Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Infections | Nursing | ENT | Pathology | Pediatrics | Pulmonology | Allergy | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Individual Variation in Antiviral Response Present at Birth

Last Updated: May 25, 2012.

 

Differences in innate immune response may predict susceptibility to respiratory illness during first year

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Congenital variations in innate immunity, which are detectable at birth, might predict an infant's susceptibility to acute respiratory tract illness during the first year of life, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Congenital variations in innate immunity, which are detectable at birth, might predict an infant's susceptibility to acute respiratory tract illness during the first year of life, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Kaharu Sumino, M.D., M.P.H., from Washington University in St. Louis, and colleagues studied 82 inner-city children with at least one parent with allergy or asthma. At 24 hours after inoculation with respiratory syncytial virus, cord blood monocytes were cultured and assessed for IFNG and CCL5 mRNA production. The frequency of acute respiratory tract illness was monitored at three-month intervals, and at the time of illness during the first year, nasal lavage samples were analyzed.

The researchers found that 88 percent of subjects were reported to have respiratory tract infections, and respiratory tract viruses were identified in 74 percent of symptomatic children. A wide range of antiviral responses were recorded in cord blood monocytes. In response to respiratory syncytial virus infection of monocytes, a decrease in production of IFNG, but not CCL5, mRNA correlated with a significant increase in the frequency of upper respiratory tract infections as well as the prevalence of ear and sinus infections, pneumonias, and respiratory-related hospitalizations.

"Individual variations in the innate immune response to respiratory tract viruses are detectable even at birth, and these differences predict the susceptibility to acute respiratory tract illness during the first year of life," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Family History of Alzheimer's Affects Functional Connectivity Next: Transvaginal Mesh Op Restores Pelvic Organ Prolapse at Price

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.