Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Gynecology | Neurology | Nursing | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Emergency Medicine | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Early Exposure to Interpersonal Trauma Harms Cognition

Last Updated: April 06, 2012.

 

Harm from exposure in the first two years of life persists at age 8

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Exposure to interpersonal trauma in the first years of life is associated with decreased cognitive functioning in childhood, with exposure in the first two years particularly harmful, according to a study published online April 4 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

FRIDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to interpersonal trauma (IPT) in the first years of life is associated with decreased cognitive functioning in childhood, with exposure in the first two years particularly harmful, according to a study published online April 4 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

To investigate the impact of exposure to IPT in the first years of life on childhood cognitive functioning, Michelle Bosquet Enlow, Ph.D., from the Children's Hospital Boston, and colleagues assessed 206 children participating in a longitudinal birth cohort study. Participant exposure to IPT (physical, emotional, or sexual abuse; physical or emotional neglect; witnessing maternal partner violence) between birth and 64 months was assessed. IQ scores were evaluated at 24, 64, and 96 months of age.

The researchers found that IPT exposure correlated significantly with reduced cognitive scores at all time points, even after adjustment for sociodemographics, maternal IQ, and other confounding factors. Exposure to IPT in the first two years was particularly harmful. On average, exposed children scored one-half standard deviation lower across cognitive assessments compared with children not exposed to IPT in the first two years of life.

"The current findings suggest that the first years of life is a period of heightened sensitivity to substantial and enduring cognitive effects from such exposures," the authors write. "These findings highlight the importance of identifying at-risk families and preventing IPT in early life to promote positive cognitive development throughout childhood."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Methotrexate and Azathioprine Equally Efficacious for Eczema Next: Physical Activity Predicts Functionality in Older Adults

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.