Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Gynecology | Nursing | Pediatrics | Conference News

Back to Journal Articles

ECO: Entering Parent Bed Lowers Odds of Child Obesity

Last Updated: May 10, 2012.

 

For young children predisposed to overweight, entering parents' bed may have protective effect

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Young children who are predisposed to overweight have a reduced likelihood of becoming overweight if they enter their parents' bed at night, according to a study presented at the European Congress on Obesity, held from May 9 to 11 in Lyon, France.

THURSDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Young children who are predisposed to overweight have a reduced likelihood of becoming overweight if they enter their parents' bed at night, according to a study presented at the European Congress on Obesity, held from May 9 to 11 in Lyon, France.

Nanna Julie Olsen, Ph.D., of the Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues conducted a study involving 645 children aged 2 to 6 years who were predisposed to overweight due to maternal pre-pregnancy overweight or low socioeconomic status or due to the child's high birth weight. Complete information was available for 497 children, including body mass index, and if and how often the child entered the parents' bed during the night.

Compared with young children who do not enter their parents' bed at night, the researchers found that, after adjusting for gender, child age, and parental education levels, children who entered their parents' bed during the night had a significantly reduced likelihood of being overweight (odds ratio, 0.5). The likelihood was further reduced for those entering their parents' bed every night (odds ratio, 0.3), compared with those who never entered.

"The results may suggest that elements of parental social support or other types of positive psychosocial responses if being allowed to enter parents' bed during night may protect against overweight, whereas types of negative psychosocial responses such as feelings of rejection when not being allowed to enter parents' bed may lead to overweight," Olsen said in a statement.

More Information

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: ECO: Normalizing Testosterone in Men Linked to Weight Loss Next: ECO: Gut Microbiota, Protein Intake Affect Child Obesity

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.