $1.4 billion per year, according to research published online March 12 in Pediatrics.

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Neonatal Size Associated With Asthma Development

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Larger neonates born at term to mothers with a history of asthma are more likely to develop asthma by age 7, but are not more likely to have allergic sensitization or atopic dermatitis, according to research published online March 2 in Allergy.

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Stair-Related Injuries in Young Children Declining

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Stair-related injuries among young children have been on the decline for the last decade or so in the United States but are still an important source of injury, according to a study published online March 12 in Pediatrics.

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Staph Sepsis Increases Mortality in Preterm Infants

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Only about 1 percent of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants develop methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, and the morbidity and mortality are similar to that seen in infants with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infections, according to a study published online March 12 in Pediatrics.

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Parental Psych Well-Being Impacts VLBW Child Behavior

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- For very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, poor parental psychological well-being is associated with behavioral problems at age 3, according to a study published online March 12 in Pediatrics.

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Use of Head CT Varies Between Emergency Physicians

MONDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- In the emergency department, there is wide interphysician variation in the use of head computed tomography (CT) overall, and for patients diagnosed with atraumatic headache, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the American Journal of Medicine.

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Common Products May Contain Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Many common products, including sunscreen and fragranced products, contain multiple endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) or asthma-related chemicals, which are often not listed on the label, according to a study published online March 8 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Flu Vaccine Up Among Medical Staff When They Believe It Works

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital health care workers (HCWs) are more likely to receive the seasonal influenza vaccination if they believe it works and are committed to preventing this highly contagious virus, according to research published in the April issue of Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

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Elective Induction of Labor Increases Complications

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Induction of labor for non-recognized indications (elective induction of labor) at term is associated with an increased risk of cesarean section delivery and other complications, according to a large cohort study published in the February issue of Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

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Surrogates Tend to Misinterpret Poor Prognosis Information

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Surrogate decision makers for critically ill patients interpret prognostic statements expressing a low risk of death accurately, but interpret statements conveying poor prognosis optimistically, according to a study published in the March 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Scottish Smoke-Free Law Cuts Poor Neonatal Outcomes

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of smoke-free legislation in Scotland in 2006 has been associated with a reduction in small for gestational age and preterm delivery, according to a study published online March 6 in PLoS Medicine.

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Increased Cognitive Decline One Year After Mild TBI in Children

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) continue to experience postconcussive symptoms that are associated with functional impairment, according to research published online March 5 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Eating Fruits and Vegetables Improves Skin Color

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with a beneficial effect on skin coloration and perceived attractiveness, according to a study published online March 7 in PLoS One.

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ENB-0040 Shows Promise for Hypophosphatasia in Children

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- For infants and children with hypophosphatasia, treatment with ENB-0040, a bone-targeted, recombinant human tissue-nonspecific isozyme of alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP), is associated with healing of rickets and improved pulmonary and physical function, according to an open-label study published in the March 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Prenatal SSRI Use Impacts Fetal Head Growth, Preterm Birth

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Untreated maternal depression is linked to reduced fetal head and body growth, while use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy improves symptoms of depression but results in reduced head growth and an increased risk of preterm birth, according to research published online March 5 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy Not Recommended

THURSDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid substitution therapy with buprenorphine is not recommended for opioid-addicted health care professionals (HCPs), according to research published in the March issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Drug Approved to Prevent Respiratory Distress Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Surfaxin (lucinactant) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent respiratory distress syndrome, a serious lung condition that affects infants born prematurely.

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Financial Burden of Medical Care Affects One in Three

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- In the first half of 2011, one in three individuals was in a family that experienced the financial burden of medical care in the United States, according to the results of the National Health Interview Survey published March 7 by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Long-Term Cardiac Effects for Childhood Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Regardless of exposure to cardiotoxic cancer therapies, survivors of childhood cancers display cardiovascular abnormalities and have markers of increased systemic inflammation and atherosclerotic disease, according to research published online March 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Vitamin D May Reduces Stress Fractures in Adolescent Girls

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- High intake of vitamin D is associated with a reduced risk of stress fractures in adolescent girls, particularly for those who engage in high-impact activity, according to a study published online March 5 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Negative Prediction for Sudden Cardiac Death High With ECG

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Electrocardiogram (ECG), with or without echocardiogram (ECHO), may have potential value as a mass screening tool to identify the most common causes of pediatric sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to a meta-analysis published online March 5 in Pediatrics.

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Electronic Test Result Access Does Not Reduce Test Ordering

TUESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- For office-based physicians, electronic access to patient imaging and laboratory test results does not decrease -- and may actually increase -- the number of diagnostic tests ordered, according to research published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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Youngest in Class More Likely to Be Diagnosed With ADHD

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- The youngest children in a classroom are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and prescribed medication than their older peers in the same grade, according to a study published online March 5 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Patient Preferences a Factor in Premature Birth Options

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Obstetric decisions in managing and counseling for periviable deliveries are heavily influenced by patient preference and perspectives on patient autonomy, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Prenatal Ecstasy Use May Harm Infant Development

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), or ecstasy, before and during pregnancy poses a risk to the developing infant, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in Neurotoxicology and Teratology.

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Barriers Identified to Pediatric Advance Care Discussions

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Prognostic understanding and parental attitude are significant barriers to advance care discussions (ACD) for children with life-threatening conditions, according to a study published online March 5 in Pediatrics.

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Children's Snoring May Predict Behavioral Problems

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children during the first years of life appears to be strongly associated with future behavioral problems, according to a study published online March 5 in Pediatrics.

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Viewing Alcohol Use in Movies Tied to Teen Binge Drinking

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent exposure to movies that depict alcohol consumption is significantly associated with binge drinking, according to a multi-national study published online March 5 in Pediatrics.

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Home Lead Inspections Linked to Lower Lead in Children

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- A program that inspects the homes of high-risk pregnant women for lead and remediates them is effective in reducing lead levels and lead poisoning in their children, according to a study in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Risk of Poor Neonatal Outcome Up With Decreasing Gestation

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- The health outcomes of infants born moderate/late preterm or early term are worse than those born full term, with a gradient of increasing risk with decreasing gestation, according to a study published online March 1 in BMJ.

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Parent Training, Meds Combo Improves Behavior in PDD

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) and serious behavioral problems respond better to medication combined with parent training than just medication, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Gestational Diabetes, Obesity Impact Pregnancy Outcomes

FRIDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who are obese have significantly higher odds of adverse pregnancy outcomes, according to findings from the multinational Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study published online Feb. 22 in Diabetes Care.

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Internet-Based Program Treats Chronic Fatigue in Teens

THURSDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Use of an Internet-based therapeutic program, Fatigue In Teenagers on the interNET (FITNET), improves outcomes for adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome, according to a study published online March 1 in The Lancet.

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