Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Nursing | Radiology | Conference News

Back to Journal Articles

EB: Reduced Basal Ganglia Activation in Chronic Fatigue

Last Updated: April 24, 2012.

 

Decreased globus pallidus activation linked with increased mental, general fatigue in CFS

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Reduced basal ganglia activation may play a role in chronic fatigue syndrome, according to a study presented at the Experimental Biology 2012 meeting, held from April 21 to 25 in San Diego.

TUESDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- Reduced basal ganglia activation may play a role in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), according to a study presented at the Experimental Biology 2012 meeting, held from April 21 to 25 in San Diego.

Elizabeth R. Unger, M.D., from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and colleagues used a monetary win-lose gambling task which strongly activates basal ganglia to investigate basal ganglia function in 18 individuals with CFS and 41 non-fatigued, age-, sex-, and race-matched controls. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging, and activation in basal ganglia regions of interest was measured.

The researchers found that, compared with controls, individuals with CFS exhibited reduced right caudate and right globus pallidus activation (P = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). Reduced activation of the globus pallidus correlated with significantly increased mental fatigue, general fatigue, and decreased activity Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory scores of individuals with CFS (P = 0.001, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively).

"Many patients with chronic fatigue syndrome encounter a lot of skepticism about their illness," Unger said in a statement. "They have difficulty getting their friends, colleagues, coworkers, and even some physicians to understand their illness. These results provide another clue into the biology of chronic fatigue syndrome."

More Information

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: COSM: Study Finds Insomnia Increases Severity of Tinnitus Next: EB: Obese First Graders Often Disliked by Their Peers

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.