Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Dermatology | Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Nursing | ENT | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Basal Cell Carcinoma on Ear Significantly More Aggressive

Last Updated: April 18, 2012.

 

BCC on ear primarily occurs in men, but aggressive phenotype seen in both men and women

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Basal cell carcinoma on the ear is significantly more likely to be aggressive, and occurs more frequently in men, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

WEDNESDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) on the ear is significantly more likely to be aggressive, and occurs more frequently in men, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

To investigate whether BCC on the ear is significantly more aggressive, Abel D. Jarell, M.D., and Thaddeus W. Mully, M.D., from the University of California in San Francisco, reviewed the 2009 database for all BCC biopsied from the ear. Tumor subtype, risk level, and other data points were analyzed for 100 BCCs on the ear and 100 BCCs on the cheek.

The researchers found that BCC was diagnosed on the ear 471 times. High-risk BCC was seen in 57 percent of the first 100 occurrences of BCC on the ear, compared with 38 percent on the cheek (odds ratio, 2.16). Men were significantly more likely to have BCC on the ear: 79 percent on the ear versus 53 percent on the cheek. For women, BCC on the ear was also more likely to be aggressive (57 percent).

"Although BCC occurs on the ear with much greater frequency in men, BCCs on the ear in both men and women are more likely than not to be of an aggressive phenotype," the authors write. "Medical providers performing biopsies on the ear of lesions suspicious for malignancy should ensure that an adequate specimen is obtained, as deeper, more aggressive subtypes may not be seen with superficial biopsy specimens."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Omega-3 Supplements Don't Benefit Patients With MS Next: 3D Histological Reconstruction Method Developed

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.