Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Nursing | Pharmacy | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Metal Binding Important for Metformin Action

Last Updated: April 13, 2012.

 

Mechanism of action may involve copper binding

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The ability of metformin to bind mitochondrial copper may be essential to its mechanism of action, according to a study published online April 9 in Diabetes.

FRIDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- The ability of metformin to bind mitochondrial copper may be essential to its mechanism of action, according to a study published online April 9 in Diabetes.

Noting that the target of metformin is unclear but most evidence has shown that the drug binds to metal ions, most stably to copper, rather than protein targets, Lisa Logie, Ph.D., from the University of Dundee in the United Kingdom, and colleagues interfered with the ability of metformin to bind copper and examined the impact on cellular responses.

The researchers found that copper sequestration interfered with the known effects of metformin on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent signaling and S6 protein phosphorylation, which were regulated independently. The metformin-copper interaction was stabilized by extensive pi-electron delocalization, which allowed regulation of AMPK, production of glucose, gluconeogenic gene expression, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial copper binding. In contrast, direct modification of the metal-liganding groups of the biguanide structure prevented regulation of S6 phosphorylation. Further studies showed that pioglitazone also targeted mitochondrial copper.

"In summary, this study indicates that effects of metformin and related compounds on cell responses depend on their ability to interact with copper," Logie and colleagues conclude. "More broadly, our results suggest that the number of targets for drug discovery could be widened not only by investigating nonprotein targets such as copper, but also by considering the role of metal-induced effects on chemical bonding and conformational geometries of drug structures."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Herbal Carcinogen Linked to Urothelial Cancer in Taiwan Next: Crizotinib Treatment Lowers Total Testosterone Levels

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.