P. falciparum from 2001 to 2010; mainly due to parasite genetics” />

Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Infections | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Resistant Malaria Increasing on Thailand-Myanmar Border

Last Updated: April 05, 2012.

 

Increase in artemisinin resistance in P. falciparum from 2001 to 2010; mainly due to parasite genetics

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
From 2001 to 2010, an increase was seen in artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum on the Thailand-Myanmar border, which was largely attributable to parasite genetics, according to a longitudinal study published online April 5 in The Lancet.

THURSDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2010, an increase was seen in artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) on the Thailand-Myanmar border, which was largely attributable to parasite genetics, according to a longitudinal study published online April 5 in The Lancet.

To ascertain whether artemisinin resistance has spread or emerged on the Thailand-Myanmar border, Aung Pyae Phyo, M.D., from Mahidol University in Bangkok, and colleagues measured six-hourly parasite counts in 3,202 patients with uncomplicated hyperparasitemic falciparum malaria who were treated in clinics along the northwestern border of Thailand from 2001 to 2010. Patients were given oral artesunate-containing regimens. Parasites were genotyped and their clearance half-lives were estimated.

From 2001 to 2010, the researchers found that the parasite clearance half-lives lengthened from a geometric mean of 2.6 hours to 3.7 hours, and the proportion of slow-clearing infections increased from 0.6 to 20 percent. In 119 patients in western Cambodia, the mean clearance measured between 2007 and 2010 was 5.5 hours, and 42 percent of the infections were slow-clearing during that time. One hundred forty-eight multilocus parasite genotypes were identified in 1,583 infections that were genotyped; between two and 13 patients were infected with each genotype. There was an increase in the proportion of variation in parasite clearance which was due to parasite genetics, from 30 percent in 2001-2004 to 66 percent in 2007-2010.

"Genetically determined artemisinin resistance in P. falciparum emerged along the Thailand-Myanmar border at least eight years ago and has since increased substantially," the authors write.

One author is co-chairman of the World Health Organization antimalarial treatment guidelines committee.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Increased Breast Cancer Risk With False-Positive Test Next: Asbestos Exposure Linked to Cardiovascular Death

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.