Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Critical Care | Emergency Medicine | Neurology | Nursing | Radiology | Surgery | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Better Outcomes at High-Volume Stroke Centers

Last Updated: May 15, 2012.

 

Faster times to treatment; patients more likely to have good clinical outcome, successful reperfusion

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
High-volume endovascular stroke centers provide faster times to treatment, and patients are more likely to have good clinical outcomes and successful reperfusion, according to a study published online May 13 in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

TUESDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- High-volume endovascular stroke centers provide faster times to treatment, and patients are more likely to have good clinical outcomes and successful reperfusion, according to a study published online May 13 in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

To investigate whether high-volume centers are efficient at delivery of endovascular treatment approaches, Rishi Gupta, M.D., of Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, and colleagues conducted a retrospective review involving 442 patients with a median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 18, treated at nine centers. A series of time points was assessed, from obtaining a computed tomography (CT) scan to the end of the endovascular procedure.

The researchers found that high-volume centers were more likely to treat patients after intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator and those transferred from outside hospitals. High-volume centers had significantly lower total procedure times (odds ratio [OR], 0.991; P = 0.001) and times from CT acquisition to groin puncture (OR, 0.991; P = 0.001), after adjustment for confounding variables. A good clinical outcome and successful reperfusion were significantly more likely for patients treated at high-volume centers (OR, 1.86 and 1.82, respectively).

"Centers that currently perform higher numbers of these procedures appear to have lower times to reperfusion and a higher proportion of patients with successful reperfusion, translating into improved clinical outcomes," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Trail Making Test Performance Predicts Post-Stroke Mortality Next: Lack of Post-MI Discharge Advice Hinders Sexual Activity

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.